Skip to main content

Full text of "Thomason Civil Engineering College Calendar"

See other formats


TEXT PROBLEM 
WITHIN THE 
BOOK ONLY 



CO > DO 

8]<OU 164385 g 

~ 



THOMASON 

CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 
ROORKEE," U.. P. 



%H ' W> 

mim. 



CALENDAR, 

1929. 




fc- 



THE HON'BLE RflJfl BflHflDUR KUSHflliPflk SINGH, WX L 
Minister fop Education, United Provinces. 

(Presided at the Thomason College, Convocation, July 1929), 



i.B., 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Almanac, ... ... ... ... 1 

Advisory Council of the Thorn ason College, ... ... 9 

College 'Staff, 16th October, 1929, ... ... ... 10 

General Description of the Thomason College, ... ... 13 

History of the Thomason College, ... ... ... 17 

List of Principals, ... ... ... ... 45 

Convocation Presidents, ... ... ... 46 

Rules of admission : 

Civil Engineer Class, ... ... ,,. 51 

Supplement to the C. E. Class Circular, ... ... 69 

Overseer Class, ... ... ... ... 71 

Draftsman Class, ... ... ... ... 81 

Courses of Study, Syllabuses and Time tables : 

Civil Engineer Class, ... ... ... 85 

Overseer Class, ... ... ... ... 121 

Draftsman Class, ... ... ... ... 153 

Annual Prizes, ... ... ... ... 155 

Text-books recommended, ... ... ... 159 

Copies of the Rules for Examination, ... ... 165 

Duplicate Certificates, ... ... ... ... tb. 

Subsidiary Departments of the College, ... ... 167 

List of Donations, ... ... ... ... 169 

Rules of the College Advisory Council, ... ... 173 

,, Board of Studies, ... ... 177 

Standing Orders of the Thomason College, ... ... 179 

Yearly Lists of Students (from 1925 inclusive), ... ... 211 

Annual Report. 1929, ... ... ... 241 

Plan of Co'lege, ... ... ... ... End, 

Map of (Jolie^e Estate, ... ... ... ... End, 

Prize Lmt. Ii:^j, ... .., ... ... End. 



ALMANAC, 



THQMASON CIVIL EN6INEERING COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



OCTOBER, 1929. 



V/ ) j 




1 


i Days of 1 
[ the week. | 


General and Office. 


i 


(Days of 
the week. 


General and Office. 


1 


T 


i Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, Edu- 
| cation Department, United Provinces. 


I 


F 


{All Saints Day. 
Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer 
Education Department, United Pro 


2 


W 
Th 




2 


S 


vinces. 


4 


All 

F 




3 


8 


( 22nd Sunday after Trinity, 
< Call for latest edition of form of 


5 


S 




4 


M 


( confidential report on R,E. officers 


6 


If 


18th Sunday after Trinity, 


5 


T 




7 


M 




6 


W 




8 


T 




7 


Th 




9 


W 




8 


F 




10 


Th 




9 


S 




11 


F 


IDasehra. H, 


10 


8 


23rd Sunday after Trinity. 


12 


S 




11 


M 




13^ 


IT 


19th Sunday after Trinity, 


12 


T 




14 


M 




13 


W 




15 


T 


Vacation ends, 


14 


Th 




16 


W 


All classes join, 


15 


F 




17 


Th 




16 


S 


Guru Nanak's Birthday, H, 


18 


F 




17 


S 


24th Sunday after Trinity, 


19 


S 




18 


M 




20 


8 


20th Sunday after Trinity. 


19 


T 




21 


M 




20 


W 




22 


T 




21 


Th 




23 


W. 




22 


F 




24 


Th 




23 


S 




5 


F 




24 


8 


25th Sunday after Trinity. 


26 


S 




25 


M 




27 


"F 


21st Sunday after Trinity. 


26 


T 




28 


M 




27 


W 




29 


T 




28 


Th 




30 
31 


W 

Th 


\Diwali, H. 


29 
30 


F 

S 





ALMANAC, 





;V ' 


^ ' 


2 


h. 


General and Office. 


I 


tj 


General and Office. 


1 


s 


Advent Sunday, 


1 


W 


New Year's Day. 








2 


Th 




2 


, M 


/Confidential Report on R. E. officers. Rent 
< Boll, to Pay and Account* Officer, Educa- 
( tion Department, United Provinces. 






' Call for terra examination question 
papers. 
Educational Certificates of students pro- 












visionally admitted to be called for. 


3 


T 






^ 


Rent Roll to Pay and Aacounts Officer, 








3 


# 


Education Department, United Pro- 


4 


W 








vinces. 












Convictions under Factory Act for the 


5 


Th 








previous year to be vnt to the Inspector 












^ of Factories. 


6 


F 
















4 


8 




7 


S 










i 






_ 




Epiphany of our Lord. 


IT 


3 


1st Sunday in Advent. 




(J 


M 




9 


M 




7 


T 


Guru Gobind Singh's Birthday. H. 


10 


T 
















S 


W 




11 


W 




( 


Th 


|Term examination question papers to be 


12 


Th 


Durbar Day. 


10 


F 


I given in. 


18 


F 








Keturn No. 1 to be sent to the Inspector of 








11 


S 


Factories and Boilers, United Provinces. 


14 


S 




12 


3 


1st Sunday after Epiphany. 


IB 


~sT 


2nd Sunday in Advent, 


13 


M 




16 


M 




14 


T 




17 


T 




15 


W 


Shab-i-Barat, M. 


18 


W 




10 


Th 




19 


Th 


St. Thomas, A. & M. 


17 


F 




20 


F 




18 


>, 




21 


S 




"19" 


IT 


2nd Sunday after Epiphany, 


22 


8 


3rd Sunday in Advent. 


21 


M 
T 




29 


M 
















22 


W 




24 


T 
















23 


Th 




25 


W 


i Christmas Day. 
I St. Stephen, First Martyr. 


24 






26 


Th 


St. John, A & E. 


25 


S 




27 


F 


Innocents Day. 


26 


"IT 


3rd Sunday after Eoipnany. 


28 


S 




27 


M 










>c 


T 




29 


8 




29 


X 

W 




30 


M 
















30 


Th 




31 


T 




3) 


F 





ALMANAC. 







FRBJBUARY, 1980. 






MARCH,, 11)80 


I 


|i 


General and Office. 


1 


ij 


General and Office. 


1 


8 


f Stationery Indent due from Lec- 
turer in Drawing 
Bent Holl to Pay and Accounts 
{ Officer, Kducati-in Department, 


1 


s 


1 Order foung and rules for ton- 
trance Examination. 
Hpiit Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, 
Kdomtion Department, United Pro- 
vinces, 






United Provinces 
t Auction of grazing on College 


2 


s 








L* grounds. 


:J 


M 


I Quinquagesima, 


2 


IT 


4th Sunday after Epiphany. 


4 


T 


j Id-ul-Fitar. M, 


3 


M 


Term examination begins. 


5 


W 


Ash Wednesday. 


4 


T 




<> 


Th 




5 


W 


Basant Panchami. H. 


7 


F 














Ask for bill for 'surely of vrater from the 


6 


Th 




8 


8 


Executive Engineer, Ganges Canal. 


t 


F 


{Indent of forms to be sent to 


9 


s 


1st Sunday in Lent. 


8 


S 


Director of Public Instruction, 


10 


M 








United Provinces 


11 


T 




IT 


T 


5th Sunday after Epiphany. 


12 


W 




10 


M 


Second term begins % 


1 


Th 




11 


T 




14 


F 




12 


W 




15 




Holi, H, 


13 


Th 




16 


S 


2nd Sunday in Lent. 


14 


F 




;T 


M 




15 


S 




18 


T 


' 


IT 


s 




19 


W 




17 


M 


Seotuagesima, 


L'O 


Th 


j Write to Director-General, Obser- 
| vatoi ies for weather report. 


18 


T 




21 


F 




19 


W 




22 


S 




20 


Th 




23 


S 


3rd Sunday In Lent. 


21 


F 




24 


M 




22 


S 


f 


25 


T 




23 


3 


Sexages/wa. 


26 


W 




24 


M 




27 


Th 




25 


T 




28 


F 




26 


W 




29 


8 




27 


Th 


Sheoratri. H. 


30 


S 


4th Sunday in Lent, 


28 


F 


Lint Friday of Ramzan M. 


31 


M 

















ALMA IS' AC. 





APRIL, 1930. 


MAY, 1980. 


i 


Dajsof 
i the week. 


General and Office 


i 


1 


General and Office 






'Detailed Statement of Establishment sent 






'Arrange for question papers for Final 






to Pay and Accounts Officer, Education 






examinations being received by 15th 


1 


T 


Department, United Provinces. 
Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, Edu- 
cation Department, United Provinces. 
Arrange for question papers for Entrance 
I examinations being received by 1st May. 


> 


Th 


instant. Statistical Return. 
Letters regarding training of Apprentice 
Overseers sent out. 
I Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, 
Education Department, United Pro- 


2 


W 








vinces 
Papers for Entrance examination, Civil 


3 


Th 




2 


F 


I Engineer and Overseer Classes. 


4 


F 


Order Medals from Calcutta Mint. 


q 

* 


S 




5 


8 


Enquire appointments offered 
( for Engineers and Overseers. 








4 


S 


2nd Sunday after Easter. 


6 


S 


5th Sunday in Lent, 




6 


M 
T 




7 


M 
















7 


W 




8 


T 
















8 


Th 




9 


W 








( Requisition on Press for Certi 


10 
11 


Th 
F 




10 


S 


( ficates, etc., for prize-giving. 
Id-uz-Zuha, M, 


12 


S 


Hardwar Fair, H. 


IT 


3 


3rd Sunday after Easter. 








12 


M 




_ 

13 


IF 


Palm Sunday, 


13 


T 


( Call for Marking Sheets with names for 
| Principal to fill in marks. 


14 


M 




14 


W 




15 


T 




15 


Th 




16 


W 




16 


F 




17 


Th 




17 


S 




18 


F 


Good Friday. 


18 


3 


4th Sunday after Easter. 


19 


S 




19 


M 




20 


S 


Easter Sunday. 


20 


T 




21 


M 




21 


W 




22 


T 




22 


Th 




23 


W 


S. Georges, 


23 


F 




24 


Th 




24 


S 


Empire Day, 


25 


F 




25 


IF 


Rogation Sunday. 


*6 


S 




26 


M 












T 




27 


T 


1st Sunday after Easter 


28 


JL 

W 




28 


M 




29 


Th 


Ascension Day. 


29 


T 




30 


F 




SO 


W 
















31 


S 





ALMANAC, 



JUNE, 1930. 


JULY, 1930. 




of 






1 




5 


ssJ 


General and Office. 


5 


> 


General aud Office. 


(3 


aj 




& 


i3j 




1 


s 


Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, Edu- 
cation Department, United Provinces 


1 


T 


j Rent Roll to Pay and Accounts Officer, 
j Education Dept., United Provinces. 
I Fees paid to examiners. 






Annual estimated expenditure on stores 












from England tor coming year to be 


j 


W 








submitted to D. P. I., United Provinces. 








2 


M 


Entrance examination, Civil Engineer and 


3 


Th 








Overseer Classes. 












Revision work in quarters. 


4 


F 








Schedule of new demands to Director of 








3 


T 


Public Instruction, U, P. 

Kin%~Emperor'& birthday. 


5 


S 




4 


W 




6 


S 


3rd Sunday after Trinity. 


5 


Th 




7 


M 




6 


F 




8 


T 




7 


S 


9th DayofMoharram. M. 


9 


W 




8 


8 


\ Whit Sunday, 
\ 10th DayofMoharram. M. 


10 
U 


Th 
F 




9 


M 


j Final examinations begin. 
\ Circulars for admission to the 


12 


S 


1 Budget to be gent to Director of Pub 
I Instruction, United Provinces. 






( Classes to be printed. 








10 


T 




13 


8 


4th Sunday after Trinity, 


11 


W 




14 


M 




12 


Th 




15 


T 




13 


F 








{Vacation commences. Corrected 








16 


W 


copy of calendar to be sent to 


15" 






17 


Th 


Press for printing. 


8 


Trinity Sunday. 


16 


M 




18 


F 




17 


T 




19 


S 




18 


W 




20 


8 


5th Sunday after Trinity. 


19 


Th 
















21 


M 




20 


F 
















22 


T 




21 


S 




no 






22 


S 


fat Sunday after Trinity. 


Zo 












24 


Th 


.. 


23 


M 










24 


T 




25 


F 




25 


W 




26 


S 




26 


Th 




27 


8 


6th Sunday after Trinity. 


27 


F 




28 


M 




28 


S 




29 


T 




29 


8 


2nd Sunday after Trinity. 


30 


W 




30 


M 




31 


Th 





ALMANAC. 







AUGUST, 1930. 






SEPTEMBER, 1930. 


s . 

(3 


Days of 
the week. 


General and Office 


oJ 

1 


<4_ X 

o 
&^ 
a o 




General and Office, 


1 


F 

S 


/'Statement of non-gazetted officers over 55 
\ years of age or attaining that age to be 
< submitted to Director of Pub. Instruction. 
I Kent Roll to Pay and Account* Officer, 
\ Education Dept, United Provinces 


1 

> 


M 
T 


t Kent Roll to Pny and Accounts 
< Officei, Kduc'ation Department, 
1 United l j rovinceh. 


3 

4 

6 
6 


8 

M 
T 
W 


7th Sunday after Trinity. 


3 
4 



6 


Th 
F 

S 




7 
8 
y 


Tb 
F 

8 


Ban Wafat M. 


7 

8 

y 

1 n 


S 
M 

T 


12th Sunday after Trinity. 


10 

n 

12 

I,H 


S 

M 
T 
W 


8th Sunday after Trinity. 


11 

12 
13 


Th 
F 
8 




14 
15 
16 


Th 
F 
8 




14 

15 
](> 


S 

M 

T 
\if 


13th Sunday after Trinity. 


17 

18 
19 
20 


3 
M 
T 
W 


9th Sunday after Trinity. 


IS 
19 

20 


W 
Th 
F 

S 




21 
2 
23 


Th 
F 

S 




21 

22 
23 
24 


S 
M 
T 


14th Sunday after Trinity, 


24 

25 
26 
27 


8 
M 

T 
W 


10th Sunday after Trinity. 


25 
26 
27 


Th 

F 
S 




28 
29 
80 


Th 
F 

S 




28 

29 

30 


8 
M 
T 


15th Sunday after Trinity, 


31 


8 


11th Sunday after Trinity. 









ALMANAC 



NOVEMBER, 1930. 



UU1V ' ' 


' 


* 


J| 


G-eneral ami Office 




s 


! 






1 


w 


) 








\-Dasehra. H. 




2 


Th 


} 








| Kent Roll to Pay and Accounts 




3 


F 


<. Qfficer, Education Department. 








( United Provinces. 




4 


S 






5~ 


S 


16th Sunday after Trinity. 




6 


M 






7 


T 






8 


W 






9 


Th 






10 


F 




i 


11 


S 






T^ 


S 


11th Sunday after Trinity. 




13 


M 






14 


r 






15 


w 


Vacation ends. 




16 


Th 


Classes join. 




17 


F 






IB 


S 






19 


S 


18th Sunday after Trinity. 




20 


M 






21 


T 


Diwali. H. 




22 


W 






23 


Th 






24 


F 






25 


S 






26 


S 


19th Sunday after Trinity. 




27 


M 






28 


T 






29 


W 






30 


Th 






31 


F 







ADVISORY COUNCIL OF THE THOMASOK COLLEGE, 

THOMASON CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE. 



ADVISORY COUNCIL OP THE THOMASON COLLEGE. 



1. JWALA PRASADA, ESQ., I.S.E., CHIEF ENGINEER AND 

SECRETARY TO GOVERNMENT, IRRIGATION BRANCH, 
. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, UNITED PROVINCES, 
(PRESIDENT.) 

2. P. H. TILLARD, ESQ., I.S.E., CHIEF ENGINEER, BUILDINGS 

AND ROADS BRANCH, PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, 
UNITED PROVINCES. 

3. Vacant. REPRESENTATIVE OF THE INSTITUTION OF ENGI- 

NEERS, (INDIA). 

4. THE DIVISIONAL SUPERINTENDENT, EAST INDIAN 

RAILWAY, LUCKNOW. 

5. THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, UNITED 

PROVINCES, 

6. THE DIRECTOR OF INDUSTRIES, UNITED PROVINCES. 

7. THE PRINCIPAL, THOMASON COLLEGE, ROORKEE, < SEC- 

RETARY. ) 

8. DR. GANESH PRASAD, M.A., D.RC., M.L.C., NOMINEE OF 

UNIVERSITY OF ALLAHABAD. 

9. J. P. SRIVASTAVA, ESQ., M.SC., M.L.C,, NOMINEE OF THE 

UPPER INDIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

10. I. D. VARSHANI, ESQ., NOMINEE OF THE UNITED PRO- 

VINCES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 

11. RAJA RAM, ESQ., PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

(SANITARY,) THOMASON COLLEGE, ROORKKR. 

12. KHAN BAHADUR A. H. MIRZA, ELECTED BY THE NON- 

OFFICIAL MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIES, 
UNITED PROVINCES. 

13. MAULVI ZAHUR-UD-DIN, B.A., 

LL.B., M.L.C., BAREILLY. ( Rtpmcntattvea of tie 

14. PANDIT NANAK CHAND, M.A., 

LL.B., M.L.C., BULANDSHAHR. 



10 THOMASON COLLEGE STAFF, 



COLLEGE STAFF. 

16th October, 1929. 



LIEUT. -COLONEL E. \V. C. SANDES, P.S.O,, M.C,, R.E., M.I.B., (!NI>)., 

Principal. 



DEPARTMENTS. 

Civil Engineering. 

U. LACEV, n.sc. (Eng.) A.M.I.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 
I.S.E., 

MOHSIN ALI, B.A., M.SC., I.S.E., ... Professor of Civil Engineering. 

RAJA RAM, B.SC., A.M.I. C.E., P.I.S.B., Professor of Civil Engineering, 
M.I. MUN. & CY. E., A.M. I.E., (Iiid.). (on leave). 

PHUMMAN RAM, ... ... Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

Overseer Class. 

ABDUS S ATTAR KHAN, ... Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

Overseer Class. 

Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

B. D, PURI, M. A (Cantab), ... Professor of Pure and 

Applied Mathematics. 

PARMANANDA CHAKRAVARTI, M.SC., M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics. 
PROBODH CHANDRA SEN GUPTA, B.SC., ... Lecturer in Mathematics. 
NATHA SINGH, ... ... Instructor in Mathematics. 



THOMASON COLLEGE STAFF. U 

Surveying and Drawing. 

C. J. VEALE, F.U.A.S. F.R.G.S., Proi'essor of {Surveying and Drawing. 
Vacant, ... ... Lecturer in Drawing, 

LIEUTENANT J. 8. GuRNEY, F.B.I., Headmaster and Instructor in 
M. R.S.I., ... Surveying, Overseer Class. 

H. T. GUMMING, A.M. I.E. (!NI>.), Lecturer in Surveying and Drawing. 
RAM SAIIAI, ... ... Instructor in Drawing, Overseer Clas-, 

FRIT AM DAS, ... ... Instructor in Surveying and Drawing, 

Overseer Class. 

Applied Science. 

DK. P. P. PHILLIPS, PII.D., Professor of Applied Science and 
(GorriNGEN) F.I.C., i.E.B., ... Officer-in-chai'ge Civil Engineer 

Class. 

ANAND SARUP, M.HC., A.M.A.I.E.E,, Lecturer in Physics. 

KRISHNA LAL BEIATTACHARYA, ... Lecturer in Chemistry. 
M.SC,, 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 

MAJOR A. M. Me LEAN, M.C., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
A, M.I, MECH. E,, ... and Electrical Engineering. 

J. CRAWFORD, ... ... Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering. 

MUNNA LAL MISRA, A.M.I.E., (!ND.), Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

DHANPAL CHANDRA, ... Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering. 

SADHU SINGH, ... ... Foreman Carpenter, 

ASA RAM, ... ... Foreman Moulder. 

ABDUL RAHIM, ... ... Foreman Mechanic. 

BHAQWAN DAB, ... ... Foreman Blacksmith. 



12 



DIAL DAS MEHTA, 

W. J. PEYCIIEUS, ... 
Vacant, 
RAGHUNANDAN LAL, 

KUNDAN LAL, 
HIRA LAL, 
MOHAN LAL, 
SAMPAT RAI, 



THOMASON COLLEGE HTAFF, 

Photo, -Mechanical Press. 

... Superintendent, Photo.- Mechanical 

Press. 

... Assistant, Photo, -Mechanical Press, 
Assistant Photo,- Mechanical Press. 
.., Instructor. Draftsman Class. 

Office. 

Superintendent. 
... Head Clerk. 

Assistant Accountant. 
Curator, Book Depot. 

Librarian, 
Vacant. 

Personal Assistant. 
GoNint. J. BAHNKTT. 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION. It 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE THOMASON COLLEGE. 



THK Thomason College is a provincial institution maintained and 
controlled by the Government of the United Provinces, but students 
are admitted, under certain conditions, also from the Punjab, Central 
Provinces, Central India and Rajputana, and Burma, the Govern- 
ments of these provinces paying the cost of training their students, 
A few students are admitted annually from certain Indian States 
under special conditions. Every candidate for entrance is required 
to produce certain educational and other certificates before he is 
permitted to appear in the annual competitive entrance examination 
of his class. The competition is keen. Candidates are not admitted 
from the provinces of Bengal, Bombay or Madras, as these provinces 
have their own engineering colleges. Full details of the conditions of 
admission to the Thomason College appear in the Circulars of the 
various classes, obtainable from the College, These Circulars are 
included in this Calendar. 

The Thomason College now admits successful and fully qualified 
candidates to the following classes : 

() Civil Engineer Class. 

(b) Overseer Class. 

(c) Draftsman Class. 

The Course of Study in the College for each of these classes is 
given in the Course of Study and Syllabus pamphlet of the class, 
These pamphlets are obtainable, on payment, from the College Book 
Depot, and are included in this Calendar. The Civil Engineer Class 
course is of three years' duration, and candidates for it must not be 
under 17 or abov 21 years of age on the 1st June immediately 
preceding the competitive entrance examination which is bold annually 
in June, This rule is very rigidly enforced. The Overseer Class 



: GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

course is of two years' duration, and the age limits in this case are 16 
and 21 years under the same conditions. The Draftsman Class course 
is usually of three years' duration, and there are no age limits ; the 
qualifying educational standard for the entrance examination of the 
Draftsman Class is much lower than for the other classes, and the 
entrance examination standard also is lower. 

The Civil Engineer Class course approximates to the degree standard 
in engineering of a British University. The Thoniason College grants 
a diploma (certificate) on the successful completion of this course. 
The first year of the course is devoted mainly to pure mathematics 
and science, the second year chiefly to more advanced pure and 
applied mathematics, science, surveying, and some civil, mechanical 
and electrical engineering, and the third year almost entirely to civil 
engineering (including designs), with the addition of more mecha- 
nical and electrical engineering and surveying (including astronomy). 
An important test of a student's practical ability takes place in 
the third year, in which, after two preliminary projects which are 
corrected and criticized, a two months' engineering project is set 
by an outside examiner in Irrigation design or in some other branch 
of engineering design. The third year students go into camp for 
the first portion of this project period and each student works 
alone across country with his own instruments (theodolite, level 
and plane-table) and his gang of men, returning to Roorkee to 
complete his reports, designs, calculations, estimates and survey 
plates when he has finished his work in the field. This test, 
which carries a large number of marks, effectually eliminates the pure 
theorist from the upper half of the class, and brings to the fore the 
man of common sense, ability, character, and initiative. The Overseer 
Class students also execute a small project in Roorkee to test their 
practical ability. Before the end of each session, in June, there is a 
final examination, in which every student must qualify in the various 
groups of subjects studied during the session if he wishes to remain 
in the College. Mid-sessional examinations also are held in February. 
The College session begins on the 16th October and ends on the 15th 
July, being followed by a vacation of three months during the unhealthy 
monsoon period when out-door work would be impossible. At Christ- 
mas 10 days' leave are given. 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 15 

The College grants either a ' Higher ' or an * Ordinary ' Certificate 
to students, who successfully complete the College course, according 
to their totals of marks A successful Civil Engineer Class student, 
if he secures an appointment in Government .service, is usually posted 
as an apprentice (or student) to the Public Works Department for 
one year to learn practical methods of work and the control of labour, 
At the end of this year, if his reports are good, he is posted to the 
Public Works Department as an Assistant Executive Engineer, or 
an Assistant Engineer, on probation for another year. The more 
brilliant men usually enter the Indian Service of Engineers arid 
others the Provincial Engineering Service of their Province, or Indian 
State Service, while one or two may be posted to Indian Railways, 
Successful students from the Overseer Class may enter the Sub- 
ordinate Engineering Service of their Province, if vacancies exist, 
after a satisfactory period of practical training and probation of 
two years' duration as for the Civil Engineer Class men, or they 
may obtain other employment. An employment register H maintained 
for the benefit of any men who do not obtain employment, or aro 
out of employment. 

The probable current monthly expenses of a student are shown at 
end of the Circular of each class. It will be seen that the expenses of 
a Civil Engineer Class Indian student should not exceed Rs. 122/12/- 
per mensem while the College is open, and, of a European student, 
Rs. 177/-|- per mensem, and these figures include a College fee of 
Rs. 24J-/- per mensem and charges for rent, conservancy, furniture, 
recreation, servants and messing; but a Final Examination fee of 
Rs. 40/- is also required before a student leaves the College. The 
expenses of an Overseer Class Indian student are estimated at 
Rs. 42[-/- per mensem, including a College fee of Rs. 6/-/- per 
mensem. A number of scholarships are awarded in the Civil Engi- 
neer Class and Overseer Class. 

The Photo.-Mechanical and Litho. Department of the Thomason 
College ^the College Press) is located in a portion of the main build- 
ing and is under the orders of the Principal, though administered 
directly by a Superintendent. It is a commercial concern of Govern- 
ment, employing trained and paid workmen, but College students can 
undergo an optional course in Photography in the Press and are also 



16, OBNEBAL DE80H1PTION. 

trained in Process Work by the Superintendent. The Department 
carries out lithographic, photographic and other work for Government 
departments in India, as well as for private individuals, and its 
profits are credited to Government 

The Thomason College main building is large and spacious, and 
has laboratories, class rooms, and model rooms for the various de- 
partments. The equipment of instruments and apparatus is com- 
plete and up to date. The College Workshops are also well fitted 
with machinery and apparatus. The College has its own Dairy, 
Hospital, Book Depot, arid Meteorological Observatory, and an 
electrical supply system giving current for electric lights, fans and 
motors in the main building and same other buildings. The drinking 
water is pumped direct from enclosed wells into overhead reservoirs, 
while water for gardens and grounds is obtained from the Ganges 
Canal through a separate pipe system. All the pumps are operated 
electrically. The Civil Engineer Class and Overseer Class students, 
and some of the Draftsman Class students, live in Hostels grouped 
in rear of the College, and each student of the former class has a 
furnished room and bathroom. The Civil Engineer Class Indian 
students have a Club, and the European students a Mess. Most of 
the staff have detached bungalows with 4 gardens, A plan of the 
College, and a map of the Estate, appear at the end of this Calendar. 
Many facilities for recreation are provided for the students, i.e., a 
number of tennis courts, squash racquets courts, a football ground, 
hockey grounds, a cricket ground, and a large Boat Club on the 
Ganges Canal with rowing and sculling boats from Oxford. The 
students are encouraged to take part in all games and sports in order 
to fit them for their profession, and for their own benefit. Athletic 
Sports and a Regatta are held annually, and all Civil Engineer Glass 
students are now enrolled in the Indian Auxiliary Force, or the 
University Training Corps, for military training, while the Overseer 
Dlass students perform physical drill under a military instructor. 



HISTORY, 17 



HISTORY OF THE THOMASON COLLE6E, 



The Thomason College, the oldest engineering college in ludia, owes 
its birth to the waters of Mother Ganges. Without the River Ganges 
there would have been no canal of that name, and, without the canal, 
no college at Roorkee. The Ganges Canal soon reached maturity, but 
its offspring, the Thomason College, planned by men of wisdom and 
foresight, grew steadily from the smallest beginnings till it attained 
the proud position which it now holds as one of the leading educational 
institutions of the East with great traditions and a reputation second 
to none. 

The establishment of an engineering college at Roorkee was suggest- 
ed to the Honourable James Thomason, Lieut.-Goveriior of the N.-W. 
Provinces, about 1846, by Colonel Cautley of the Bengal Engineers, 
who had been Superintendent-General of Canals since 1886 and wa$ 
busily engaged in the scheme, first contemplated by Colonel Colvin of 
the same Corps, for the employment of the waters of the Ganges for 
irrigation. While there is no doubt that the immediate requirements 
of the Ganges Canal in engineer officers and subordinates were 
chiefly responsible for the foundation of the Thomason College, it is 
probable that broader issues also influenced the minds of Mr. Thomason 
and his advisers, and that an important point was the necessity for some 
systematic training for Civil Engineers in India, or at least in Northern 
India. The Western Jumna Canals were commenced in 1817, and the 
Eastern Jumna Canal in 1822, and in 1847 the annual expenditure 
on establishments for these undertakings was Rs. 1 ,04,000, and on 
annual repairs Rs. 85,000. In Dehra Dun, Rohiikhand, and near 
Delhi, works for drainage and irrigation were maintained requiring 
skilful superintendence. The roads from Jubbulpur to Mirzapur, the 



18 HISTORY. 

grand-trunk roads from Calcutta to Delhi and from Agra to Bombay, 
and the Land Revenue Settlement Survey, had been completed. It 
was apparent that there existed a large demand for skill in every 
branch of Civil Engineering. To meet this demand there were officers 
of the Army, European non-commissioned officers and soldiers, and 
there were Indians. To make these men efficient agents, the well- 
educated Europeans, lately arrived in the country, required instruction 
in Indian languages, and in the peculiarities of materials and construc- 
tion in India The European soldiers required scientific instruction, 
and the Indians, from their local experience and ability to bear 
exposure to the climate, were likely to prove efficient instruments if 
they wore well taught and inspired with n proper sense of responsibility. 

As early as the year 1845, Lieutenant Raird-Smith, of the Bengal 
Engineers, then Superintendent of the Eastern Jumna Canal, began 
training young Indians at Saharanpnr in Civil Engineering for the 
grade of Sub-Assistant Executive Engineer, and in 1846, twenty 
candidates were admitted to this class, In 1847, after the First Pun- 
jab War, Lord Hardinge, the Governor-General, determined on the 
vigorous prosecution of the Ganges Canal scheme. This undertaking, 
especially in the first few miles of its course, was beset with great 
engineering difficulties. Evidently it would tax to the utmost the 
skill, industry, and resources of the people and of the country. The 
science that was necessary to construct a woik of this magnitude would 
also be kept constantly in exercise for its maintenance, improvement, 
and extension. Immediate measures were necessary to provide a cons- 
tant supply of well-trained and experienced Engineers, and out of this 
emergency, the Roorkee College arose, later to be known as the 
Thomason College. The circumstance* which caused the selection of 
Roorkee as the site for the College were thus stated in the proposal 
made to the Governor-General on September, 23rd, 1847 : 

" The establishments now forming at Roorkee-, near the Solani 
Aqueduct on the Ganges Canal, afford peculiar facilities for instructing 
Civil Engineers. There are large workshops, and most important 
structures in course of formation. There are also a library and model 
room. Above all, a number of scientific and experienced officers are 
constantly assembled on the spot, or occasionally resorting thither. 



IS 

Those officers, however, all have their appropriate and engrossing duties 
to perform, and cannU give time for thai careful and systematic instruc- 
tion which is necessary for the formation of an expert Civil Engineer. 
On these accounts the Lieuieuant-Govenior would propose the establish- 
ment at Roorkeeof an institution for the education of Civil Engineers, 
which should be under the direction of the Local Government in the 
Education department," 

The proposal obtained the immediate and cordial support of the 
Governor -(Jeneiai in India. On October 19th, 1847, Lieutenant K. 
Maclagan, of tin; Engineeis,"* was appointed Principal of the College, 
and on November 25th of the same year a prospectus was issued, the 
establishment being fixed at a Principal, a Head Master, an Architectu- 
ral Drawing Master, and two Indian Teachers. The prospectus provided 
for three departments in the College. The First Department was for 
candidates for appointment as Sub- Assistant Civil Engineers. It was 
laid down that they must be under 22 years of age, must be able to 
read and write English easily, and must have a knowledge of Geometry, 
Algebra, Mensuration, Plane and Spherical Trigonometiy, Conic Sec* 
tions, and Mechanics, and the number to be admitted was 8 annually. 
The Second Department was for European Non-commissioned Officers 
and soldiers who had to pass an elementary test in Reading, Writing, 
simple Drawing and very easy Mathematics before admission. The 
number of admissions was limited to 10 annually, and these soldiers 
were trained to become Overseers in the Public Works Department. 
The Third Department was for young Indians desiring free instruction 
in Surveying, Levelling and Drawing. These men were required to have 
some knowledge of Arithmetic and to be able to read and write Urdu. 
Admissions were limited to 16 annually, and qualified men were given 
certificates on leaving the College. Annual examinations were held 
for all classes. It will be noticed that the lengths of the courses were 
not specified, but it is believed that the Second Department course 
lasted 6 months only. 

When Lieut. R. Maclagan was appointed as Principal in October, 
1847, not only were there no students, but there was no College. 



Father of Sir Edward Maclagan, Governor of the Punjab, 



20 HISTORY. 

The first students were admitted on 1st January, 1848, by the transfer 
of a few young Indians, who were being instructed by Major W, E. 
Baker of the Bengal Engineers, then Director of the Ganges Canal. 
These men apparently joined the Third Department, By August 
1848, ten non-commissioned officers and soldiers had joined the Second 
Department which was then complete, bat meanwhile, as no building 
was available, work was carried out in tents. A very small building, 
the fore-runner of the present Thoraason College, was built for use 
during the hot weather of 1848 and was demolished later when 
better accommodation was provided in the new College buildings. 
This little building contained 2 class rooms (26' X 3*2'), a Principal's 
Office 20' X 23', a Hall of the same size, and 4 small verandah 
corner rooms (16' x 12') for the Headmaster, Drawing Master, Book 
Depot, and Store, with verandahs on all sides. A plan of this 
miniature College known then as the Roorkee College hangs in the 
Thomason College corridor. The site of the building is unknown, but 
presumably it was near the site of the existing College, possibly 
where the Principal's residence now stands. Instructional work was 
interrupted, in the winter of 1848-49. by the Second Punjab War, 
when Lieut. Maclagan arid the military students were absent on 
service for about two months, or, as it was tersely put, " marched 
for the 'frontier." 

The year 1848 was an important one in the history of Roorkee. 
In this year, 12 years after the first line of the Ganges Canal levels had 
been taken, Lord Hardinge, then Governor-General, recommended 
the commencement of work on the Canal scheme with the utmost 
vigour, and the Ganges Canal may be said to originate from that time. 
The Canal Foundry Workshops were also established at Roorkee by 
Major Allen of the Bengal Army, in that year, and students of the 
Roorkee College attended there for practical instruction. In 1850, 
the number of Military students admitted to the College was increased 
to 15 annually, knd, on 7th April, 1851, there were 50 students of 
all classes and 42 men had already passed out. 

The year 1851 really marks the birth of the Thomason College as 
it now is. At the end of the Second Punjab War, the Roorkee 
College, with its then existing establishment and accommodation, was 



HISTORY. 21 

barely adequate for the instruction of the students, a:id was utterly 
inadequate to meet the exigencies of the occasion. Mr. Thomason 
at once grasped the situation and prepared a scheme for enlargement. 
This scheme provided for : 

1st The admission of officers, both of the Royal and Ea&t 
India Company's armies, to study at Roorkee in a class 
called the Senior Department. 

2nd The superintendence and improvement of the village schools 
around Roorkee, as feeders for the Third or Indian Depart- 
ment of the College. 

Srd The establishment, in connection with the College, of a 
Depot for Mathematical and Scientific instruments, and 
of a workshop for their repair and manufacture. 

4th -The formation of a Museum of Economic Geology. 
5th The erection of an Observatory for instruction. 

6th The maintenance of metal and stone Printing Presses with 
a book-binder's establishment, and all the necessaries for 
the publication of scientific works with appropriate draw- 
ings and illustrations. 

7th The enlargement of the College buildings and establish- 
ment to meet all these purposes. 

8th The doubling of the number of students in the Second and 
Third Departments. 

The original cost of the College buildings, etc., was estimated at 
Rs. 1,56,217, and the annual charge for the College at Rs. 83,898. 

A valuable record of the origin of the Thomason College, and the 
aims and objects for which it was established, is to be found in a 
pamphlet, dated October 3rd, 1851, drawn up by Mr. Thomason, 
Lieutenant- Governor of the North-Western Provinces. The exact 
date of the commencement of the construction of the new College- 
afterwards called the Thomason College is unknown, but it seems 
that the work must have been started in 1852. The officer who 
designed the main building was Lieutenant Price of the 1st Fusiliers, 
then employed on the Ganges Canal, who later became Chief En- 
gineer, Hyderabad. There is reason to believt, that Lieutenant Price 



22 HISTORY. 

also supervised the work of construction, vide Frontispiece, Volume 
III., of Colonel Cautley's Report on the Ganges Canal. It is very 
remarkable that a junior Infantry Officer should have been capable of 
designing and building so large au edifice as the Thomasou College, 
and producing an example of Renaissance architecture which seeins 
to be not unpleasing even to the eyes of professional architects who 
have visited Roorkee in modern times. The officers responsible for 
the selection and acquisition of the site for the Thomason College 
and its estate showed wonderful judgment and foresight. They 
acquired in time 865 acres of land, including the high ground on 
which the College itself was built facing the north, in which direction 
the main range of the Himalayas towers in snowy grandeur above the 
nearer hills and lesser ranges. The land was fertile, the water-supply 
ample, and the locality healthy, while, within a mile or two, some of 
the greatest engineering works in the world were in the process of 
construction. It is recorded that the construction of the College was 
nearing completion in 1854, and that all the original buildings, includ- 
ing the main building, were completed in January, 1856, so that a 
period of about 4 years was required for the work. The front of the 
main building, viewed from the north, was as it is at the present day, 
except that there was no clock ; but there were no rooms where the 
present Library and Convocation Hall exist only covered passages 
and the rear of the quadrangle was open except for a small model room 
and museum block in the centre. As time went on the College was 
enlarged. By 1878, the Library and Convocation Hall had been built, 
and by 1896, the rear of the College had been closed by providing 
rooms for Science Departments, while still later a second storey wah 
added over the south-east corner to accommodate the Photo. School 
of the College Press. Nevertheless it can be said that the Thomason 
College was completed, as then required, in January, 1856, though 
the rite had not the beautiful trees which now provide welcome shade 
around its lawns and gardens. 

Until the year 1854, the institution at Roorkee continued to be 
known as the " Roorkee College." but in that year the Honourable 
Court of Directors instituted a scholarship to be called the Thomason 
Scholarship, in memory of Mr. Thomason, and the Governor-General 
ordered the Roorkee College to be called the " Thomason College of 



HIITORY. 28 

Oiril Engineering'* in the following notification: 

No. 6. 
OUR GOVERNOR GENERAL OF INDIA IN COUNCIL. 

PUBLIC DEPARTMENT. 

London, 8th February, 1854. 

1. We entirely concur in the opinion you express, that it becomes 

the Government of India to institute 

N^Sod 1853 d 4 SubSng b l'or * orae enduring .memorial of the eminent 
Court's sanction a proposal for merits and services of Mr. Thomason, 
the foundation of a scholarship or , .,. , ,, , ,, ,. , ' 

prize at the Roorkee College, and we think that the object cannot be 
in memory of the late Mr. accomplished in a more appropriate 
T omason. manner than by connecting it with the 

College of Civil Engineering at Roorkee, 

2. We approve the proposal you have submitted to us, and authorize 
you to carry it out in such a way as may seem to you most suitable. 
At the same time, we are of the opinion that the opportunity should be 
taken of marking our sense of Mr. Thomason's public services, and of 
connecting his memory with Roorkee College in a still more emphatic 
manner. It appears to us very fitting that an institution of such peculiar 
importance to India, and of a character so entirely novel in that country 
should bear the name of its founder, and it is accordingly our desire that 
the College be henceforth designated the u Thomason College of Ciril 
Engineering at Hoorkee?\, 

3 . We direct that this change of name, and the reasons For it, be 
publicly notified in such form as you deem rnoat suitable. 

We are, etc., 

(Sd.) RUSSELL ELLICK, 
J. OLIPHANT, 
and other Directors. 



Si HISTORY. 

In 1856, when the Thomason College had been built, a Committee 
Was appointed by the Lieut.-Governor to enquire into the past working 
and present condition of the College, and to prepare a scheme for its 
extension to meet the demands of the Services. The recommendations 
of this Committee, most of which were approved in November, 1857, 
were not put into force at that time owing to the disorganization 
caused by the Indian Mutiny, but the more important alterations 
were carried out in the next year or two. These were as follows : 

1. A fixed date was introduced for admission to the Senior Depart- 
ment (Commissioned Officers ,, and the number for this department 
was fixed at 16. 

2, First Department. The non-stipendiary students were now 
styled the English Class, and their number fixed at 10. A general 
educational test was prescribed in addition to the mathematical 
test at the entrance examination. The stipendiary students were 
termed the Native Class, and an entrance test similar to that for 
the English Class was exacted. Students of the First and Senior 
departments were eligible for appointment as Probationary Assistant 
Engineers. 

8. Second Department. Military Class. The number of students 
was fixed at 30. The course, however, was only for one year against 
two in the other departments. 

Non-Military Class. No alterations were proposed for this Class, 
but Indian students were now admitted. 

4. Third Department. Vernacular. Various alterations in the 
syllabus, and the requirement of a knowledge of English, were 
prescribed for this departmtnt. 

5* An evening class for Indian workmen in Drawing, Geometry 
and Estimating was started. 

6. A Professor of Surveying was added to the staff, who was made 
Curator of the Instrument Depot; also a Professor of Practical 
Chemistry and Photography. 

7. A College Museum was started, with models from England. 

8. An Observatory was sanctioned. 

9. A Gymnasium was sanctioned, but was not provided till later. 

10. A soldiers' garden, and the grounds generally, were laid out 
improved, 



HISTOBY, 



25 



It. The Press was re-organized and enlarged. 

12. The young officers and non-commissioned officers and privates 
of the Sappers, stationed at Roorkee, were required to attend the 
College as far as their duties would admit. 

Colonel R. Maclagan, R.E., the first Principal, retired in 1860, 
being succeeded by Captain E. C. S. Williams, R.E., who, in turn, was 
succeeded by Major J. G. Medley, R.E., in 1863. The latter held the 
post of Principal till 1870. Fora few years there were no .great changes, 
but the College was expanding steadily, In 1863, when the number of 
students had risen to 88, a Professor of Experimental Science was ap- 
pointed. In 1 864, the College was affiliated (nominally) to the Calcutta 
University. The course for the Senior and First Departments was ex- 
tended to three years, unless a higher certificate was gained in two years. 
Eight students were guaranteed appointments as Assistant Engineers, 
and practically all officers from the Senior Department got employment. 
Second Depart me tit students still remained only one year in the College 
and passed into the Public Works Department, Military students as 
1st Grade, English Civilians as 1st or 2nd Grade, and Indians as 3rd 
Grade In 1866, a Mistry Class was formed, and also an Officers' 
Surveying Class for a 7 months' course in Military Surveying, Drawing 
and Field Engineering. In 1868, an Indian Military Class (3rd 
Department) joined the College for a 2 years' course. The names of 
the various classes were altered in 1870 by which time there were 231 
students. The Senior Department became the " Engineer Class " 
(Military and Civil), while the Second Department became the " Upper 
Subordinate Glass" and the Third Department the " Lower Subordi- 
nate Class," By 1 870, the Staff had greatly increased and consisted 
of a Principal, two Assistant Principals, a Professor of Experimental 
Science, and a Professor of Drawing. These officers were assisted by a 
staff of masters for the Upper Subordinate Class under a Head Master, 
and another staff for the Lower Subordinate Class. The increase in 
the number of students, and in the strength of the staff, between the 
years 1863 and 1870 was remarkable. By 1870, the Thomason 
College had become a large and important institution, but very few 
Indians of good education entered it ; indeed, between 1847 and 1873 
only 17 Indians passed out from the Engineer Class or its equivalent, 
the remainder being Europeans. 



26 fllSTQRY. 

Major A. M. Lang, R.E., replaced Colonel J. (}. Medley, RJ2., as 
Principal in 1871, and in the following year the Upper Subordinate 
Class course up to then lasting one year only was extended to two 
years. In 1878, the Central Instrument Depot, located in the College, wa 
transferred to the Canal Foundry Workshops, arid a new Class for 
instruction of men of the Guides Corps in Surveying and Drawing was 
started. About the year 1873, it became apparent that at last the more 
highly educated Indians had begun to realize the advantages of the 
Engineer Clas's, in which they could obtain an excellent education 
gratis, with the chance of a provision for life in a well-paid and 
honourable profession, This is shown by the fact that, between 1873 
and 1875, sixteen Indians passed oat of the Civil Engineer Class. 

The history of the College, since its establishment, may be said to IMS 
divided into four periods, and tbe year 1875 marked the close of the 
first period. The chief characteristic of this period was tbe pecuniary 
aid given by the Government to most students in the way of stipends, 
It was an era of pioneering in an untrodden country, and Government 
had to bear the cost of the journey. But it was also a period of great 
industrial development, and of great activity in the construction of rail- 
ways, canals, roads, and other aids to industrial enterprise. The public 
mind was opening to the benefits of public works, and to the advant- 
ages of Engineering as a profession. The result was that in 1875 
Government found it possible to restrict the financial help previously 
given to students, and to limit the number of guaranteed appointments 
to the Public Service. The years 1875 to 1896 may be termed the 
second period. During these years, though the pecuniary aid given to 
students was to a large extent done away with, most of them paid 
practically nothing for their education. The training, however, was 
confined chiefly to Civil Engineering, Surveying, and allied branches, 
and technical or industrial classes did not exist. Tbe years 1896 to 
1920 may be called the third period when all students, except soldiers, 
paid fe$s, and the College was deveipped greatly as a Technical 
Institute, much stress being laid on Industries and Science. From 
the year 1920 to modern times may be considered as the fourth period 
when the College reverted once more to the specialized training of Civil 
engineers and subordinates, relinquishing Industrial, and Mechanical 
and Electrical, classes which were found to interfere with tbe more 



HISfOET. *J 

advanced traitiinp in Civil Engineering necessitated by modern condi- 
tions and were unsatisfactory in a non-Industrial centre such as Roorkee. 

The Royal Indian Engineering College, at Cooper's Hill in Eng- 
land, which opened in 1871 and closed in 1906, had an unfortunate 
effect on the entry of students to the Engineer Class at Roorkee after 
1876, While 55 admissions to this class were made in 1876, only 
twenty were made in 1878, but the effect of Cooper's Hill College 
decreased later when more Indians appeared as candidates for entry. 
An entrance examination fee of Rs. 20/- was required for the first time 
in 1876. In 3878, Major A. M. Brandreth, R.E., succeeded Colonel 
A. M. Lang, R.E., as Principal. In 1881 the Guides Corps Class 
was thrown open to the whole Indian Army, and was called the Native 
Military Survey Class. In this year also, for the first time, marks 
were allotted for physical fitness and for proficiency in athletics. From 
the commencement of 1882 the entire financial responsiblity for the 
College was thrown on the Local Government. Under orders of the 
Secretary of State no Europeans, except Royal Engineers, were to 
be appointed as engineers in India, except undfcr his sanction, it being 
understood that Cooper's Hill College was to be the source whence 
they were to be recruited. Indians of pure Asiatic descent were to be 
given all vacancies in the Public Works Department, irrespective of 
the position they held after the final examination, European com- 
petitors only receiving, under special sanction, appointments for which 
Indians were unable to qualify. This provision was altered in 1886 
when guaranteed appointments were thrown open to all Statutory 
Natives of India. The Professorship of Experimental Science was 
abolished, and considerable reductions made in the staff, due probably to 
an anticipated permanent reduction in the number of Engineer Class 
students. 

Few events of importance seem to have occurred in the Thomason 
College between the years 1882 and 1894, except the abolition of the 
Military Section of the Lower Subordinate Class in 1885, the start- 
ing of a British Military Survey Class in 1888, and some changes in 
the Staff. Colonel A. M. Brandreth, R.E., retired in 1891 being 
succeeded as Principal by Colonel F. D. M. Brown, V.C. of the Indian 
Staff Corps; but the latter officer vacated in 1892 when Major J. 
CHbborn became Principal. The year 1894, however, is notable for the; 



28 HISTORY, 

fact that in that year the last men for many years passed out of the 
Engineer Class into the Imperial Service. The Provincial Service was 
formed, and the Thomason College, having been a provincial institution 
since 1882, all men from the Engineer Class entered the Provincial 
Service from 1894. This must have affected the entry to the College. 
In 1895, educational qualifying tests were introduced for permission to 
sit for the entrance examinations. 

In 1896 commenced the third period in the history of the College. 
The Lieut, -Govern or of the North- Western Provinces visited the 
institution. The College was reorganized, and from this time forward 
all students, except soldiers, paid fees for their education. This further 
extension of the commercial principle, far from injuriously affecting the 
College, added to its efficiency and activity. The number of applicants 
for admission exceeded the number who could be accommodated, and 
it became necessary to insist on a process of selection, whereby only 
those who stood highest in the competitive examination could be 
admitted. From this time forth the College did not alone concern 
itself with the education of engineers and their subordinates : its scope 
was extended so as to include Industrial and Technical education 
generally, the aim being to develop the College into a Technical Institute 
for the Provinces, which should control, stimulate, and inspire technical 
teaching of all kinds. 

The main points of this reorganization were : 

Firstly. The transfer of the administration of the College from the 
control of the Public Works Department to that of the Education 
Department thus emphasizing the fact that the College was not only 
intended as a nursery for the Public Works Department, but also to 
snpply the need for Technical education for the Provinces in general. 

Secondly. The extension of the course of students in the Engineer 
Class from two to three years, in addition to an apprentice year in the 
Public Works Department as Engineer students, before they were 
appointed Assistant Engineers. These, however, were not the only 
points of interest in the reorganization scheme, An era of great 
activity and expansion was inaugurated, A Committee of Manage- 
ment was appointed, and the College was affiliated to the Allahabad 
University, The first revised entrance examination, applicable to both 



HISTORY. 2$ 

English and Indian students, was held. A class was formed for 
Mechanical Apprentices, having a three-year practical course in the 
Workshops combined with theoretical education. An Industrial Class 
was started; this had also a three-year coarse, divided into 15 sections, 
including Press work, Photography, Photo. -Mechanical Processes, 
and Art Handicrafts. Students could take up one or more of these 
sections according to their capabilities. The affiliation to the Allahabad 
University, though nominally effected, was never actually completed, 
and in time it died a natural death as did the affiliation to Calcutta 
University in 1864. It is evident that the development of the College 
into a Technical Institute was started with the greatest vigour tinder 
the control of the Education Department. The Thomason College 
became an educational institution under that Department, and all 
important matters had to be referred to the Committee of Manage- 
melit, which became later the Advisory Council. In 1896, a clock 
was presented by H. E. Sir Bir Shumsher Jung, K.C.S.L, at a cost 
of Us. 2500/- and placed on the College dome. 

The next few years showed the progress of the College as a Technical 
Institute. The Technical and Scientific side was greatly strengthened, 
while the Civil Engineering side seelns to have remained as before. In 
1897 two Professors, two Instructors and a Demonstrator were appointed 
to the Staff, viz., a Professor of Mathematics (Mr. Tipple), and of 
Experimental Science (Mr. Sedgwick), an Instructor in Applied 
Science, a Technical Instructor and a Laboratory Demonstrator. A 
Chemical Laboratory was started. New Technical Workshops were 
sanctioned. In 1899 an Electrical Engineer Class WAS started. In 
1901 the new Technical Workshops, equipped with the latest machi- 
nery run by electricity, were built at a cost of Rs. 33,000. The 
Applied Science Laboratories were fully equipped. A Physical and 
Mechanical Laboratory was provided. The College Press was enlarged 
and remodelled, and an electrically operated water-supply system for 
the whole College was installed. Before the completion of all these 
alterations and additions, which were necessary to carry out the details 
of the reorganisation scheme of 1896, Colonel J. plibborn, C.I.E., 
1.3*0., went on furlough pending retirement in 1901, and his duties as 
Principal were taken over by Ca.pt. E. H. deV. Atkinson, R.E M (now 
Lt f *Ganerftl Sir Edwin Atkinson, K.B.E,, C.B., C.M.G., CJ.E.) who 



HIiTOttf. 

remained as Principal from 1902 to 1 SI 5 when he left the College (as 
Lt.-Colonel Atkinson, C.I.E , R.E.,) to proceed on active service 
during the Great War. A Council was created in 1901 to assist the 
Principal in regulating the courses of study and other matters which 
were recognised as outside the province of the Committee of Manage- 
ment. A sub-Committee of this Council, now called the Board of 
Studies, still performs these duties, though the Council itself has 
ceased to exisi|. The enlargement of the Thomason College between 
the years 1896 and 1900 may be judged by the facts that the number 
of classes increased from 8 to 25, the number of students from 185 
to 824, the fees from Rs. 4,121 to Rs. 16,784, and yet the yearly 
cost of the entire management fell from Rs. 1,48,261 to Rs. 1,82,064. 
The?e facts were pointed out by Sir A. P. MacDonnell, Lieut.- 
Governor, in a speech delivered at Roorkee, on the 6th November, 
1900, when he added that it was the object of Government to develop 
the Thomason College into a Technical Institute for the North- 
West Provinces and Oudh, which should control, stimulate, and inspire 
technical teaching of all kinds. Experience, however, showed later 
that advanced technical instruction was not easy at Roorkee, and 
could not be' given there except at the expense of higher civil 
engineering instruction. The Thomason College, with its 25 classes, 
was .becoming very complicated, though such expansion may have 
been expedient under the industrial and technical conditions then 
obtaining. 

Captain Atkinson, R.E., in 1902, set about the reorganization of 
the interior economy of the College. Fortnightly examinations a 
trial both to the staff and students were abolished. The session was 
for the first time divided into three terms, and the examinations 
grouped together at the end of each term. A new time-table was 
introduced and the allotment of marks re-arranged. The length of 
each atiendance, which had so far been invariably 3 hours, was 
changed to 1| hours, except for certain subjects such as Laboratory 
work and Drawing. The arrangement of the staff was altered. Each 
branch of study ^as placed under a Professor, with assistants who 
were regponsible for the teaching of that branch throughout the 
College, A Dairy was started in connection with the College 
Stores which bad been founded by the staff and students. In 



HISTORY. 31 

July the Collage was risked by the Lieuieu ant-Governor, Sir 
Digges La Touch, and as a result of his inspection, a number of 
much-needed buildings were sanctioned. In the early part of 1903, 
most of the^e buildings were completed. They included a building for 
the Stores and Dairy, a bazar, a central power-house, improvements 
to the quarters, new latrines, the completion of the system of drain- 
age, and a house for the Applied Science Instructor. A grant of 
Rs, 24,000 was sanctioned, to be spread over four years, for bringing 
the supply of Surveying instruments in the College up-to-date, In 
1904 further improvements in interior economy were made. The 
syllabuses for all the classes were revised and brought up-to-date. 
The list of text-books in use was revised, and recent and more 
approved methods of instruction in Geometry and Mechanics intro- 
duced. A start was made to equip a Mechanical Laboratory for 
the practical teaching of Mechanics. Instead of specified text- 
books for the Entrance examination of the Civil Engineer Class, a 
brief Syllabus was prepared for each subject and published in the 
Circulars. A Survey Class for Indian Officers of the Imperial Service 
Troops was held for the first time. The Mechanical Apprentice Class, 
which was started in 1896, was placed on a mqre practical basis, an 
entrance examination introduced, and the course altered to three years 
at College and two years as Indentured Apprentices in outside work- 
shops. The rules for the Draftsman and Computer Class were altered, 
and an examination in Drawing was held for men who had passed 
the Lower Subordinate Class Entrance examination but failed to 
obtain vacancies. An Instructor in Chemistry was appointed in 1904 
(Dr. P. P. Phillips, who was soon afterwards graded as Professor). The 
College Press was reorganized, the Typographic branch being reduced 
and the Lithographic branch developed. The terms of admission 
to the Industrial Apprentice Class were altered, the payment of 
scholarships in special cases being substituted for stipends. The 
College had indeed entered upon an era of strenuous reorganization and 
expansion. 

On the 8$ A^ril, 1905. H. E, the Viceroy, Lord Curzon, inspected 
the Thorn a^on College, and on the 7th March, 1906, the College was 
greatly honoured by a brief visit from Her Royal Highness the Princess 



88 HIBTOEY, 

of Wales (now Her Majesty Queen Mary), who afterwards presented 

portraits of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales and herself to the College. The 

Lieutenant-GovernorSir J. J. D. La Touche,- visited the College 

during 1905. A Professor of Surveying and Drawing, and a 

Demonstrator in Chemistry, were added to the staff in 1905, and 

Mr A. M. McLean joined the staff as an Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering in 1906. In the year 1907, a large scheme for the 

farther development of the College as a Technical Institute was 

sanctioned. The Lieutenant-Governor at that time Sir John 

Hewett was greatly interested in industrial and technical education. 

An electric light, fan, and telephone system was installed in the 

College main building, the Workshops, and the Principal's residence. 

New engines of ample power were laid down. A Technical Class 

was started, and the Mechanical Apprentice Class enlarged. To meet 

these* increases, additional hostel accommodation was built, the work. 

shops doubled in size, new class rooms built, additional staff entertained, 

a new water-supply inaugurated, and last, but not least, new laboratories 

for the College sanctioned at a cost of Rs. 94,000. In the following 

year (1908), the buildings sanctioned in the expansion scheme were 

practically finished and the new engines and water- works installed. 

An Automobile Driver Class was started and good progress was made 

at 'first in training driyers. The Calcot Reilly Memorial Fund from 

the late Cooper's Hill College was handed over to the College to 5e 

given for Applied Mechanics in the Civil Engineer Class. Mr. C. 

J, Veale joined the College Staff in 1908 as Professor of Surveying 

and Drawing. The new accommodation for the Photo.- Mechanical 

Department (the College Press) was completed in 1909, and in this. 

year the late expansion of the Professorial staff necessitated a scheme 

to provide new and better staff bungalows. A site in the vicinity of 

Malikpur Village was acquired, and the village removed to Khanjarpur. 

In October, 1909, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, Sir John 

Hewett, visited the College and opened the new laboratories, additions 

to .workshops, and the electrical and power installations and a new 

dSifole storeyed hostel. A sub-committee of the College Council was 

formed into a Board of Studies to advise on all matters connected with 

courses, examinations, and time-tables. In 1910 the Technical Class 

was abolished and arrangements made to form a department of Techno* 



88 

logy. Major Hi B. D. Campbell, R.E., (Assistant Military Principal) 
left thfe College in 1 which 1 he had served since 1897, and was re-placed 
by Captaiti E. W. C. Sandes, R,E,, who joined as Professor of Civil 
Engineering on the abolition of the post of Assistant Military 
Principal. Mr. H. JP. Jordan also joined as Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. An elaborate educational plant of Cotton Machinery 
was installed in the College Workshops, with an expert instructor in 
charge of the Cotton Class. Five houses were built in 1910 and 
191 1 for College professors on the Malikpur estate, though not taken 
into use till late in 1912. A Department of Technology was formed 
on revised lines to consist of ( 1 ) a Higher Division, (2) a Lower Division 
(Mechanical Apprentice Class), (3) an Automobile Driver Class. 
Marks, throughout the College, were re-arranged, and few papers were 
valued at less than 100 marks. Special grants were assigned for 
Survey equipment and Workshops equipment. 

A large Textile Department building was built in the Workshops 
enclosure in 1911 and 1912: all the cotton machinery was erected 
in it. This is the building now outside the Workshops enclosure 
which was converted later for use by the Overseer Class and stafi as 
classrooms and offices, and known as the Overseer Class Annexe. 
The Automobile Driver Class was transferred to Lucknow. This 
transfer marked the beginning of the gradual diminution of all 
Technical and Industrial classes in the Thomason College and its 
reversion from a Technical Institute into a purely Civil Engineer- 
ing institution as it is to-day. In 1913 nine Anglo-Indian students 
joined the Textile (Cotton Spinning and Weaving) Class, but the 
Class did not seem to be a success. After a few years admissions 
to it ceased at Roorkec, and later the Cotton Machinery was 
transferred elsewhere. In 1914 admissions to the higher division 
of the Department of Technology at Rcorkee ceased, and the lower 
division (the Mechanical Apprentice Class) was transferred to Luck- 
now, so that both these classes BOOH ceased to exist in the College. 
These changes marked a further step in the reversion of the College to 
a Civil Engineering institution, though, in 1914, a Mechanical and" 
Electrical Engineer Class was started and was maintained for a tiin& 
la 1918 the Public Services Commission, under Lord Islington, visited 
the College. There were no other events of much import^ce in the 



34 HISTORY. 

College in the years 1913 and 1914. The institution developed 
gradually in different ways, but in a calm and peaceful atmosphere 
rudely broken in August, 1914, by the world-wide catastrophe of the 
declaration of War. 

When the Great War commenced, the College was in vacation, 
but in October, 1914, when it re-opened, great enthusiasm and 
patriotism were shown by the staff and students who subscribed 
Rs. 2,500|- towards the Imperial Relief Fund and followed daily the 
progress of the war on maps hung in the College corridor. Mr. B. M. 
Mukerjee, Professor of Physics, volunteered in 1914 for service in 
the X-ray section of the General Hospital and left for active 
service in the Western ^theatre, not returning until 1920. Captain 
E. W. C. Sandes, R.E., proceeded on active service to Mesopotamia 
in March, 1915, where he was captured with the 6th Indian Division at 
Kut-el-Amarah in April, 1916, after a siege lasting five months, and 
was a prisoner-of-war in Turkey thereafter till the end of the war in 
1918. The Principal, Lt.-Colonel E. H. deV. Atkinson, C.I.E., 
R.E,, proceeded to England in July, 1915, where he was appointed 
C.R.E. of a Division and rose to be Chief Engineer of the 4th Army 
on the Western front before the end of the war with the rank of 
Major-General and many decorations. Mr. E. F. Tipple officiated 
as Principal till October, 1916, in his absence. Mr. H. P. Jordan, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Mr. A. M. McLean, 
Instructor in the same Department, obtained commissions in the 
Indian Army Reserve of Officers and left on military service in May, 
1915 and August, 1915, respectively, Mr. Jordan returning, invalided, in 
October, 1915, and Mr. (then Major) McLean, M. C., in 1 920 after ser- 
vice in Mesopotamia and staff employment in India. Mr. E. IS. Griffith, 
an Instructor, obtained an I.A.R.O. commission in May, 1917, and 
Mr. G. Lacey, who joined the College as Professor of Civil 
Engineering in November, 1915, also obtained a commission in 1917, 
and both left the College. Many European students, who were 
passing out of the College, received commissions, and the names of 
those (students killed in the War appear on a brass memorial tablet 
in the College. It is evident that the War took a heavy toll of the 
College Sta|E, and instruction became increasingly difficult. Funds 



HISTORY. 55 

were also scarce, so that any large expansions had to be postponed 
till better times. Nevertheless the instructional work continued. 
The Public Works Department assisted the College by recommending 
the appointment as Principal of Mr. W. Gunnell Wood, C.S.I., late 
Chief Engineer, Buildings and Roads Branch, United Provinces, and 
this appointment was made in October, 1916. Sir James Meston, 
Lieut.-Governor, visited the College in February, 1916. 

The Public Work? Reorganization Committee visited the Thomason 
College in 1917, and in Julv of that year His Honor the Lieut.- 
Governor of the United Provinces, Sir James Meston, presided at 
the annual Convocation. The Indian Defence Force came into 
existence, replacing the Mussoorie Volunteer Rifles, and all British 
subjects in the College were enrolled in the new formation. Admis- 
sions to the Textile Class ceased in 1918, but the class was not 
transferred finally to Cawn pore till January, 1920. The declaration 
of the Armistice was duly celebrated in November, 1918, and 
the College settled down to consolidate its position in the 
difficult times which succeeded the War when political unrest in 
certain districts, and lack of fundfl for new schemes, rendered the task 
of Government no easy one. Mr. E. F. Tipple, Professor of 
Mathematics, vacated his post in April, 1919, after 22 years' service 
at the College during which he twice officiated as Principal. fn 
February, 1920, Major E. W. C. Sandes, D.S.O., M.C., R.E , re-joined 
the College Staff, from leave after the War, as a Professor of Civil 
Engineering, and subsequently officiated as Principal for several months 
during the absence on leave of Mr. W. G. Wood, C.S.I. During" 
1920 and 1921, the College suffered heavily through the deaths 
of Mr. F. W. Sedgwick, Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Physics, who had served on the College Staff for 23 years, and Sub- 
Conductor G. E. Lansley, Personal Assistant to the Principal, on 
22nd March, 1920, and 6th October, 1921, respectively. Mr. W. L. 
Stampe, I.S.E., was appointed as a second Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering in November, 1920, and Mr, J. M. Salusbury Trelawny as a 
third Professor in October, 1921. There were many changes in the 
superior staff at this time, due to the altered conditions after the 
close of the War and the retirement of officers who had carried on the 
work ably during the Wat. 



?6 HISTORY, 

It is not proposed, in this history, to tfeal with changes of sfcaff 
other than Professorial staff, except in unique cases, and, as regards 
Professors, merely to mention the times of their first appointments and 
dates on which they vacated their posts finally. Officiating appoint- 
ipents, and those owing to leave vacancies, are too numerous and would 
make tjie history n.n widely. Reference to the Annual Report at the 
end of the Calendar of any year will show in detail the changes in the 
gtaff during that year. For easy reference a List of Principals follows 
this History in the Calendar, and also a list of Convocation Presidents, 
i.., officers who presided at the Annual Comocations and Prize-givings. 
A further list of very distinguished Visitors is added. Many other 
senior officials have also visited, and continue to visit, the College ; 
the Annual Report of each year shows their names, and, needless 
to say, the College welcomes such indications of their interest in it. 

A complete Reorganization Scheme for the Staff of the Thomason 
College, dated the 12th July, 1919, was drawn up in that year by the 
Committee of Management of the College to suit the new requirements 
of Government under the Reforms Scheme and the new policy laid 
down for the future of the College, and it was duly submitted to the 
Secretary of State. The scheme was necessitated by the proposal to 
close down certain classes in the College as mentioned hereafter. The 
Committee of Management proposed certain modifications of the 
original scheme in May, 1920, and final sanction to the amended 
scheme was accorded by the Secretary of State on 29th January, 1922. 
After 1920, admissions to the Upper Subordinate, Lower Subordinate, 
Industrial Apprentice, and Mechanical and Electrical Engineer Classes 
ceased. It had been decided finally that the training of Mechanical and 
Electrical specialist students, and Industrial and Technical students, 
was not suited to Roorkee, and this decision marked the end of the 
scheme to develop the Thomason College as a Technical Institute. 
The cessation of recruitment to the Upper and Lower Subordinate 
Classes, and the consequent disappearance of the last students of these 
classes in July, 1922, was hrought'about by changes in the organization 
of the Public Works Department under which many sub-divisions were 
to be in the charge of Assistant Engineers (Provincial Service) instead 
of Upper Subordinates. This scheme made it advisable to train sub- 
otereeers to a standard higher than the Lower Subordinate CJass a 



87 

for the new Subordinate .Engineering Service. Hence, when 
the tipper Subordinate and Lower Subordinate Classes were to be 
abolished in the College, a scheme was prepared to replace them by a 
new Qwseer Class of intermediate standard. The new Overseer Class 
was .approved, and the first students were admitted in October, 1922, for 
a 3 years' course, 40 vacancies being offered annually for competition, 
This 8 years' course was later reduced to 2 years. The former Lower 
Subordinate Class Staff was tranpf erred to the Overseer Class, but 
later the instruction was supervised and assisted also by the Lecturers 
of the Civil Engineer Class. It was originally intended that the 
Overseer Class should be located at Roorkee only until buildings were 
ready at Lucknow to accommodate it. The last students of the 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineer Class and the Industrial Appren- 
tice Class passed out of the College in July, 1923, but a class for 
Draftsmen was retained and still exists. A batch of 20 Military 
students was admitted to the College in January, 1922, as a special 
case, to meet the requirements of the Military Engineer Services 
(old M. W. S.) for a short course of training approximating to 
that ot the abolished Upper Subordinate Class with due regard to 
the shorter duration. This batch left the College in July, 1923. A 
second batch of ten Military students only was admitted in October, 
1922, and passed out in July, 1924, and with that batch the class 
ceased to exist in the Thomason College, and all College students 
have since then been civilians. 

In the year 1921, the College Committee of Management was re- 
place I by an Advisory Council, constituted under GKO. No. 1578/XV- 
312, dated the 10th July, 1920. The last meeting of the Committee of 
Management (45th) was held on the 9th July, 1920, and the first 
meeting of the Advisory Council on the 17th February, 1921. The 
Council was formed with 10 members as compared with 7 members 
constituting the. Committee, but the number of members in the Council 
has since increased. The status of the Thomason College was improved 
owing ,to the Government of India offering to the Civil Engineer Class 
10 or 9 vacancies in alternate years, in the Indian Service of Engineers, 
as guaranteed appointments. This step, by which employment in the 
Imperial Service was again thrown open to highly qualified students, 
was a return to the practice in vogue up to 1894 wh^en students 



88 HIBTOBY. 

could pass into that Service. The constitution of the Indian Defence 
Force was changed in 1921 to the Auxiliary Force (India), and the 
College detachment (Europeans) became a part of the Mussoorie 
Battalion, being organized as a Machine Gun Section. As increased 
accommodation for Professors was required, one thatched bungalow 
almost opposite the Royal Engineers Mess was replaced by a pukka 
building in 1920, and in 1921 the construction of a pukka bungalow 
was commenced opposite the Royal Engineers Mess and another 
further east. In October, 1921, Mr. W. G, Wood, O.S.I, vacated 
the post of Principal and was succeeded by Major E. W. C. Sandes, 
D.S.O., M.C., R.E. 

His Excellency the Governor of the United Provinces, Sir Harcourt 
Butler, K.C.S.L, 0,1. E., presided at the College Convocation and 
Prize-giving in July, 1922. In this year a Committee was appointed 
by Government to inspect the College Press with a view to possible 
economies through the transfer of the control of the Press to the 
Superintendent of the Government Press, Allahabad (then Mr. Abel). 
Though the Committee recommended the transfer, the Advisory Council 
was averse to it, and Government accepted the opinion of the Council, 
The two new bungalows for Professors were completed in 1922, and 
funds were given for the transfer of the Textile (Cotton) Machinery to 
Cawnpore and the conversion of the Textile Building into an Annexe 
for the Overseer Class instruction. The benefits of the sanctioned 
Reorganization Scheme were felt in this year. All members of the 
instructional Staff were allowed rent-free quarters from October 1922, 
and salaries were improved. Mr. H. P. Jordan, Professor of Mechani- 
cal Engineering, then on leave, was transferred to the Poona Engineer- 
ing College in October, 1922. Mr. Dhawan, Mr. Raja Ram, Mr. B. D. 
Puri, and Mr. Shiv Narayan, joined the Staff as Professors of Civil 
Engineering (Railways), Civil Engineering (Sanitary), Mathematics, 
and Electrical Engineering and Physics respectively; also Mr. 
Chuckerbutty as Assistant Professor of Surveying and Drawing. But 
Mr. Shiv STarayan aud Mr. Chuckerbutty were transferred elsewhere 
after one Session and ,the posts remained vacant, and Mr. Dhawan 
also left in October, 1928. 

His Excellency Sir William Harris, K.C.S.L, K.C.I.E., who 
succeeded Sir Harcourt Butler as Governor, presided at the Convoca- 



HISTORY. 39 

tion in July 1928. This occasion was unique in that the Governor of 
the Punjab, His Excellency Sir Edward Maclagan, K.C.S.I., C.I.E., 
was also present, and distributed the prizes at the request of Sir 
William Harris. Sir Edward Maclagan had been invited in view of 
his connection with the College through his father, Colonel R, Maclagan, 
R.E., who was the first Principal. A portrait of Colonel Maclagan, 
presented by His Excellency Sir Edward Maclagan in commemora- 
tion of his visit, hangs in the Convocation Hall. Mr. 0. J. Veale, 
Professor of Surveying and Drawing, officiated as Principal for a 
period of six months in 1923, (including the College vacation) in the 
absence of Major Sandes and Dr. P. P. Phillips. In November, 
1923, sanction was given to the formation of one Platoon of the 3rd 
(Allahabad) Battalion of the University Training Corps (Indian 
Territorial Force) at Koorkee, thus enabling the Indian students to 
undergo military training for the first time. Applications for enrol- 
ment far exceeded the vacancies, and there was great keenness. Un- 
fortunately the strength of one Platoon did not allow of the actual 
enrolment of more than one half of the Civil Engineer Class students, 
but the remainder received military drill instruction. The Overseer 
Class students continued to receive instruction in physical drill. 

Major-General Sir Edwin Atkinson, K.B.E., C.B., C.M.G., C.I.E,, 
Master General of Supply and a former Principal of the College, 
presided at the Convocation in July, 1924. During this year the 
grant for repairs was increased and much necessary and overdue work 
was carried out, including re-roofing the College bazaar buildings, and 
the completion of new out-build ings and the re-roofing of servants quar- 
ters. Dr. P. P. Phillips, on return from leave, officiated as Principal 
from October, 1923, till the return from leave of Major E. W. C. 
Sandes, in October, 1924. A Special Committee was assembled by 
Government at Roorkee in December, 1924, to investigate certain 
matters connected with the syllabuses, courses of study, and staff, of 
the Thomason College, arising out of the introduction of the Beorgani- 
zation Scheme of 1919. A very comprehensive report was submitted 
by this committee in 1925 which was subsequently dealt with, 
item by item, by the Advisory Council whose recommendations caused 
Government to sanction several useful alterations and innovations 
in the College courses. Mr. A. C. Vemeres, C.I.E., Chief Engineer, 



Building* and Roads Branch, Public Works Department, United 
Provinces, an old student of the College, presided at the Convocation 
in July, 1925. this being the first instance of a past student 
performing this duty, An extension of the Indian Engineer Clasd 
Clnh was put in hand, and also several internal alterations in the 
College itself and in hostels, and re-roofing of certain bungalows with* 
jack-arches. A very fine steel model of a Plate^Girder bridge span/ on 
a large scale, was presented to the College by Messrs. Burn and' Co;, 
Howrah, and installed in one of the College model rooms which have 
been developed into useful instructional departments, Mr. R. A 
Bradshaw-Simth. I.S.E , joined the Staff as Professor of Civil 
Engineering (Irrigation) in 'February, 1925, Mr. L. E. Dawson 
having acted temporarily since Mr. W. L. Stampe vacated the post 
in October, 1924. 

The President at the College Convocation in July, 1926, was His 
Excellency Sir Malcolm Hailey, K.C.S.L, C.I.E., Governor of the 
Punjab. He was invited to preside because the Punjab had, of late 
years, been so largely represented in the College. Indeed, the Punjab 
candidates for the Civil Engineer Class had become as numerous as 
those from the United Provinces, the Punjab paying the expenses of 
the training of every duch candidate who gained admission, though 
admissions were limited. The Board of Studies, in 1926, formulated 
proposals for the improvement of the Overseer Class course and in- 
struction. A grant was given by Government for the purchase of 
additional plant for the College Workshops which lacked modern 
generating machinery. Two vestibules, one class room and three offices 
were re-roofed in the main College building, and also certain servants 
quarters and small outhouses. Another Lecturer's bungalow* was 
re-rooted with jack-arches. 

The Convocation President in July, 1927, was Mr. B. D'Q. Barley, 
C.LE., I.8.E., Chief Engineer, Sarda Canal, and Secretary to Govern- 
ment, United Provinces. Public Works Department, Irrigation Branch. 
Mr* bajig Ram, I.8.E., an old student, joined the Stuff in June, 1927, 
AS Professor of Civil Engineering. The College was grieved to learn 
of the dath oi: a distinguished past student, Sir Ganga Ram. During 
the summer a new flag staff was erected in front of the College. 
Ibis brkf history hairing now been written up 'to the endofth* 



HISTORY. 41 

College Session of 1926-27, a period of 80 years since the 
foundation of the Thomason College in 1847 it may be well to 
continue it year by year in the form of a Sessional Diary including 
the preceding vacation, i.e., by yearly periods from the 15th July to 
the 1 5th July, and this system will henceforth be adopted. It should 
be realised that all facts and events cannot be recorded in the History, 
but only those of importance. 

Session 1927-28. A great event in the Session 1927-1928 was 
the visit of His Excellency the Viceroy, Baron Irwin of Kirby 
Underdale, G.M.S.I., G.M.I.E , to the Thomason College on the 
llth April, 1928. His Excellency and Staff detrained in the 
early morning, motored round the College estate, and then visited 
the Workshops and inspected the College, and later inspected also the 
College Press before departing by motor for Dehra Dun His 
Excellency inspected a Guard of Honour of the College students, and 
was photographed with the staff, students, and visitors. He expressed 
himself as much gratified with all he saw, and presented a photograph 
to the Principal, an enlargement of which appears in the College 
entrance. The honour of this visit was greatly appreciated by the 
College as a whole, and particularly since no Viceroy had visited the 
institution since Lord Curzon came in 1905. His Excellency the 
Viceroy was pleased to enter the following remarks in the College 
Visitors' Book : 

" It gave me great pleasure to visit the Thomason College today 
and to see with my own eyes the institution which has turned out so 
many famous engineers. The equipment was obviously of a high stand- 
ard, and the curriculum appeared to me very comprehensive and wisely 
drawn for its purpose. I was greatly impressed by all 1 saw, and by 
the many evidences of the way in which Colonel Sandes and his Staff 
are carrying on the work. 1 am very grateful to him for giving me so 
interesting and instructive a mornjng, and to him, as to the College 
and its students, I can wish nothing better than that the College may 
maintain the 'high standard and tradition which is associated with its 

name. T 

IRWIN, 

The Principal, Lt.-Col. E. W. C. Sandes, D.8.O., M.C., R.E., 
was placed on deputation for one month in November, 1927, with 



42 HISTORY. 

the Rangoon University to advise about the Engineering College 
at Rangoon, and he proceeded to Burma for' this purpose. The 
Civil Engineer Class students passing out of the Thomason College 
in July, 1928, were the first batch for many years to whom the 
Government of India guaranteed no appointments in the Indian 
Service of Engineers, such guarantee having been withdrawn in the 
case of students entering in October, 1925, and thereafter. The 
entrance examination to the Civil Engineer Class in June, 1928, was 
also the first examination conducted under a revised syllabus of a 
higher standard than formerly, with the approval of Government and 
the Advisory Council, and stipulating also a higher qualifying standard 
than before for permission to sit for that examination, t>., the Inter- 
mediate, or equivalent standard, in place of the Matriculation or 
equivalent. It was anticipated that this raising of standards would 
cause a marked decrease in the number of candidates, but such is the 
reputation of the Thomason College, and the prospects offered to 
students,' that this was not the case. Indeed 203 candidates, who 
were qualified under the new rules, entered for the examination in 
June, 1928, in competition for the usual 30 ordinary annual vacancies 
in the Civil Engineer Class. In the Overseer Class 236 candidates 
entered for 40 vacancies. During the summer of 1928 most of the 
College Staff benefited by the recent completion by the Public Works 
Department of temporary lines on the College estate for the supply of 
electric current from Bahadarabad. Consumers made their own arrange- 
ments for temporary internal wiring and fittings, pending permanent 
arrangements, but were able to draw current, on payment, from the Public 
Works Department through the sub-station erected in 1927 on the 
College estate. The students' Mess and Club similarly benefited. 
The first P. W. D. Power Installation at Bahadarabad was completed 
in 1913 and was arranged to supply alternating current to the Canal 
Head works at Bhimgoda only, the alternators being driven by turbines 
operated by canal water. In 1924-26, however, the power station 
was greatly enlarged, alternative plant was installed, and the 
electric supply given to Hardwar and adjacent places. A line 
was laid also to supply the whole of Roorkee, including the 
College, part of whose electric current now comes indirectly from 
its, parent, the River Ganges, The new water-supply system for the 



HISTORY. 48 

College estate, however, could not be installed as funds were not 
available. A very large steel model road bridge of Baltimore Truss 
type, with overhead bracing, was received during 1927 from Messrs. 
Burn find Co., Howrah, and placed in the Bridges model room during 
the Session 1927-28, complete with framed diagrams and calculations. 
Most of the cost was generously met by the firm. The liquidation 
of the College Stores was completed, and Messrs. Murray and Co., 
Lucknow, started a branch establishment on the College estate. The 
staff and students of the College learnt with the deepest regret on the 
17th June, 1928, that His Excellency the Governor of the United 
Provinces, Sir Alexander Muddiman, Kt., K.C.SJ., C.I.E., had died 
on that day. His Excellency had undertaken to preside at the Annual 
Convocation in July, 1928. In consequence of this tragic event, 
Mr. A. H. Mackenzie, C.I.E., Director of Public Instruction, 
United Provinces, presided at the Convocation and distributed the 
prizes and certificates. This function brought to a close a notable 
Session the first since 1905 in which the College had been 
honoured by a visit from a Viceroy. A silver challenge cup, to be 
awarded annually to the best student in Games and Sports, was 
donate'd to the College by the Principal, Lieiit,- Colonel E. W. C. 
Sandes, and was presented to the first winner at the Convoca- 
tion, together with a miniature cup. Another silver challenge cup 
was donated by Mr. B. D. Puri, Professor of Mathematics, for 
Squash Racquets Doubles, and a third cup by Mr. J. Barnett, Per- 
sona) Assistant to the Principal, for the Overseer Class in the 
Athletic Sports. These cups were also presented at the Convocation. 
A fourth silver cup, for an anni\al cross country race, was promised 
by Mr. R. A. Bradshaw-Smith, Professor of Civil Engineering, on 
leaving the College when reverting to his Department in 1928. 

Session 1928-29. -The Hon'ble Raja Bahadur, Khushalpal Singh 
the United Provinces Minister for Education presided at the annual 
Convocation in July 1929. Dr. P. P. Phillips officiated as Principal 
from May 1929 until the end of the session in place of Colonel Sandes 
who was granted leave. During the year funds were provided by 
Government for the installation of electrict light in all the College 
residential quarters, a benefit which was appreciated by all concerned. 



44 HISTORY, 

The separate department of Electrical Engineering and Physics was 
abolished and the instruction in Electric Engineering transferred to the 
Mechanical and Electrical section at the Workshops. The Physics 
was combined with the work of the Chemistry Department, which 
henceforth will be known as the Department of Applied Science. 
Lt. J. S. Gurney took charge of the post of Head Master, Overseer 
Class from the beginning of the session. 



PRINCIPALS. 45 



LIST OF PRINCIPALS. 

Colonel R. Maclagan,, RE., ... ... 18471860 

Captain E. C. S. Williams, R.E., .,. ... 18601862 

Colonel J. G. Medley, R.E., ... ... 18631871 

Colonel A, M. Lang, R,E,, ... ... 18711877 

Colonel A. M. Brandreth; R.E., ... ... 18771891 

Colonel F. D. M. Brown, V.C., I.S.C., ... 18911892 

Lt.-Colonel J. CJibborn, C.I.E,, I.S.C., ... 1892 1902 

Lt.-Colonel E. H. deV. Atkinson, C f l.E., R.E., ... 19021915 

Mr. W. G. Wood, C.S.I., ... ... 19161921 

Lt.-Colonel E. W. C, Sandes, D.S.O., M.C., R.E,, 1921 In Office 



. The ranks shown are those held on vacating the appointment. 
Officiating Principals are omitted from the list, but many names appear in the 
Calendar of 1911, and the names of Mr. E. F, Tipple, Major E, W. C. Sandes, 
D.S.O., M.C., R,E., Dr. 1*. P. Phillips, and Mr, C. J. Veale should be added for 
recent years. 



46 CONVOCATION PRHSIDKHTl. 



LIST OF CONVOCATION PRESIDENTS. 

FROM 1890. 

1890. The Hon'ble Sir Auckland Oolvin, K.C.M.G., C.I.E., Lieut- 

Governor, N.-W.P. 

1891. Mr. T. H. Wickes, Chief Engineer, P.W.D., N.-W.P. 

1892. The Hon'ble Sir Auckland Colvin, K.C.M.G., C.I.E., Lieut.- 

Governor, N.-W.P. 

189$. Mr. A. H. Harington, I.G.S., Commissioner, Meerut Division. 
1894. Mr. J. G. H. Glass, C.I.E., Chief Engineer, P.W.D., N.-W.P. 

1895. ) 
to [ Principal, Thomason College, (Lt.-Col. J. Clibborn, I.S.C.), 

1897. J 

1898. Offg. Principal, Thomason College, (Lt. H. B. D. Campbell, 

R.E.). 

1899. ) 

to > Principal, Thomason College, (Lt.-Col. J. Clibborn, I.S.C,). 
1901. j 

1902. His Honor Sir J. J. D. La Touche, K.C.S.I., Lieut- 
Governor, U.P. 

1908. Principal, Thomason College, (Major E. H. deV. Atkinson, 
E.E.). 

1904. Lt.-Colonel A. E. Sandbach, R.E., 1st Sappers and Miners, 

Boorkee. 

1905. Lt.-Colonel S. V. Thorton, B.A., 0. C. Station, Roorkee. 

1906. 

4 Principal, Thomason College, (Major E. H. deV. Atkinson, 

to 
1909. 

1910. Mr, Ci E. V. Goument, Chief Engineer, P.W.D., U.P 



CONVOCATION PRK8IDINT8, 47 

1911, ) 

( Principal, Thoraason College, (Lieut.-Colonel E, H. deV. 
to f Atkinson, C.I.E., R.E.). 

1915. J 

1916. Mr. W. Qunnell Wood, C.S.I., Chief Engineer, P.W.D., U.P. 

1917. His Honor Sir James Meston, K.C.S.I., Lieut -Governor, U.P. 

1918. Mr. P. C. Rose, M.I.C.E., Secretary to Government of India, 

P.W.D. 

1919. Mr. T. R. J. Ward, C.I.E., M.V.O., 1.0. of Irrigation in 

India. 

1920. Colonel Sir S. D'A. Crookshank, K.C.M.G., C.B., C.LE,, 

D.S.O , M.V.O., Secretary to Govt. of India, P.W.D. 

1921. Mr. E. St. J. Gebbie, C.I.E,, I.G. of Irrigation in India. 

1922. H. E. Sir Harcourt Butler, K. C.S.I., C.I.E., Governor, U.P. 
1 928. H. E. Sir William Marris, K.C.S.I., K.C.I.E., Governor, U.P. 

1924. Major-General Sir E. H. deV. Atkinson, K.B.E., C.B., C.M.G., 

C.I.E., Master General of Supply. 

1925. Mr. A, C. Verrteres, C.I.E., Chief Engineer, P.W.D., U.P. 

1926. H. E. Sir Malcolm Hailey, K.C.S.I., C.I.E., Governor, 

Punjab. 

1927. Mr. B. D'O. Barley, C.I.E., Chief Engineer, Sarda Canal, 

U.P. 

1928. Mr. A. H.Mackenzie, C.I.E., Director of Public Instruction, 

United Provinces. 

1929. The Hon'ble Kaja Bahadur Kushalpal Singh, M.A., LL.B., 

Minister of Education, U.P. 



48 DISTIKOUISBED VISITORS. 

FROM 1890. 

(Of ranks included in Articles 1 to 30 only of the Warrant of 
Precedence, 1922). 

1890. The Hon'ble Sir Auckland Colvin, K.C.M.G., C.I.E., Lieut.- 

Governor, N -W.P. 
1892. The Hon'ble Sir Auckland Coivii,, K.C.M.G., C.I.E., Lieut.- 

Qovernor, K-W.P. 
1895, His Honor Sir A. P. MacDonnell, K.C.S.L, Lieut. -Governor, 

N.-w.p. 

Lieut.-General Sir W. K. Elles, K.C.B., Commanding the 
Forces in Bengal. 

1900. His Honor Sir A. P. MacDonnell, K.C.S.L, Lieut-Governor, 

N.-W.P. 

1901. The Bishop of Lucknow. 

1902. His Honor Sir J. J. D. La Touche, K.C.S.L, Lieut.-Governor, 

U.P. 

Major-General W. T. Shone, C.B.. D.S.O., D.G.M.W. 
Major-General Beresford Lovett, C.B., D.G.M.W. 
190.S. Sir A. T. Arnndel, K.C.S.L, I.C.S., Member of the Viceroy's 
Council. 

1905, H, E. Lord Curzon of Kedlastone, P.C., G.M.SJ,, G.M.I.E., 

Viceroy and Governor-General of India, (8th April). 
His Honor Sir J. J, I), La Touche, K.C.SJ., Lieut.-Gover- 
nor, U.P. 

1906. Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales (7th March). 
1918. Lord Islington, P.C., G.C.M.G., D.S.O., Chairman, Royal 

Commission on the Public Hervices in India. 

1916. His Honor Sir James Meston, K.C.S.I., Lieut.-Governor, 

U.P. 

1917. His Honor Sir James Meston, K.C.S.L, Lieut-Governor, 

U.P. 
General Sir Charles Munro, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., G.C.S.L, 

Commander-in-Chief in India. 
Lieut.-General Sir George Kirkpfttrick, K.C.B., K.C.SJ., 

Chief of Staff in India. 



DISTINGUISHED VISITORS. 49 

1918. Lieut.-General Sir H. D. Keary, K.C.B., D.S.O., G.O.C., 

Meerut Division. 

1919. Mr. T. R. J. Ward, C.I.E., M.V.O., Inspector-General of 

Irrigation in India, 

General Sir Charles Munro, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., G.C.S.I., 
Cominander-in-Chief in India. 

1 920. Lieut.-General Sir Havelock Hudson, K.C. B., C.I.E., G.O.C.- 

in-C., Eastern Command. 

1921. General Sir Claude Jacob, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., Chief of the 

General Staff in India. 

Major-General Sir Edwin Atkinson, K.B.E.. C.B., CM.G., 
C.I.E., Master General of Supply, India. 

Mr. E. St. J. Gebbie. C.I.E., Inspector-General of Irrigation, 
India. 

Mr. B. N. Sarma, Revenue and Public Works Member, 
Government of India. 

1922. H. E. Sir Harcourt Butler, K. C.S.I., C.I.E., Governor, U P, 
Field Marshall Sir William Robertson, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., 

K.C.V.O., D.S.O. 
The Hon'ble Mr. C. Y. Chintamani, Minister of Education 

and Industries, U.P. 
1928. H. E. Sir William Harris, K. C.H.I. , K.C. I.E., Governor, U.P. 

H. E. Sir Edward Maclagan, K.C.S.L, K.C.I.E., Governor, 
Punjab. 

Major-General 8ir Edwin Atkinson. K.B.E,, C.B., C.M.G., 

C.I.E., Master General of Supply, India. 
The Hon'ble Raja Parmanand, Minister of Education, U.P. 

1925. The Hon'ble Rai Rajeehwar Bali, O.B.E., Minister of Educa- 

tion, U.P. 

Major-General R. N. Harvey, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., Engi- 
neer-in-Chief, Army Head Quarters, India. 

1926. H. E. Sir Malcolm Hailey, K.C.S.L, C.I.E., Governor, 

Punjab. 
The Hon'ble Sardar Jogendra Singh, Minister of Agriculture, 

Punjab. 

1928. H. E. Baron Irwin of Kirby Underdale, G.M.S.I., G.M.I.E., 
Viceroy and Governor-General of India, (llth April). 



C?VlL ENOINEEH CLASS. J>1 

The,rules in this Circular are liable to revision without notice 

in view of possible changes in the Course of Study, 

orders of Government, etc. 

[CIRCULAR.] 



THOMASON CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 
ROORKEE. 



1929. 

These rules apply to admissions in 1930. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 



(British and Indian candidates.) 

1. Candidates for admission to this class through the entrance 
examination must be Indians as defined below.* Candidates whose 
parents or guardians are domiciled in Bengal, Madras, and Bombay 
Presidencies are, however, not eligible for admission without the 
previous sanction of the Local Government. Candidates must not 
be under 17 or above 21 years of: age on the 1st June immediately 
preceding the entrance examination of this College in which they wish 
to appear. 

Only such private students from Provinces or States outside the 
United Provinces, will be admitted to the Civil Engineer Class of the 
College who apply through the Government of the Province or State in 
which they reside for permission to appear in the admission examination 
of the College, and provided that the Government or State coaeerned 
agrees, in the event of such students gaining a place in the examination 

* A. " Native of India " means any person domiciled in British India, or within the territorial of 
Indian Princes tributary to, or in alliance with, Bis Majesty and born of parents habitually resident 
in India and not established there for temporary purposes only. " 

JTo**. To constitute residence in a particular province or state the parent or .guardian of * 
candidate for admission to the Thomaaon College, Roorkee, must have definitely settled and resitted 
there for a period of three years. 

fa jy fe" Tllis 0ircuJar is suppM on iy o n pre-paymem of anna postage, to be enclosed with 



EtJLES OF ADMISSION. 

which would otherwise entitle them to admission, to pay a contrlfeution 
towards the cost of their training, based on the actuals of the preceding 
financial year. The only exceptions to this rule will be where the United 
Provinces Government agree in special cases to waive this contribution, 
or the students themselves agree to pay it. 

The age of a candidate will be taken from the original University records 
and for candidates who have riot appeared for a University examination 
from College, or failing a College, irorn school records. No alterations 
in the records will be recognized except in the case of purely clerical 
errors. Application for examination must be accompanied by a true 
copy of University, College or school registers, as the case may be, signed 
by the Registrar, Principal or Head Master and under no circumstances 
will any alteration be accepted to the advantage of the candidate, 

All Europeans before admission to this College must be properly 
protected by inoculation against enteric fever to the satisfaction of the 
Medical Officer in charge of the College. If not protected, they must 
be inoculated on arrival at the College. 

2. No European or Anglo-Indian will be allowed to enter the 
College if married, or to continue in the College if he marries before 
completing his coarse. 

3. The College session commence on 16th October. Applications 
for admission should reach the Principal, complete in all respects, not 
later than the 15th April nor before the 1st February preceding. The 
entrance examination will be held in the first week of June. The 
application should be accompanied by a statement of 

Date of birth of the candidate. 
The school or Rchools at which he has been educated. 
The profession, Rituatiou, relationship, and residence of his father or 
guardian. 

One of the examination centres where he wishes to be examined (vide 
paragraph 9). 

N.B. No notice will be taken of applications which 
are not complete in every respect nor will any corres- 
pondence be entered into concerning them. 

4. Every candidate will be required to produce testimonials * (which 
will not be returned) of good moral conduct, under the hand of the 
instructor under whom he has been educated, or of some other superior 
under whom he may have been employed or brought up and these 



CIVIL ENGINEER OtASS. 6& 

should have reference especially to his conduct daring the 
two ye*rs immediately preceding his application for admission. 

5. A medical certificate must be furnished in the form printed after 
lule 29 ; no otbftr form will be accepted. 

6. An examination fee of Rs. 20 must be forwarded with the 
candidate's application : until this fee has been received by the Principal, 
the candidate's application will not be registered. In no circumstances 
will this fee bo refunded to the candidate. 

7. The minimum qualifying test for admission to the Entrance 
Examination, in the case of candidates from non-European institutions, 
is the Intermediate Examination of the Board of High School and 
Intermediate Education, United Provinces, or the Intermediate 
Examination of any University in British India established by law, or, in 
the case of candidates from European Schools, the Cambridge School 
Certificate with " credit " in additional Mathematics and a pass in either 
Chemistry or Physics, or the London University Matriculation Certi- 
ficate which covers the subjects required for the entrance examination, 
or such other qualifications as may be accepted by Government as 
equivalent thereto. 

8. The Entrance Examination is competitive, and those who stand 
highest on the list of passed candidates (only to the number of available 
vacancies, which is for the present fixed at 30) will be selected for 
admission to the College. The Local Government has power to relax in 
veiy special cases the rule regarding the number of admissions. Any 
candidate who, after being duly notified, fails to join tiie College on 
the day fixed for the reopening of the session, or, who, before that date, 
fails to obtain from the College authorities definite permission to join on 
some leter date, will forfeit his right to admission. 

No replies will be given to any telegrams or letters enquiring: the 
results of the entrance examination. A copy of the printed result will be 
sent to each candidate when published. 

9. The following is the list of the four subjects for the Roorkee 
Entrance Examination. They are the same for both English and 
Indian candidates. The examination will be held by means of 
gapers at the following centres only, vie, Roorkee, Allahabad, Lucknow, 
Agra, Nairn Tal, Mussoorie,* Lahore, Rangoon, Nagpur and Shillong. 

The fixing of Mussooree as a centre is conditional on seven candidates being forthcoming. 



54 RULES OF ADMTS8IOM, 

Candidates from the United Provinces will be allowed to appear 
at any centre of their choice in the United Provinces ; while 
those residing outside the United Provinces will appear at centres, if 
such exist, within their province, or failing that, at the centre nearest 
to theii; province. The papers will be sent from Roorkee about the 15th 
of May to the officers who are appointed to conduct the examination I- 
SUBJECT No. 1. LANGUAGES (250), 
(a) ENGLISH COMPOSITION (100). 

Each candidate will write a short essay on a given subject. The sub- 
ject will not be one requiring deep knowledge or thought, but the test 
will indicate whether the candidate has the power of expressing his ideas 
in good English. Quality and not quantity should be aimed at, and 
one copy book only should be used. Long quotations should be avoided, 
Quotations, if introduced, should bo brief and have a distinct bearing 
upon the subject chosen. Marks will be deducted if these instructions 
are not strictly adhered to. Marks will also be deducted for unnecessary 
or faulty repetition, bad handwritting, and errors in spelling. Careless 
work and much crossing out will be penalised as indicated in para. 8 of 
tne instructions printed on the cover of the examination book. 
(6) PBECIS WHITING (100). 

(i) Precis.* A. simple printed passage or passages will be set before 
the candidate and he will be expected to give in as few words as possible 
a definite number is usually fixed which must not be exceeded the lead- 
ing ideas expressed in the printed paragraphs. No marks will be 
allotted to any candidate who quotes, verbatim, any of the sentences 
given in the printed passages. 

(it) Paraphrasing, Each candidate will be required to explain simply 
and briefly in his own way the meaning of the examples set. The pre- 
cautions giv$n under Precis Writing apply also to paraphrasing. 

(c) HINDUSTANI (50). 

Translation of extracts, in the Persian or Hindi character, from an 
easy Hindustani book, and of easy English sentences into colloquial 
Hindustani, and grammatical questions. Full marks will not be given 
to candidates unable to write the Persian or Hindi character, but the 
Honterian system of tyaVisliteratioji may be adopted, 



CIVIL ENGINEKR CLASS, 55 

* 

SUBJECT No. 2. MATHEMATICS (400). 
(a) ARITHMETIC AND MENSURATION (80). 

(i) Arithmetic. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with all 
the general arithmetical principles and able to solve any arithmetical 
problem. Special value will be attached to the correct use of decimals 
and approximate methods in calculation. (40| t marks). 

(ti) Mensuration. General principles of measurement of lengths, 
areas, and volumes. Determination of lengths of chords and arcs of a 
circle. Areas of plane rectilineal figures, segments and sectors of a 
circle, surface of a cone, cylinder, zone of a sphere. Volumes of paral- 
lelopiped, prism, pyramid, cone, cylinder, frustum of a cone, segment of 
a sphere. Special value will be attached to abridged methods of calcula- 
tion. (60| marks). 

(b) ALGEBRA (80). 

Fundamental laws and definitions, methods of addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division. Factors, remainder theorem, and ele- 
mentary properties of integral algebraical expressions. Highest common 
factor and lowest common multiple. Elementary properties of fractions, 
simple quadratic, and simultaneous equations and elementary theory of 
equations, elementary elimination. Simple graphical solutions. Ex- 
tension of index law to fractional and negative indices. Elementary 
properties of sards and imaginary expressions. Involution and Evolu- 
tion. Elementary propositions in ratio, proportion and variation. Ele- 
mentary progressions and wydtems of numeration. Permutations and 
combinations. Elementary properties of logarithms. Proof of the 
binomial theorem for a positive integral exponent and the use of the 
binomial theorem and exponential theorem for any index, Elementary 
theory of convergent and divergent series. Elementary partial fractions. 
Graphical representation of simple functions. 

(c) GEOMETRY (80). 

Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the subject-matter of 
Euclid Books I IV, VI and XI, and to be able to give proofs of the 
propositions. Candidates will also be expected GO solve simple riders 
and to apply the propositions practically in the solutionj)! easy graphical 
problems requiring geometrical drawing. 



56 RULES OF ADMISSION. 

Book recommended, Hall and Stevens' School Geometry or any other 
hook of approximately the same standard, 

(d) TKIGONOMETBV* (80). 

Methods of measuring angles. Trigonometrical ratios and their values 
in special elementary cases. General properties of the ratios and identi- 
cal relations between them. Formula) for ratios of multiple and eub- 
multiple angles. Elementary relations between ratios and circular 
measure. Elementary properties of triangles. Use of logarithms and 
trigonometrical tables. Solution of triangles, heights, and distances. 
Elementary properties of quadrilaterals and regular polygons. Ele- 
mentary inverse notation. Solution of equations. De Moivre's theorem, 

(e) PLANE CO-ORDINATE GEOMETRY V 80). 

Elementary Co-ordinate geometry of the straight line and the circle 
(both in Cartesian and polar co-ordinates), including also the elementary 
properties of the Parabola and the Ellipse (in Cartesian co-ordinates 
only). 

SUBJECT No. 3. SCIENCE (300). 
(a) MECHANICS (100). 

Definitions of velocity, acceleration, relative velocity, angular velocity, 
etc. Measurement of such quantities when uniform or variable, and their 
graphical representation by means of curves. Motion under constant 
acceleration. Law of impact, 

Laws of motion and derivation of dynamical unit of force. Simple 
propositions and problems on work, energy, etc. Fundamental and 
derived units. Parallelogram law for the composition of velocities, 
acceleration, forces. Resultant of concurrent forces, triangle of forces, 
polygon of forces, and funicular polygon. Moments and elementary 
propositions connected therewith. Resultant of parallel forces, couples, 
and their fundamental properties, Reduction of a set of coplanar 
forces, and conditions for equilibrium. Determination of centres of 
gravity iu simple cases. Elementary machines arid application of 
principle of work. Friction and its laws. Motion of projectiles 
neglecting air rebistance. Circular motion, normal and tangential 
accelerations of a point moving along a curve. Properties of hodograph. 

* No books of any kind are allowed in the Examination balls. Logarithmic tables required will be 
supplied by tuo officer conductiug the examination, 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, 57 

Rate of description of areas under central force. Simple harmonic 
motion, and time of oscillation of a simple pendulum, Potential energy 
and conservation of energy in elementary cases. Elementary moments 
of inertia. 

(b) PHYSICS (100). 

General. Simple physical measurements; mass and weight; density 
and specific gravity of solids, liquids and gases ; barometry. 

Heat, Heat and temperature ; thermometry and calorimetry ; expan- 
sion and contraction with variations of temperature ; changes of state- 
fusion, evaporation, boiling point and vapour pressure, latent heat ; 
conduction ; convection ; radiation ; mechanical equivalent of heat. 

Sound. The production and propagation of sound ; nature of wave 
motion; amplitude, wave length, frequency; pitch ; reflection of sound ; 
resonance; determination of velocity. 

Light. Propagation ; reflection and refraction ; critical angles ; 
mirrors and lenses ; spectrum ; simple telescope, microscope, spectros 
cope, and photometers 

Magnetism* Properties of magnets ; induction ; magnetic field ; lines 
of force ; the law of magnetic force ; magnetic moments ; the Earth a 
magnet. 

Electricity. Conductors and insulators ; electrification by friction and 
induction ; influence machines ; distribution of electrical charge on con- 
ductors ; attraction; repulsion; potential; electrical capacity; primary 
cells ; properties of the electric current, i.e., chemical, magnetic and 
heating effects ; currents and resistance measurements, Ohm's law ; 
series and parallel connections ; shunts. 

No practical examination is prescribed, but all candidates are expected 
to have previously undergone an elementary course of practical work in 
a laboratory. 

(c) CHEMISTRY (100). 

General properties of matter ; simple and compound substances ; laws 
of chemical combination ; acids, bases and salts ; metals and non-metals ; 
combustion, oxidation and reduction ; atomic and molecular weights ; 
chemical equivalents ; the atomic theory ; symbols ; formulas ; simple 
chemical equations ; Avogadro's rule ; Dulong and Petit's law ; Boyle's 



$8 BULBS OF ADMISSION. 

law ; Charles' law; vapour density ; diffusion; an elementary knowledge 
of oolntion, dissociation and electrolysis. 

The preparation, general properties and principal compounds of hydro- 
gen, oxygen, nitrogen, the halogens, carbon, sulphur, phosphorus and 
mlicon, 

No practical examination is prescribed, but all candidates are ex- 
pected to have previously undergone an elementary course of practical 
work in a laboratory. 

SUBJECT No. 4. DRAWlNGf (200). 

(a) GEOMETRICAL DRAWING (100), 

The whole of practical plane Geometry including all classes of scales, 
also plain block letter printing and writing. 

(b) FKBE ARM DRAWING (100). 

('). Free Arm Drawing in pastel, of common objects in nature 
such as an orange, a mango, an apple, household utensils, 
athletic gear and ordinary carpentry or smith's tools, etc. 

(75 | o marks). 
(Book recommended, " Pastel Drawing," Isaac Pitman & Co.). 

(it;. A simple example in Memory drawing. (25 *| t marks). 
JV./? Half the full number of marks in each of -the three subjects. Languages 
(English Composition and Precis combined i Mathematics, and Drawing, and in the 
aggregate ?* required for passing No minimum of marks is prescribed for any 
of the other subjects; but the marks in no paper in which less than one quarter 
of the full number of marks has been obtained shall be allowed to count. Can* 
didates will be expected to write a clear, legible hand. Up to one^tenth of the 
marks of each paper will be deducted for slovenly work. 

10. Sixteen scholarships of Us. 50 a month are sanctioned for this 
class. Of these scholarships six will be awarded to first-year students, 
five to second-year students, and five to ^bird-year students. 

These scholarships are awarded to first-year students on the results 
of the Entrance Examination, and to second and third-year students on 
the results of the examination of the first and second year's work, and 
are tenable for the nine months of the College session. All the scholar- 
ships are reserved for candidates who have been resident in the United 
Provinces for three years at the time of their applications for the 
Entrance Examination of this class. 

f Particular attention is called to this subject in which many candidates fail to qualify. 



CIVIL ENflTNRER CLASS, 59 

11. A College tuition fee of Rs. 24 per mensem will be paid during 
the session by each student of the Class irrespective of his domicile. 
Students from Provinces or States outside the United Provinces will 
apply through the Government of the Province or State in which they 
reside for permission to appear at the College Entrance Examination 
and, provided in the event of such students training a place in the 
examination entitling them to admission, the Government or State 
concerned agrees to pay a contribution towards the cost of their training 
based on actuals of the preceding financial year. The only exceptions 
to this rule will be where the United Provinces Government agree in 
special cases to waive this contribution, or the students themselves 
agree to pay it. 

12. Each English student, unless living with friends at Roorkee, 
will be required to join the Engineer Class Mess. Indian students 
make their own arrangements for messing. 

13. Students are encouraged to take up military training by 
joining the Indian Auxiliary Force. In the case of those students 
who do not elect for military training a course of Physical Drill will he 
compulsory. 

14. It is desirable that every student should be able to swim before 
joining the College. 

15. Each student on admission is required to make a deposit in the 
College Treasury of Rs. 100, as an advance towards the purchase of the 
necessary class books for his own use. The books thus furnished to the 
student will be his own property. He should on joining the College, be 
provided with a good set of drawing instruments. 

16. Quarters are provided for all students of the Civil Engineer Class 
in hostels near the College, a student being given a room to himself for a 
rent of Rs. 5-8 per mensem. If two students of this class share a room, 
each is charged a rent of Rs. 4 per mensem ; it is desirable, however, 
that each student should have a room to himself, and separate rooms are 
provided as far as suitable accommodation is available. The hostels 
have been electrified, the charges being Rs. 2 per light and Rs. 4 per 
fan per month, Students should provide their own fans. 

17. A limited number of sets of furniture, as detailed below, are 



60 RULES OF ADMISSION, 

available for issue to students in order of seniority for which a monthly 

rental of Rs. 2-8 is charged 

European student. Indian student. 
1 Bed with mosquito poles and 

mattress >.. ... 1 1 

1 Chair ... ... 1 1 

1 Easy chair ... ... 1 1 

1 Table ... .. 1 1 large table 

1 Small table ... ... ... 1 

1 Combined chest of drawers, 

dressing table, and looking-glass 1 1 

1 Wash-hand stand ... 1 1 

1 Tub ... ... 1 1 

Students should arrange to bring their own mosquito nets, and durries. 
18., Any candidate before he can be allowed to join the College must 
satisfy the Principal that he has sufficient means to defray his expenses 
during his course at Roorkee. A. monthly allowance of Rs. 177 
should suffice for ordinary expenses of English students, and Rs. 122-12 
for Indians. 

Any student failing to keep his accounts up to date, or to make 
sufficient progress in his course of study, will be suspended or ultimately 
removed from the College. 

19. The College year usually commences on 16th October and closes 
on the 15th July. Candidates admitted to the College on the results of 
the Entrance Examination lield in June will join on the 16th October 
following. 

20. Students in the Civil Engineer class are trained for the Indian 
Service of Engineers of the Public Works Department, India, and for 
the Provincial Engineering Service of that department. They are also 
trained in the Civil Engineering profession generally, and many have 
gained employment outside India. 

2 1 . The Civil Engineering Course extends over three years. In the 
third year in June the Final Examination is held when those students 
who have completed their course of study and have qualified will receive 
certificates to that effect. 

Every candidate for apprenticeship in the Public Works Department 
mtl$t be examined by a medical board at Roorkee, after passing the final 
examination, and will be required to pay the fee required for bis examina- 
tion by that* Board. 



CIVIL ENGINEER GLASS. , 61 

A fee of Rs. 40 is payable in the third year in April by each student 
who intends to appear for this examination. If a student, having paid 
the fee, does not eventually appear for the examination, the fee will not be 
refunded, 

22. No student will be eligible for any college academic prizes unless 
lie completes his course concurrently with the students who entered the 
College in the same year, 

23. For the purpose of qualifying for possible appointments to the 
India, recruited branch of the Indian Service of Engineers in the Public 
Works Department, qualified Civil Engineer students of the Thomason 
College will be required to appear for a competitive examination to be 
held by the Government of India in October or November each year. 
Successful students will be al!5tted to the several Local Governments and 
Administrations to the number considered advisable by Government. 

Note. Detailed rules regarding the examination will be issued 
later. 

24. Recruits for the provincial engineering service will be selected 
by the Local Governments and undergo a course of practical training for 
two years. During the first year of their training they will be granted 
such subsistence and travelling allowances as may be fixed by the local 
Government concerned. The candidates selected for appointment to 
the provincial engineering service will be on probation during their 
second year of training, will be classed as Assistant Engineers will 
draw pay as such and will be reckoned against the cadre of the service. 
The allowances will be continued during the second year of training 
to candidates not selected for appointment to the service but who are 
considered by the local Government to have justified their retention 
under training for a second year. 

An officer's seniority on appointment to a provincial engineering 
service will be fixed with regard to the date on which he is appointed an 
Assistant Engineer, except that when two students of the same year 
are appointed as Assistant Engineers to the same province, their relative 
position for seniority will be regulated according to the order of standing 
at the final examination of the College, provided there has been no 
unreasonable delay on the part of the officer who took the higher place 
in joining his appointment for a course of training. 



RULES OF ADMISSION. 



25. The list of the text-books, etc., used in the Civil Engineer classes 
of the College, which are procurable at the College Book Depot, is shown 
under initial expenses. Application should be made o the Curator of the 
Book Depot, The prices quoted are charged to persons in the College 
and exclude packing charges and postage from the prices applying to 
outstation orders. 

26. Students arc prohibited from parting with their books and draw- 
ing instruments before or during their year of training. 

#7. Drawing instruments, drawing boards, T-squares, etc., are pro- 
curable at the Canal Foundry and Workshops aiui the Bazaar : every 
student must provide himself with these at his own cost. Surveying 
instruments are supplied free of cost for the use 01 students while at 
the College. 

28. Any student who is expelled from this College for misconduct 
will not be allowed to appear in any examination conducted by this 
College. 

29. Students will not be permitted to appear for any external examina- 
tions during their College course, 

30. Students will be tested in Riding before the completion of their 
College course. 

Forms required to accompany a candidate's application for admission to 
the Thomason College, Roorkce, are shown below and blank forms 
are obtainable on application on pre-paywent of anna postage. 

(1) STATEMENT HHOWING AGE, EDUCATION, ETC., OF CANDIDATE. 







Province of domicile 




Name, profession, 


Centre 




Name, 


Date 
of 
birth. 


of the father and if 
father not living of 
guardian where he 
must have definite- 
ly settled arid resid- 
ed for a period of 


Seh"ol or 
schools* at 
which 
educated. 


situation, resi- 
dence of father or 
guardian showing 
relationship of 
latter to 


selected 
in case 
of candi- 
dates of 


Remarks. 






three years. 




candidate 


U. P. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 

















I am willing to be vaccinated on admission 
(Place and date.) 



(Signature,) 



CIVIL BHGIN1ER CLASS, 6# 

(2) Educational certificate.* 

(3) Moral certificate. 

(4) Medical certificate in the form shown further. 

(5) A certificate of the recorded date of birth. 

(6) Declaration as Statutory Native of India in case of other than 
pure Indians, 

FORM OF MEDICAL CERTIFICATE, 

1 certify that I have carefully examined that 

his eyesight is of the standard prescribed ; "f that he is fairly robust, and 
his constitution is sound, and that he has no disease, or bodily or mental 
infirmity, unfitting him now, or likely to unfit him in the future, for active 
outdoor service in the Public Works Department. 

N.B. The above certificate must be signed, within a month before date of sub- 
mission, by a Commissioned Medical Officer, or by a Medical Officer in charge of a 
civil station, and must include a description giving clearly the personal marks of 
identification oi the candidate who has been medically examined. No other certi- 
ficate will be accepted, nor will applications be entertained unless the above rules be 
strictly complied with. 

fThe standard prescribed is as follows : 

1. If myopia in one or both eyes exists, a candidate may be passed, provided the 
ametropia does not exceed ;>'6D, and if, with correcting glasses not exceeding <J-5D 
the acuteness of vision in one eye equals and in the other J, there being normal 
range of accommodation with the glasses, 

2. Myopic astigmatism does not disqualify a candidate, provided the lens, or the 
combined spherical and cylindrical lenses required to correct the error of refraction, 
does not exceed 3-5D ; the acuteness of vision in one eye, when corrected, being 
equal to f , and in the other $, together with normal range of accommodation with 
the correcting glasses, there being no evidence of progressive disease in the choroid 
or retina. 

3. A candidate having total hypermetropia not exceeding 41) is not disqualified, 
provided the sight in one eye (when under the influence oi atropine) equals J and in 
the other eye equals f with 4- 4D glasses or any lower power, 

1. Hypermetropic astigmatism does not disqualify, provided the lens or combined 
lenses required to cover the error of refraction do not exceed 4D, and that the sight 
of one eye equals f and the other with or without guch lens or lenses. 



Copies properly certified by a Government gazetted officer will be accepted. 



64 RtJLS OF AtiMlSSlOK, 

5. A candidate having a defect of vision arising from nebula of the cornea ifi 
disqualified if the sight of one eye be less than j. In such a case the better eye 
must be emmetropic. Defects of vision arising from pathological or other changes 
in the deeper structures of either eye, which are not referred to in these rules, may 
exclude a candidate. 

6. A candidate is disqualified if he be unable to distinguish the principal colours 
(achromatopsia). 

7. Paralysis of one or more of the exterior muscles of the eye-ball disqualifies a 
candidate for the service. 

[Full particulars of the course of study in this class are contained in a 
pamphlet which can be obtained on application to the Curator, Book Depot."] 

Each student will be required to purchase a copy of the Standing 
Orders of this College which is on sale in the College Book Depot, at 
ten annas a copy, and ignorance of the rules therein contained will 
not be accepted as an excuse for breaking them, 

ROORKKE : | P. P. PHILLIPS, PH. D.. F.I.C , I.E.S., 
Thtldth July, 1929.) Offg, Principal Thomason College. 



CIVIL ENGiNEKR CLASS. 65 

Memorandum on Expenses of Students of the 
Civil Engineer Class, 

THE following information is published for the guidance of parents 
and guardians, and for their assistance in determining the probable ex- 
penses of a course of instruction at the College. Economical manage- 
ment is aided as far as possible by the College authorities. Books 
are provided for purchase by students on the best business terms 
obtainable at the College Book Depot. 

TV,/?. As books, etc., are not supplied by the Book Depot on credit, students can 
themselves pay cash, 

It must be clearly understood that students cannot be permitted to re- 
main in the College if their fees or bills o*' any kind are not paid prompt- 
ly on demand. The probable expenses of a student while at the College 
are shown under three heads, viz., the initial expenses at the beginning 
of each yearly term and the monthly current expenses and the final 
examination expenses. 

The current monthly expenses for English students amount to about 
Rs. 177, see details. The expenses for servants and miscellaneous are 
beyond the control of the College staff. For Indians the fixed charges 
amount to Rs. 122-12. The charges except for servants and miscel- 
laneous expenses and for mess in case of Indians must be paid before the 
2 1st of the month to which they relate and any student in arrears on the 
first of each month will lose all marks for any examination that may 
occur between this date and that on which he clears his account. 
Gruardians are advised to send the above amounts direct to the Principal, 
and, if convenient, the whole remittance intended for the student can 
thus be sent, and the balance will at once be made over to him, 



RULES OF ADMISSION. 



Initial Expenses. 

N.B. Lint and prices liable to alteration. Prices shown are those charged 
to students in College. Class books lent by the College are not entered 
in this list. 



Detail. 



Box of Drawing Instruments 

T-Square, 36* 

Set Squares, 45 and 60 

Brushes and colours 

Two drawing boards 

Workshop too) set 

One ten-inch slide rule 

Books 

IST YEAR CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, 

Mathematics. 

Gibsons Treatise on Graphs 
Fawdry and Durrell's Calculus for Beginners 
Smith's Conic Sections 
Morley's Mechanics for Engineers ... 
Jessop and Caunt's Elements of Hydrostatics 

or 

Loney's Elements of Hydrostatics ... 
Lea's Elementary Hydraulics 
Wood's Strength & Elasticity of Structural Members 
Andrew's Theory and Design of Structures 
Dynamics London C. U. P. 

Civil Engineering. 
Moles worth's Pocket-Book 
Roorkee Manual of Building Materials 

Ditto ot Earthwork 

Ditto of Carpentry 

Ditto of Masonry 

Surveying and Drawing. 
Roorkee Manual of Surveying, Part I 

Ditto of Drawing, do. I 

Ditto ditto do, II 

Applied Ssience. 

Taylor's Student's Chemistry 
Jones' Junior Course of Practical Chemistry 
The Tutorial Physics, Vol. II, Heat 
Ditto Vol. III. Light 



Price. 



Rs. A. p. 



480 
4 13 



520 
9 14 
800 
600 



4 
8 

10 
14 

11 

7 

8 
6 



380 
240 
620 
460 



Remarks. 



Not avail- 
able at Col- 
lege Book 
Depot. May 
be arranged 
elsewhere. 

J 

Approx. 
Approx. 



} Approx, 
> Approx, 



CIVIL ENGINEEll GLASS. 

List of prices, 0fo. (concluded). 



67 



Detail. 


Price. 


Remarks. 


2*D YEAR CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 


Rs. A. p. 




Mathematics 






Fawdry and DarrelPs Calculus for Engineers 


480 


Approx. 


Lamb's Infinitesimal Calculus 


13 10 




Wood's Theory of Structures 


... 




Andrew's Further Problems in the Theory of Struc- 


580 




tures. 






Civil Engineering. 






Roorkee Manual of Irrigation Works, Vols. I. ... 


3 14 




Ditto ditto do. do. II. ... 


250 




Ditto of Railways 


510 




Ditto of Estimating 


4 10 




Ditto of Roads 


1 15 




Ditto of Building Construction 


1 1 




Ditto of Bridges with Steel Bridges ... 


300 




Surveying, Part II 


330 




Abney's Instruction in Photography ... 


... 




Applied Science. 




' 


Hatch's Mineralogy ^ ... 
Geikie's Geology * ... 


5 7 [ Appr X * 


Electrical Engineering. 




Davidge and Hutehinson's Technical Electricity ... 




Meare's Electrical Engineering (Practical) 


15 




BRD YEAR CLASS. 






Concrete Plain & Reinforced by Taylor & Thompson 
Reinforced Concrete Design, Faber and Bowie 


25 
27 


i Approx. 


Roorkee Manual of Sanitary Engineering, Part I 


... 




(Water-supply). 


390 




Roorkee Manual of Sanitary Engineering, Part II 






(Sewerage and Drainage Works). 


2 13 




TnghY Book-keeping 


2 8 


Approx. 


GENERAL. 






Standing Orders 


10 




Surveying and Level Field Books and Note-books 


8110 




Entrance donation to Mess for the first and second 


10 


English stu- 


year, each year/ 




dents only. 


Yearly donation to Sports and Regatta Fund 


300 


AH students. 


Entrance donation to Recreation Club for the first 


10 


Ditto. 


and second year, each year. 






Yearly donation to Indian Engineer Class Club ... 


500 


Indian stu- 
dents only. 


Photography Voluntary subject 


50 


Voluntary. 



BULBS OF ADMISSION. 



Current Monthly Expenses for nine months only. 

fa) European students. 



If! 



Rs. 15 



(College fee 
Bent and Conservancy 
Bent of College furniture 
Recreation Fund 
Mess subscription 
Billiards 
Babu, for accounts 
Messing, three meals 
Mess contingencies 



Bearer 

Bhisti 

Dhobi 

Sweeper ... 

Liquors and mineral waters 



Electric light 
Miscellaneous extra expenses 

Total 

CO /' 

j College fee 

, I Bent and conservancy 
Rent of College furniture 
' Recreation Fund 

Indian Engineer Class Club 

Messing 



Servant 

Dhobi ... 

Sweeper 

Electric light 

Miscellaneous extra expenses 

Total 



5 



Bs. A. P. 

24 
12 
8 

8 
8 

8 
8 



10 

11 

2 

1 

46 

7 



16 
I 12 
400 
200 

10 



2 05 
30 



177 



Variable. Re. 1-8 per diem. 
Oil and Petrol lighting, fruit, 
etc. 

Part wages, as students em- 
ploy these servants in com- 
mon. 

Variable. Some students 
spend less than Rs. 10 but 
Rs. 10 is not extravagant. 
Per point per month. 
Added to cover miscellaneous 
extra expenditure. 



i student*. 

Rs. A. P. 

24 
5 12 

280 
10 





3 
35 



7 
2 
1 
2 
30 







8 







122 12 



Cost is somewhat higher us- 
ually for Mohamedans and 
Sikhs. 

i Part wages, as students em- 

>ploy these servants in com- 

) mon. 

Per point per month. 

Added to cover miscellaneous 
extra expenditure. 



NOTE. A charge of Rs. 4/- per month is made for current for each electric fan 
in use during the hot weather. 

(c) Additional non-recurring expenses for both European and 
Indian students. 

(i) Fee charged to each Brd-year Rs. A. P. 

student in April for appearing 

for the Final Examination 40 

(it) Initial cost of instruments of 

books, vi.de list given. 



Variable according to those 
purchased. 



ROORKEE : 
The 16th July, 1929. 



P. P. PHILLIPS, PH, D M F.I.C., I.E.S., 

Principal, Thomason College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS CIRCULAR. 69 



THOMASON CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 
ROORKEE, 



Supplement to the Civil Engineer Class Circular, 

1929. 



The following explanatory notes are printed as a supplement to the 
Civil Engineering Class Circular to enable teachers and candidates to 
understand what is meant and required under the new course in 
Drawing. 

(a>. Geometrical Drawing* The standard will be slightly higher 
than that of the Higher School Examination of the Board of High 
School and Intermediate Education, United Provinces. Candidates 
will be asked to answer in pencil, not in ink, about six questions on a 
quarter shett of cartridge paper, size 13" x 10". 

(b). Free- Arm Drawing. Drawing on toned paper objects direct 
from nature in pasties or colonrs (white also may be a medium) ; the 
objects should usually be life size. The standard will be that of the 
High School Examination of the Board of High School and Inter* 
mediate Education, United Provinces. The following are examples of 
objects : 

Gloy bottles, cigarette tins, match boxes, hair brushes, parcels tied 
with string, books, ink bottles. 

Drawing should not be outlined with a pencil or charcoal, but witb a 
medium of the correct colour. 

Memory Drawing.* One of the best exercises is to take a drawing 
away from a student, remove the object and then ask him to give a 
quick hand-sketch of the object he has just drawn, the idea being to 
train the faculties of observation and the perception of things in general. 
Or ask a clnss, one by one, to draw on the board a nib, a brash, key or 

* 8?e Prospectus Arts, Science, Commerce and Agricultural examinations of the Board of High 
School and Intermediate Education, United Provinces. 



70 SUPPLEMENT TO THE CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS CIRCULAR. 

any other common everyday object with which he is familiar noting 
proportions, and as an examination to name as many fixed objects as he 
knows exist in the gymnasium, playing-field, dining ball or in the school 
room even to the number of steps, doors, windows, desks, etc. It will be 
found that the drawing of small objects will come naturally when once 
the powers of observation have been aroused. 

Short exercises in Memory drawing will improve Free-arm drawing 
And the alertness and keenness of the scholar in general ; they will 
also inculcate a sense of proportion which is wanting in the average 
student. 

Materials* A set of pastels of 8 to 10 colours costing about eight 
annas, paper of toned variety, to suit the subject, known as "Pastleloid" 
which is of the quality of brown packing-paper costing about 2 annas 
A large sheet. Brown packing-paper is a very good substitute if it is 
not glazed. Light greys and browns are the most popular tints. 



OVKRBEER CLASS. VI 

The rules in this Circular are liable to revision without notice 

in view of possible changes in the Course of Study, 

orders of Government, etc. 

[CIRCULAR.] 

THOMASON CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 
ROQRKEE. 

1929. 

These rules apply to admissions in 1930. 

OVERSEER CLASS. 

1. Under the recent orders of Government there is in future to be 
only one Subordinate Engineering Service in the Public Works de- 
partment in place of an Upper Subordinate Service and a Lower 
Subordinate Service. A new class entitled u The Overseer Class " 
has now been constituted at the College to meet the requirements of the 
new service, and of the public demands for a class of men trained to a 
standard intermediate between the two old classes. 

Note. The new Subordinate Engineering Service will, at first, receive recruits 
trained at the Thomason College, Roorkee, but the class may be transferred to 
another station in the near future. 

2. Candidates for admission to this class must not be under 16 or 
above 21 years of age on the 1st June immediately preceding the 
entrance examination of this College in which they wish to appear. 

The age of a candidate will be taken from the original University 
records, and for candidates who have not appeared for a University 
examination, from College, or, failing a College, from school records. 
No alterations in the records will be recognized except in the case of 
purely clerical errors, Application for the examination must be ac- 
companied by a true copy of University, College or school registers, as 
the case may be, signed by the Registrar, Principal or Head Master, and 
under no circumstances will any alteration be accepted to the advantage 
of the candidate. 

3. The class is intended primarily for Europeans, Anglo-Indians 
and Indians resident within the United Provinces. Candidates from other 
provinces of India or Burma will only be admitted when vacancies in 
the class remain after the claims of all candidates resident in the United 
Provinces have been considered. 

Note. To constitute residence in a particular province or state the parent or guardian of a 
candidate for admission to this College must have definitely settled and resided there for a period 
of three years* 

Jbte This circuJajf is supplied only on pre-payment of i anna postage, to be enclosed with 
oh application. 



72 ROLES OP ADMISSION. 

4, Applications for admission should reach the Principal, complete 
in all respects, not later than the 1st May preceding the entrance 
examination, accompanied by a statement of 
The date of birth of the candidate. 
The school or schools at which he has been educated, 
The profession, situation, relationship and residence of his 

father or guardian. 
One of the three examination centres he wishes to be examined 

at vide paragraph 10). 

/v.#. -No notice will be taken of applications which are not 
complete in every respect, nor will any correspondence be en- 
tered into concerning them. 

5. Every candidate will be required to produce testimonials (copies 
properly certified by a Government gazetted officer will be accepted), 
which will not be returned, of good moral conduct, under the hand of the 
instructor under whom he has been educated, or of some other superior 
under whom he may have been employed or brought up ; and these 
testimonials should have reference especially to his conduct during the 
two years immediately preceding his application for admission. 

6. The qualifying tests for admission to the entrance examination 
will be the High School examination conducted by the Board of Educa- 
tion, United Provinces, or the School Leaving Certificate examination 
of this province or the Matriculation examination of the Allahabad 
University (or equivalent examination of other provinces at present 
recognized by the Allahabad University lor purposes of Matriculation). 
In the case of European candidates, the Senior Cambridge examination or 
the High School Final examination under the Code of Regulations for 
European schools in force in Bengal, Bombay and Madras Presidencies, 
the United Provinces, Punjab or Central Provinces will also be recognized, 

7. In case of pupils of Government schools who have passed 
as *' Teachers' " certificates must be furnished that three years hare 
elapsed since they left the Normal School, or they must furnish 
an order from the Inspector of Schools of their district authorizing 
their application to enter this College. 

8. A "registration" fee of Rs. 10 must accompany the candidate's 
application for examination. In no circumstances will this fee be refund- 
ed to the candidate. 

9. A medical certificate must be furnished in the form printed after 
paragraph 31 ; no other will be accepted, 



OVEK8KER CLASS. 73 

10. The candidate must be acquainted with both the English 
language and the vernacular of Upper India, and able to speak, read 
and write them with tolerable ease and accuracy. He must pass an 
entrance examination in the following subjects, which will be held 
in the first week in June, at the following centres, viz., Roorkee, 
Agra, Lucknow, Allahabad and at any other centres, at the discretion 
of the Principal. Candidates from the United Provinces will be allowed 
to appear at any centre of their choice in the United Provinces ; 
while those residing outside the United Provinces will appear at centres, 
if such exist, within their province, or failing that, at the centre nearest 
to their province. Examination papers will be sent from Roorkee 
about the 15th of May to the officers appointed to conduct the exami- 
nation : 

Full marks 
English Composition (Essay ; .. .. .. ., 50 

* English Dictation (neatness, correct spelling, punctuation and writing 

will be taken into account) . , . . . . 50 

Arithmetic. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with all the 
general arithmetical principles, and able to solve arithmetical 
problems .. .. .. 100 

Algebra. Fundamental laws and definitions. The methods of 
addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, Ii. 0. F., 
L. C. M , factors, fractions, simple and elementary simultaneous 
equations .. .. .. .. . 100 

Geometry. Euclid, Books I and II, and simple riders .. .. 100 

Drawing, Printing, scales and simple geometrical figures (as in the 
Thompson College, Roorkee, Drawing Manual, Fart I, Chapters 
I IV) .. ,. .. . ... 100 

Hindustani. Translation of extra t in Hindi or Persian characters, 
from any easy Hindustani book *ai of easy English sentences into 
colloquial Hindustani, and grammatical questions .. .. 100 

/ Total of Marks . . 600 

N, If, One-third of the marks in each subject and one-half of the total marks 
are required for passing. 

11. Any candidate who, after being duly notified, fails to join 
the College on the day fixed for the re-opening of the session, or, 
who before that date fails to obtain from the College authorities 
definite permission to join on some later date, will forfeit his right to 
admission. 

12, No degree, certificate, etc,, obtained by him at any other institu- 



74 HUL1S OF ADMISSION. 

tion will entitle ft candidate to enter this College, nor will it exempt 
him, in whole or in part, from the entrance examination above detailed. 

18. Each examination is complete in itself, and no credit for 
marks gained in one examination is carried on to any other exam- 
ination. A candidate who has failed in, or withdrawn from, an exam- 
ination after his name has been registered, and presents himself for 
examination on a subsequent occasion, must undergo the full examination 
and furnish a frfeh fee and certificates. 

No replies will be given to any telegrams or letter enquiring the 
results of the entrance examination. A copy of the printed result will 
be sent to each candidate when published. ' 

14. In this class a College fee of Rs. 6 a month during the session 
will be charged to students admitted through the entrance examination. 
All students of this class will be provided with quarters in the College 
hostels at a monthly rent of Re. 1 ; but no member of a student's family 
is allowed to reside in them with him. 

The hostels have been electrified, the charges being Rs. 2 per light and 
Us. 4 per fan, per month. Students should provide their own fans. 

15. For this class there will for the present be 40 vacancies every year 

16. There will be 8 scholarships of the value of Rs. 25 per mensem, 
each tenable for the nine months of the College session, awarded annually 
on the results of the entrance examination and on the first year's Final 
examination. 

17. Each student will make his own arrangements for the purchase 
of the necessary class books and instruments. The probable expense 
of these may amount to about Rs. 200 (vide details on page 9) during 
their course of study, and no one should present himself for admission 
who is not prepared to meet the above charges, as well as those of 
feeding himself, and dressing in decent and clean apparel. 

18. The course for each student wilj he two years at the College 
devoted to a theoretical training, 

If at any period of the course their conduct is unsatisfactory, or if 
they fail to make sufficient progress in their studies, they will be sus- 
pended or removed from the College. 

19. Those who are selected for training by the Senior Chief 
Engineer as probationers for the United Provinces Subordinate 
Engineering Service will undergo a further year's practical training 
on works, and will be entitled " Apprentice Overseers." 



OVERSEER CLASS. 75 

20. The College session commences on the 16th October and 
ends on the 15th July following. At the end of the first session 
long and searching examinations will be, held, and no student who 
fails in the standard prescribed for the first year course will be 
allowed to continue his studies at the College. At the close of the 
second sessiun the Final examinations will be held. 

21. The College vacation will be from the 16th July to the idth 
October. Students will not be allowed to stay in the College hostels 
during the vacation, but must go homejo their relatives or friends. 

22. There will be two classes of certificates awarded on the results of 
the Final examination : 

I. The Higher Certificate, awarded to students obtaining at least 50 

per cent, in each group and 60 per cent, on the total marks. 
II. The Ordinary Certificate, awarded to students obtaining at least 
33 per cent, in each group and 50 per cent, on the total marks. 

23. The selected Apprentice Overseers will spend the third year 
of their training in acquiring the practical part of their education. 
They will be sent out to large and important works and placed under 
the charge of an experienced instructor. 

During the third or apprentice year they will retain their position 
as students and will continue to be borne on the College lists. They 
will receive a salary of Rs. 40 per mensem. 

24. The apprentices will keep notes of the works they are instructed 
on, which they will submit monthly with a diary of occupation, through 
the instructor and Executive Engineer, to the Principal at Roorkee, 
These officers will note on the diary their opinions regarding the appren- 
tice's application to work and conduct, and the appointment of each 
apprentice to the Public Works Department will depend on his steadi- 
ness, temper, intelligence, industry and practical knowledge of the 
descriptions of work in which he has been instructed. The Senior 
Chief Engineer will finally decide which apprentices are fitted for perman- 
ent appointment to the Public Works Department. 

25. On the conclusion of one year's training on the works the 
approved apprentices will be appointed on probation for one year and 
thereafter, if their work has been considered satisfactory, be permanently 
appointed to the Subordinate Engineering Service of the Public Works 
Department, United Provinces. The pay of this service has been fixed 
at Rs. 80 7227 per mensem with two efficiency bars when the stages 
of Rs. 129 and 178 are reached. Overseers on probation will draw 
Rfl. 80 per mensem and the first increment will be granted on confirmation. 



RULES OF ADMISSION. 



86. Travelling allowance at the sanctioned rates will be paid to 
apprentices For the distance from Roorkee to the site of the works on 
which they are to serve, and attain from this site to the stations where 
they are to be employed permanently as subordinates. 

27. The list of the text-books, etc., used in this class, and which 
is procurable at the College Book Depot, is shown under initial expenses. 
Application should be made to the Curator. 

28. Drawing instruments, drawing boards, T-squares, etc,, are pro- 
curable at the Canal Foundry and Workshops and the bazaar. Every 
student must provide himself with these at his own cost. Surveying 
instruments are supplied free of cost for tho use of students while at the 
College. 

29. Any student who is expelled from this College for misconduct will 
not be allowed to appear in any examination conducted by this College. 

80. It is desirable that every student should be able to swim before 
joining the College, 

81. Students wiil not be permitted to appear for any external 
examinations during their College course. 

82. . Students will be tested in Riding before the completion of their 
College course. 

Forms feqwred to accompany a candidate's application for admission 
to the Thompson College, Roorkee, are obtainable on application on 
pre-payment of \ anna postage. 

( 1) Statement showing a^e, education, etc., of candidate : 





Province of domicile 








VT Date of 
Name. Wrfch 


of the father and if 
lather not living, of 
guardian where he 
must have definitely 
settled and resided for 


School or 
'schools at 
winch edu- 
cated. 


Name, profession 
residence of father 
or guardian 
showing 
relationship. 


Remarks. 


! 


a period of three 1 years. 








i 
i 


3 


4 


5 


6 



I am willing to be vaccinated and (in the case of European students) inoculated on admission. 
(Place and date ) (Signature). 

(2) Educational certificate.* 

(3) Moral certificate. 

(4) Medical certificate. 

(b) A certificate of the recorded date of birth, 
FORM OF MEDICAL CERTIFICATE. 
2 certify that T hav* carefully examined _ _,- that 



hi* eyesight is of the standard prescribed ;f that he is fairly 



, and hit 



* Copies verified by a Government gazetted officer will IK accepted. 



OVEH8BKR CLABB. 7X 

constitution is sound; that he has no disease^ or bodily or mental infirmity , 
unfitting him now, or likely to unfit him in the future, for active outdoor service 
in the Public Works Department. 

JN.B. The above certificate must be signed within a month beforedate of sub- 
mission by a Commissioned Medical Officer or by a Medical Officer in charge of a 
civil station, and must include a description giving clearly the personal marks of 
identification of the candidate who has been medically examined. No other certifi- 
ate will be accepted, nor will applications be entertained unless the above rules be 
strictly complied with. 

The standard prescribed is as follows : 

1. If myopia in one or both eyes exists, a candidate may be passed, provided 
the ametropi a does not exceed 3-51), and if, with correcting glasses not exceeding 
3'5D, the acuteness of vision in one eye equals and in the other , there being 
normal range of accommodation with the glasses. 

2. Myopic astigmatism does not disqualify a candidate, provided the lens or 
the combined spherical and cylindrical lenses required to correct the error of refrac- 
tion, does not exceed 3'5D; the acuteness of vision in one eye, when corrected, being 
equal to f and in the other J. together with normal range of accommodation with 
the correcting glasses, there being no evidence of progressive disease in the choroid 
or retina. 

3. A candidate having total hypermetropia not exceeding 4D in not disqualified 
provided the sight in one eye (when under the influence of atropine) equals J and 
in the other eye equals |, with 4- 4D glasses or any lower power. 

4. Hypermetropic astigmatism does not disqualify, provided the lens or com- 
bined lenses required to cover the error of refraction do not exceed il) t and that the 
sight of one eye equals | and the other g, with or without uch lens or lenses 

5. A candidate having a defect of vision arising from nebula of the cornea is 
disqualified if the sight of one eye be less than -/ ? . In such a case the better eye 
must be emmetropic. Defects of vision arising from pathological or other changes 
in the deeper structures of either eye, which are not referred to in these rules, may 
exclude a candidate 

6. A candidate is disqualified if he be unable to distinguish the principal colours 
(achromatopsia)* 

7. Paralysis of one or more of the exterior muscles of the eyeball disqualifies a 
candidate for the service- t 

[Full particulars of the course of study and syllabus of this class are contained 
in a pamphlet, which can be obtained on application to the Curator, Boo Depot 
at eleven annas a copy.] 



Each student will be required to purchase a copy of the Standing 
Orders of the College, which is on sale in the College Book Depot, at 
twelve annas a copy, and ignorance of the rules therein contained will not 
be accepted as an excuse for breaking them. 

ROORKBE : I P. P. PH! LLIPS, Ph. D,, F.LC., I.B.B., 



,i 



The 15th July, 1929.} 0/g. Principal, Thomason College. 



7$ RULES OF ADMISSION. 

Memorandum on the expenses of students of the 
Overseer Class* 



The following information is published for the guidance of parents 
and guardians, and for their assistance in determining the probable 
expenses of a course of instruction at the College. 

Economical management is aided as far as possible by the 
College authorities. Books are provided for purchase by students, 
on the best business terms obtainable at the College Book Depot. 

N.B.As books, etc., are not supplied by the Book Depot on credit, students 
can themselves pay cash. 

It must be clearly understood that students cannot be permitted 
to remain in the College if their fees or bills of any kind are not 
paid promptly on demand. 

The probable expenses of a student while at the College are shown 
under two heads, viz., (i) the initial expenses of each yearly 
term, and (ii) the monthly current expenses. 

With regard to current expenses, the regular monthly charges 
amount to about Ks. 10 (see details). The charges for messing, 
personal servants, and any other expenses the student may incur 
are beyond the control of the College staff. 

The above-mentioned regular charges of about Rs. 10 must be 
paid before the 21st of the month to which they relate, and any 
student in arrears on the first of each month will lose all marks 
for any examination that may occur between this date and that on 
which he clears his account. 



OVKRSEBR CLASS, 



79 



(i) Initial expenses. 

. . last and prices are liable to alteration. The prices shown are those charged 
to gtudentB in College. Class books lent by the College are not entered in this Hat: 



Detail. 


Price. 


Remarks. 


Box of drawing instruments 


HS. A, P. 


Not available ut 


T-Square, 36* 
Set Squares. 4 5 and 
Brushes and colours 
Drawing boards 




College Book 
Depot. May be 
arranged else- 
where. 


Workshop tools .. 






FIBST Y $&!&.. Mathematics. 






Kirkman and Field's Arithmetic for Schools 
Hall and Knight's Elementary Algebra 


480 
440 


| Approx. 


Hamblin Smith's Elementary Trigonometry 


.. 




Pierpoint's Elementary Mensuration j ar jj 


1 14 

240 


Approx. 


Hall and Stevens' Geometry Part I to V 


360 


Approx. 


Roorkee Mathematical Tables 


1 8 




Loney's Mechanics 


.. 




Civil Engineering. 






Molesworth's Pocket Book 


4 4 




Roorkee Manual of Materials 


1 8 




Ditto Earthwork 


1 10 




Ditto Masonry 


1 11 




Ditto Building Construction 


1 1 




Ditto Carpentry 


1 14 




Mitchell's 40 Lemons in Carpentry Workshop Practice 






Surveying and Drawing. 






Hoorkee Manual of Surveying, Part I 


370 




Ditto Drawing, Part i 


280 




Ditto do do II 


260 




Natural Science. 






Gregory's Clas* Book of Physics, Parts III and IV 


2 C 




SECOND YEAR. Mathematics. 






Building Mechanics, Sheppard 


8 4 


Approx. 


Roorkee Manual of Hydraulic 


1 ) 




Civil Engineering. 






Hoorkee Manual of Roads 


1 15 




Ditto Estimating 
Ditto Bridges with Steel Bridges . . 


4 10 
300 




Ditto Irrigation Works, Voln. I . . 


3 14 




Ditto do do do II 


250 




Ditto Railways 


5 1 




Sanitary Engineering. 






Hoorkee Manual, Part I, Water-supply 


3 




Ditto do II, Sewerage and Drainage 






Works 


2 13 




Mitchell and Davey's 40 Lessons in Engineering 






Workshop Practice 


.. 




GENERAL. 






Abney's Instruction in Photography .. 


8 


For optional lubjoct. 


Standing Orders 


10 


Half price usually re- 


Furniture .. 


10 


coverable on oomple- 


Photography Voluntary subject 


60 


iion of College course 
Voluntary. 



80 



BULBS OF ADMIISION. 



(ii) Current monthly expenses for nine months only. 
Indian students. * 



Fixed 
charges. 



College fee 
House-rent 
Recreation Club 



Newspaper 
Messing 

ServantsCook Rs. 1/8, servant Rs. 1(8 
Dhobi 
Barber 

Electric energy 
Miscellaneous, about 

Total 



Rs. A. P. 

600 
1 
200 
12 
15 00 Variable. 

300 Part wages, as stu- 
dents employ ser- 
180 vants in common, 

080 

6 KB. 2/- in Winter & . 
9 4 4/- in Summer. 



45 



The above is for Indian students. For Europeans the monthly ex- 
penses would probably amount to Rs. 70. 



ROOBKEE : 
Th* UthJuly, 1929. 



P. T. PHILLIPS, PH. D., F.I.C., I.H.B., 

g., Principal, Thomawn College. 



DRAFTSMAN CLASS. 81 

The rules In this Circular are liable to revision without notice 

in view of possible changes in the Course of Study, 

orders of Government, etc. 

[CIRCULAR.] 



THOMASON CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, 
ROORKEE. 



1929. 

These rules apply to admissions in 1930. 



DRAFTSMAN CLASS 

1. For admission to the Draftsman class an entrance examination 
will be held annually at the Thomason College as soon after the 16th 
October as possible ; due notice of the dates on which the examination 
will be held will be given to all candidates. The subjects for the 
examination will be (1) Arithmetic, (2) English, (3) the preparation of 
simple Drawing scales and Italic printing, (4) Geometry and very 
simple Mensuration. The standard in these subjects, (except Drawing) 
will be that of the School Promotion Examination, Class VIII. The 
first ten on the list of passed candidates will be selected annually for 
admission to the Draftsman Class. No entrance fee will he charged for 
this examination, Indians of pure Asiatic descent who have not been 
resident for at least three years in the United Provinces are not 
eligible for admission to this class. 

2. The minimum qualifying test for permission to appear for the 
Entrance Examination will be the School Promotion Examination in 
Class VIII. of an Anglo -Vernacular School. Candidates must submit 
a certificate signed by the Head Master of the school in which they 
have been educated, showing that they possess the minimum educa- 
tional qualifications and are of good character, industrious and have 
an aptitude for Drawing, 

Jfato This Circular is supplied only ou pre- payment of | anna postage, to be enclosed with each 
application. 



82 BULBS OF ADMISSION. 

In the case of candidates who cannot furnish the certificate signed by 
a Head Master, owing to their not being in a school, a certificate of good 
moral character and industrial aptitude will he accepted, if signed by any 
Government gazetted officer, and their educational fitness for the class 
will be tested on their presenting themselves at the College. 

3. All candidates must furnish a certificate of sound health and 
physical fitness in the form given below. No other form will be 
accepted : 

FORM OF MEDICAL CERTIFICATE, 



1 certify that I have carefully examined. 



that his eyesight is of the standard prescribed,* that he is fairly 
robust, and his constitution is sound, and that he has no disease, or bodily 
or mental infirmity unfitting him now, or likely to unfit him in the 
future, for active outdoor service in the Public Works Department. 

N.B. The above certificate must be signed, within a mouth before date of submission, by a 
Commissioned Medical Officer, or by a Medical Officer in charge of a civil station, and must include a 
description, giving clearly the personal marks of identification of the candidate who has beep medically 
examined. No other certificate will be accepted. 

The standard prescribed is as follows : 

1. If myopia in one or both eyea exists, a candidate may be passed, provided the ametropia does 
not exceed 3'5D, and if, with correcting glasses not exceeding 3'6D the acuteness of vision in one eye 
equals f and in the other , there being normal range of accommodation with the glasses. 

2. Myopic astigmatism does not disqualify a candidate, provided the lens or combined spherical 
and cylindrical lenses, required to correct the error of refraction, does not exceed 3*5D ; the acuteness 
of vision In one eye, when corrected, being equal to g and in the other , together with normal range of 
accommodation with the correcting glasses there being no evidence of progressive disease in the choroid 
or retina. 

3. A candidate having total hypermetropia not exceeding 4D is not disqualified, provided the 
ignt in one eye when under the influence of atropiue equals f and in the other eye equals f , with Hh 4I> 

glasses or any lower power, 

4. Hypermetropic astigmatism does not disqualify provided the lens or combined lenses required to 
cover the error of refraction do not exceed 4D and that the sight of one eye equals f and the other | 
with or without such lens or lenses. 

x 6. A candidate having a defect of vision arising from nebula of the cornea is disqualified if the 
sight of one eye be less than T V In such a case the better eye must be emmetropic. Defects of vision 
arising from pathological or other changes in the deeper structures of either eye, which are not referred 
to in these rules, may exclude a candidate. 

6. A candidate is disqualified if he be unable to distinguish the principal colours (achromatopsia), 

7. Paralysis of one or more of the exterior muscles of the eye-ball disqualifies a candidate far the 



DRAFTSMAN CMAfl. 83 

4. Applications for admission should be submitted to the Principal 
during the, month of September. None will be entertained which are 
received after the 80th September. Every application must be accom- 
panied by tfae following statement and certificate : 

Forms required to accompany a candidate's application for admission 
are obtainable on application on prepayment of anna postage 
from the Thomason College, Roorkee. 
(1) Statement showing age, education, etc., of candidate : 





. Province of 














domicile of the 












Name. 


father, and if 
father not living 
of guardian where 
he must have 
definitely settled 
and resided for a 


Date 
of 
birth 


School or 
schools 
at which 
educated, 


Name, caste, 
profession and 
residence of 
father or 
guardian. 


Duration of 
previous 
training 
in school. 


Signature 
of 

candidate 




period of three 














years. 










1 


2 


a 4 


5 


6 


7 



I am willing to be vaccinated on admission. 

(Signature of candidate'). 

(Place and date). Signature of Head Master of School. 

PAPERS, ETC., SUPPLIED HEREWITH. 

(2) Certificate of character and education, etc., (vide paragraph 2). 

(8) Birth certificate or affidavit. 

(4) Medical certificate (vide paragraph 8).* 

5. Full discretion rests with the Principal to remove any student 
who appears to be unlikely to profit by the training. A removal under 
this rule will imply no reflection on the student's character. 

6. The College session commences on the 16th October of each 
year. Accepted candidates should present themselves for the entrance 
examination on the date which will be notified to them : all are required 
to be present on that date, otherwise they will forfeit the right of 
admission. Their admission will depend on the results of the exami- 
nation and they should join the class immediately after the results are 
notified. 



* If desired, this certificate need not be forwarded by candidates until required of 
by the PriacipaJ, bat no student can join these classes without one. 



84: EULE8 OF ADMI98IOH. 

7. Candidates will pay no fees and will be provided with free 
quarters, if available, bat no member of a candidate's family will be 
allowed to reside in tbem with him. 

8. No stipends will be given, but not more than twelve scholarships 
of Rs. 4 per mensem are available to be given at the discretion of the 
Principal to such candidates as show marked application and ability, and 
as have been resident in the United Provinces for three years at the time 
of their admission to this class. No apprentice can receive a scholarship 
till he has been in the College for three months, or may hold a scholar- 
ship for more than a year. No scholarship will be payable while an 
apprentice is on leave or vacation. 

9. Tools and materials will be supplied free for the use of candidates, 
but remain the property oi' the College, and all work turned out during 
working hours will be the property of the College. 

10. On completion of the course of training, students will be granted 
a certificate as "Draftsman" with ''qualified in Simple Estimating" in the 
ease of those students only who attain the requisite standard in the 
subject* The course of training for the Draftsman Class will extend 
over three years, but any candidate who gains admission, and, in the 
opinion of the Principal, is initially a good draftsman, may be allowed 
to join the class in the second year. The College does not undertake to 
find employment for any man, though it will give all the assistance it 
can. Certificate holders are expected to find employment for themselves 
in the open market. Any apprentice leaving before he is, in the opin- 
on of the Principal, a skilled and competent workman, will, on no 
consideration, be given a certificate. 

11. Any student who is expelled from this College for misconduct 
will not be allowed to appear in any examination conducted by this 
College. 

Each student will be required to purchase a copy of the Standing Orders 
of this College, which is on sale in the College Book Depot, at ten annas 
a copy, and ignorance of the rules therein contained will not be accepted 
as an excuse for breaking them. 



ROORKEE: j P. P. PHILiLIPS, PH. i>., F.I.C., I.B.S., ^ 
The Ibth July, 1929.) Offg. Principal, Thomason College. 




CO 

fe 
o 

B 
cc 

M 



o 
w 



o 
fc 



tf 
O 

H 





g 

2 

w 

H 
fc 

3 
^ 
w 

^ 
^ 

o 

H 

05 
H 



^ 

W 

^ 

w 



CIVIL BNGINKEE CLASS, 85 

COURSE OF STUDY AND SYLLABUS. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, 1929-30. 

THE chief points kept in view in arranging this course of study are, to 
ensure the necessity for steady work throughout the whole course, and to 
co-ordinate the instruction given in each suhject so as to lead up to a 
thorough test of the qualifications necessary for a Civil Engineer of as 
high a grade as a College training can produce, special attention being 
paid to the local conditions of India. This test is represented by the 
Project and the Final Examinations. 

Four-tenths of the total marks at the end of the 1st year are carried 
forward in each group to the 2nd year. Similarly, seven-tenths of the 
total marks at the end of the 2nd year are carried forward to the 3rd 
year. Continuous steady work is necessary to ensure qualification at the 
end of each year. 

Terms and Examinations* 

FIHBT TEHM 

College Attendances. From October 1 6th to a variable date in February. 
Examinations. Start on the 1st or 2nd Monday in February whichever 
falls nearest to the 7th of February. 
SECOND TERM 

College Attendances. Start on the Monday following the half Sessional 
Examinations and continue till about June 10th. 

Revision in Quarters.- About June 10th to about June 17th. 
Examinations. About June lith. 

Attendances, These are shown in the Time-table on pages 90 and 91. 
The Course of Study extends over three years and comprises the 
following subjects grouped under six heads : 
GROUP I., ... ... Civil Engineering. 

, II., ... ... Pure and Applied Mathematics. 

,, III., ... ... Surveying and Drawing. 

IV., ... ... Applied Science. 

V., ... ... Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. 

,i VI., ... ... Physique, 



86 COtBSB OF STUDt. 

The marks required at the end of the third year for certificate are 
as follows : 

I. To obtain the Higher Certificate, the minimum pass marks of 33 
per cent, in each Group in each year and in the Project, and 
66 per cent, in the total must be earned, All students winning 
the Higher Certificate will receive preference for Government 
apprenticeships in the order of standing, and will be eligible 
for Government appointments, 

II, To obtain an Ordinary Certificate, the minimum pass marks of 38 

per cent, in each Group in each year, and in the Project, and 

50 per cent, in total must be earned. All students gaining the 

Ordinary Certificate will receive Government apprenticeships 

(as far as these are available) in the order of marks and merit, 

and will be eligible for Government appointments. 

To qualify for return to the College at the end of the first and second 

years, students are required to obtain 33 per cent, of the marks allotted 

to each Group, and 50 per cent, of the total marks. A student failing 

to obtain this standard will not be allowed to return to the College 

unless his failure was due to prolonged absence through sickness, or 

other circumstances beyond his control, in which cases the sanction of 

Government will be required for his re-admission contingent on the 

recommendation of the Principal. 

Photography is a voluntary subject and the marks obtained in this 
subject do not count in the total, but only for the photography prize. 

The Examinations, the marks assigned to them, and the Time-table 
are shown on the following pages. 



CIVIL KNGINEBR CLASS. 



8? 



EXAMINATION AND MARKS, 

(First Year). 
THEORETICAL. 





1 8t half Session. 






2nd half Session. 






Marks. 




Marks. 


1. 


Calculus and Analytical 




1. 


Applied Mechanics I., ... 100 




Geometry, 


. 100 


2. 


fElementary Engineering, 100 


2. 


Graphical Statics, 


. 100 


3. 


General Mathematics, ... 100 


3. 


Mechanics, 


. 100 


4. 


Calculus, ... 100 


4. 


Applied Mechanics, 


. 100 


5. 


Analytical Geometry, ... 100 


5. 


Survey Theory, 


. 100 


6. 


Mechanics, .. 100 


6. 


Physics, 


. 100 


7. 


Applied Mechanics 11., 100 


7. 


Theoretical Chemistry, .. 


. 100 


8. 


Drawing, ... 100 


8. 


Mechanical Engineering, 


10!' 


9. 


Physics, ... 100 








10. 


Theoretical Chemistry, 100 








11. 


Mechanical Engineering, lOu 




800 

i PRACTICAL ANI 


1100 

) CLASS WORK 


1. 


Class Work Mathematics 100 


1. 


Mathematical Note-books, 100 


2. 


Survey Practical, 


. 100 


2. 


Class Work Mathematics 1 00 


3. 


Class Work Physic?, ., 


. 50 


3. 


Drawing, ... 200 


4. 


Practical Chemistry, 


, 100 


4. 


Practical Physics, . . 150 


5. 


Mechanics Laboratory, .. 


. 100 


5. 


Class Work Physics, ... 50 








0. 


Practical Chemistry, ... 100 








1. 


Class Work Chemistry, 100 








8. 


Mechanical Engineering, 100 






450 




"900 






1250 




2000 






TOTALS, 










Marks. 




1st Term, 


.. 


... 1250 




2nd 


.. 


... 2000 


Grand Total, ... 3250 



t Elementary Engineering, A paper on the application of mechanics to the solution of Simple 
Engineering problems. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



1. 

2. 

S. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 



EXAMINATION AND MARKS. 

(Second Year). 

THEORETICAL. 

1st half Session. 

Buildings,f 

Calculus and Differential 

Equations, 
Applied Mechanics, 
Hydraulics, 
Survey Theory, 
Electrical Engineering, 
Applied Chemistry, 
Mechanical Engineering, 
Descriptive Engineering, 



1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 

5. 







2nd half Session. 




Marks. 


Marks, 


.. 100 


I. 


*Civil Engineering I.,... 


100 


1 


2. 


*Civil Engineering II.,... 


100 


.. 100 


3. 


*Civil Engineering III.,... 


100 


.. 100 


4. 


Estimating, 


100 


.. 100 


5. 


Calculus and Differential 




.. 100 




Equations, 


100 


.. 100 


6. 


Applied Mechanics, 


100 


.. 100 


7. 


Electrical Engineering, ... 


100 


f, 100 


8. 


Geology and Mineralogy, 


100 


f, 100 


9. 


Mechanical Engineering, 


100 


900 






900 



PRACTICAL AND CLASS WORK. 



Field Engineering, ... 100 

Class Work Mathematics 100 

Survey, ... 250 
Class Work -Electrical 

Engineering, ... 50 
Mechanical Engineering 

Design, ... 200 



700 
1600 



1. Engineering Note-books 

and Class Work, ... 50 

2. Mathematical Note-books, 100 
g. Class Work Mathematics 100 

4. Civil Engineering Design, 250 

5. Practical Electrical Engi- 

neering, ... 100 

C>. Class Work Electrical 

Engineering, ... 100 

7. Class Work Chemistry 

and Mineralogy, 

8. Mechanical Engineering, 



100 
100 



900 
1800 



TOTALS. 



lat Year, carried forward d%- of 3250), 
2nd 



Marks. 
1300 

3400 



Grand Total, ... 4700 



* I. Theory of Structures, ( Building and Bridges), n. Hydraulics (Engineering ). 
TIL General Ciril Engineering. 

tlheory of Structures, (Buildings). 



CIVIL IN01NI1R CLASS, 

EXAMINATION AND MARKS. 

(Third Year). 

THEORETICAL. 





1st half Session. 


2nd half Session. 






Marks. 


Marki. 


1. 


*0, K I. Buildings, ... 100 


1. *0. E. I. Buildings, ... 


100 


2. 


C. E. II. Irrigation, ... 100 


2. C. E. II. Irrigation, ... 


100 


3. 


0. E. III. Reinforced 


3. C. E. III. Reinforced 






Concrete, ... 100 


Concrete, 


100 


4. 


Sanitary Engineering, ... 100 


4. Bridges, 


100 


5. 


Estimating, ... 100 


5 Water-supply and Sani- 




6. 


Curves and Hydro-Elec- 


tary Engineering, 


100 




tric Surveys, ,. 100 


6. Survey I., 


100 


7, 


Astronomy, ... 100 


7. II., 


10U 


8. 


Electrical Engineering, ... 100 


8, Mechanical Engineering, 


100 


9. 


Mechanical Engineering, 100 


0. Electrical Engineering,.,. 


100 




900 




loo 




PRACTICAL AND CLASS WORK. 




1. 


Survey, t ... ... 100 1. Accounts, ... 


100 


2. 


Civil Engineering Design, 250 


2. Mechanical Engineering, 


100 


3. 


Class WorkElectrical 


3. Process Work, 


100 




Engineering, ... 100 








450 




300 




1350 


1200 




TOTALS. 






Marki. 






1st and 2nd Years' Marks ( T V of 4700), ... 3290 






3rd Year's Marks, ... ... ... 2550 






Project, ... ... ... 1250 






Physique and General Fitness, ... ... 800 






Grand Total, ... 7890 





* Theory of Structures, (Buildings). 



90 COURSE OF STUDY. 

The marks allotted to Civil Engineering Projects are 1250 

Students will be required to qualify in the Projects by obtaining 38 
per cent, marks of the aggregate. 

There will be yearly two or three preliminary projects which will be 
examined by internal examiners, carrying a total of 450 marks, to be 
followed by a final project for which 800 marks will be awarded, to be 
examined and marked by an external examiner. 

The gold medal will be awarded to the student obtaining the highest 
aggregate in all the projects. 

Marks for Physique and General Fitness. 

General Fitness intails discipline, punctuality, general conduct, and 
general fitness throughout the three years' course, as to management of 
coolies at work, etc. Over 10 | of the total marks for the whole three 
years' course are allotted to Physique and General Fitness, and the total 
marks earned, therefore, constitutes a very fair and true record of a 
student's intellectual and physical fitness for the work of an engineer. 

Members of the A. F. 1. and U. T. C. are marked for military 
proficiency, ... ... ... . . 150 

Athletics. Proficiency in games and sports, ... 250 

General Fitness. Physical and moral fitness for work in the 
engineering profession, ... .. ?.. 400 

Total, ... 800 

*Athletm. The 250 marks for proficiency in games and sports 
will be allotted as follows : 

Spirit of Sport, ... ... ... 100 Marks. 

Swimming, -. ... ... 30 

. Athletic Sports, ... ... ... 30 

Games, (1) Boating, (2) Tennis and Squash Racquets, (3) Football 
(4) Hockey, (5) Cricket. Any three will carry 90 marks. 



TIME-TABLfcff. 91 



TIME-TABLES. 



COUIltl OF ITTJDY. 



Saturda 



1 

A 

H 



Tu 



1 



ri 
' 



*-* 

32 
-JH 

"5 be ; 

.8.S * 

> 6 



^ PQ 



55858 

0) jg J ft) E, js 



! rn^i|.? 

S-S-S-F, S S 






S.-S 



j 'S 8-S'S 
t^ M >y o > 

3 3JC r 



g J3 g W) b 

S c w c 

<D w -r; * 

jB S 43 ^ 






,.- 

r o ex o 4= jz 



O .M 






H - H . 



. 

.3 .5 



. 

C ^ 



il 






tt a a o ys 

CO Cfl W W l/> 



OWN 
ob 6 o - ^ w cV> 



1 



*>** 



.. SW 

X^ M * 

2.8: . 8 > 



"" SB 



. 

J u o 



. . 
C b/J 5ft 

W c c 



^ 



:J*3.f .S^ 
S*frl 8 ?W 

^ J:l8-r 

3 O w.2 



O N 

ab ao A 1 < 



?! 



II 





AS 

a* 



& 

H 



i| 
** 

>< 



*,'0 

II 



I 



Iff 



* 

-- 
-- 



U'o/K.S 



5 > J "3 
111 il 



CIVIL fiNaiNEBR CLASS, 



<CQ 
43 ja 

JSJS 



b 
Cd 



U 



<M 

li-s-s 



. bA bA 

bAC C 

H M . M . 



. w w g Q Q 
sOutSuu 



ifijl 

111152 



8 - 

2-jj 5 g 

-j c c Q Q 



j 

bAbijbA 



^ . c c 

o* . g bobA 

j j 5'g 

^ . us Q Q 



C C C 
3 3 ' 'OT "w 

LH P>H ^ O fl> 

c 1 ^bA bAbA 

Ld W G <= C 
CcJ *" [x] W 

wwuctfuu 






< w o J cu a, 



en uo u oi u u 



c c c c 



woutfub 



c c 
0^5* 

) "Jfl 'Jin 



I^IIIS 
WUUOiUU 



a a a 

O O O OT n 

JC X ^C ~rt "Q 

(O (0 OT trt S 2 



M M G g> gt 

o o tj n: .-s 



w* w w 

a, a, a. 

O O O 



MbA 



< W <> (j (j 



O C< 

97 7 77 

00 O\ O - M M 



I 



I 
1 



1 



111 III 

!H? A I 

t* ^ *j jy 

j 2 - 9 
5 o-g 

5 I" 



S 
'Sb 

gS 

Se;.-? 



3 n^ 

5 O cfl 

a 5'g 

3 * S 

a a g 

5 a^ 
g AS 

H-d 

I 2 

o 



I? 



3rd Year Project 
st Year after the 



CITIL INatHKKR CLASS. 95 



Group L-DEPAETMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEER- 
ING- 



BUILDING MATERIALS. * 

(1st Year, 2nd half session). 

Stone. Selection. Characteristics. Indian and European stones 
Quarrying. Blasting. Dressing stone. Implements. 

Bricks and Tiles. Classes of bricks and their distinguishing quali- 
ties. Moulding. Drying and stacking, Brick-burning. Types of Kiln. 
Firebricks. Terrn-cotta. Tile manufacture. 

Cements, Limes and Mortars Use of mortar. Natural and 
artificial cements. Varieties of limes. Hydraulicity, Burning. Clamps, 
Kilns. Plaster. Whitewash. Distemper. Concrete. Portland cement, 

Timber. Growth of trees. Felling trees. Classification and proper- 
ties of Indian and other woods. Most suitable woods for particular 
purposes 



CARPENTRY. * 

(1st Year, 2nd half session). 
Elementary carpentry as applied to Civil Engineering. 



MASONRY, t 
(2nd Year, 1st half session). 

Stone Masonry. Ashlar of various sorts. Block-in-course, Bond 
Dressing stone. Rubble masonry, Safe loads. Lewis. Dowel. Joggle. 
Cramp. Template. Scaffolding. Shears. Derrick. Gryn. Gantry. 

Brick Masonry. Types and their uses. Bond. Closers. Bedding 
Moisture. Scaffolding, Precautions against settlement. Backing Back. 
Plastering. Pointing. Coping. Cornice. Blocking Course, Parapet. 
Eaves Course. Corbel. LinteL Jamp. Reveal. Sill. Footing 
Drip Course. Pise walling. Qhajji walling. Hollow masonry, Rein- 
forced brick-work. 

* Included in the paper on Elementary Engineering. 
t Included in the paper on Descriptive Engineering. 



96 SYLLA10I, 

Miscellaneous, Retaining walls. Depth of foundations. Counter* 
forts and buttresses. Revetments. Construction and sinking of masonry 
wells. Simple masonry dams. Technical names of various parts. 



EARTHWORK * 

(2nd Fair, 1st half session). 

Definitions. Contracts. Stability and properties of soils. Measure- 
ment and Setting-out. Instruments used. Section and Volumes, 
Drainage. Puddling. Consolidation. Dressing and turfing. Rates, 
lift and lead. 



FIELD ENGINEERING. 

(2nd year). 

(t). Use of Spars. Various knots and lashings and the suit- 
ability of each to certain circumstances. Coiling and hand- 
ling of ropes. Blocks and trackle. Reeving of blocks. Use 
of handspikes and rollers. Holdfasts. Guys. Use and 
construction of derricks, shears, gyns, and trestles in placing 
girders or columns in position in building or for other similar 
work. 

(ii). Ground Tracing. General principles (Masonry Manual), 
Working plans for foundations on level ground and on slopes. 
Trenches with vertical and with sloping sides Laying-out 
buildings on the ground and similar practical instruction. 

THEORY OP STRUCTURES (BUILDINGS), t 

(2nd Year, 1st half session). 

Consideration of materials used in the construction of Hoof trusses. 
Steel and timber. Determination of stresses in trusses by various 
methods. Dead loads and wind pressures. Factors of safety and work- 
ing stresses. 

Lectures and exercises on the design of roof trusses. Various types of 
roof trusses and roof coverings, collar beam and hammer beam trusses. 

* Included in the paper on Descriptive Engineering. 
f Included in the paper on Building*. 



OIVIL BMQIMRKE GLASS, 97 

Use of E tiler's, Gordon's, Rankine's, Fidler's, Johnson's and straight 
line formulas in the design of struts. Buckling Factor of struts ; carrei 
showing comparatively strength of struts obtained by various formula*. 
Choice of size of sections. Finish of steel work. Joints. Design of end 
bearings methods of fixing and supporting ends, specifications and 
estimating. 

(2nd Year, 2nd half Session)* 

Application of circle and ellipse of stress and Clapyron's theorem 
to design of structures, 

Cast Iron and Steel columns. Flange and web connections to Steel 
Columns, Caps Bases, Transverse Bracing of Columns. 

Foundations. Safe pressures. Foundations for columns, Slab founda- 
tions, cantilever foundations, grillage foundations, wells. Piles. 

Retaining Walls and Earth pressures. Rankine's theory, Wedge 
theory, with corrections, Bligh's graphical Construction. Design of 
various types of Retaining walls in Masonary. 

Tall Masonry and Steel Chimney. Theory and Design with reference 
to a particular example. 

Design of steel and masonry Reservoirs with considerations of wind 
pressures. 

Fire-proof construction. 

Elementary theory of Reinforced Concrete Structures, simple beam, 
Column and Slab. 

Reinforced Brick-work design Beams, Floors, etc. 

(3rd Year, 1st half Session) .f 

Deflection of framed structures and determination of stresses, etc,, in 
redundant frames. 

Influence Diagrams for Bending Moment and shear for uniformly 
distributed and irregular loads on Trusses, built in beams and three 
pinned, parabolic, semi-elliptic and semi-circular arches. 

General principles of Dome design. 

Principles of Building Design. Consideration of loads on buildings. 
Steel work, Girders, etc., for buildings. 

* Included iu the paper Civil Engineering I. 
Included in the paper Civil Engineering I,, Building!. 



98 SYLLABUI. 

Design of a residental bungalow with special reference to selection 
of site, construction of walls, damp-proof courses, water-supply drainage 
and ventilation. 

Thomson's principles of similar structures as regards their strength, 
stability, deflections, etc. 

THEORY OP STRUCTURES (BRIDGES) 

(2nd Year, 2nd half Session). 

Design- Selection of site. Determination of discharge of river by 
consideration of area of watershed, intensity of rainfall and by zoning. 
Waterway to be provided. Depth of scour. 

Design of foundations. Box, crate, well, pile, continuous masonry or 
Reinforced concrete slab. Piers, ordinary and abutment. Floors and 
curtain walls. 

Design of superstructure. Determination by graphical and analytical 
methods of B. M. due to moving loads. Wind pressures. 

Design of masonry bridges and culverts. . 

Plate web girders. Analysis of stresses. 

Warren and Lattice girders. 

Three-pinned arcbes, doubly-pinned and rigid arches. 

General considerations on the design of suspension, cantilever, and 
tubular bridges. 

Steel arched bridges. 

Swing Bridges. 

REINFORCED CONCRETE. 

(3rd Tear, 1st half Session). 

Nature, uses, properties ; advantages and disadvantages of Reinforced 
Concrete over other types of constructions. Assumptions made in theory 
of stress in R. C. beams. 

Theory and Design of simple beams, T-beams an( * s ^ a ^ s f r different 
conditions of loading. 

Shear, bond, and diagonal tension, and their nature and evaluation ; 
location of reinforcement. 

Theory and design of doubly-reinforced beams, continuous beanii, 
columns piles, Slab Foundations, and Simple Cantilever and Counterfort 
typei of Retaining walls. 



CIVIL ENGINEER OLAB8, 99 

Equivalent moments of inertia for R. C. sections. 
Theory of Elastic deflections and outline of investigation of stresses 
in Reinforced Concrete Arches. 



ESTIMATING 

(2nd Year, 2nd half Session). 

Rules for taking out quantities in earth work, masonry flooring, wood work, 
mouldings, arches, groyned roofs,domes, steel work, and plumbers work. 

Calculation of probable quantities of materials required to be furnished 
for the completion of work, 

Common rates and their analysis. 

Rates for carriage of material by different means of transport. 

Specifications, contracts, and contract law. 



(3rd Year, 1st half Session). 

Detailed Estimates of some of the designs carried out by the students 
in the Civil Engineering Design Course. 



HYDRAULICS (ENGINEERING) 

(2nd Year, 2nd half Session). 
Irrigation and Power. 

General theory of the flow of water. Stream line motion. Bernoulli's 
theorem and its application to the venturi meter. Flow of water in 
open channels. Chezy, Bazin, Manning and Kutter formula}. Appli- 
cation to design of canals and distributaries. Silt transportation formu- 
las and their application to design of regime channels. Theory of 
scour as applied to rivers, Flow of water through siphons. Falls free 
and drowned. Notches on falls. Water cushions. Afftux and back 
water curves. 

Methods of gauging discharges. Modules and semi-modules. Hy- 
draulics and hydrostatics of weirs and dams. Standing waves. Flood 
absorption formula?. 

Utilization of water as a source of power. Mills. Hydrautomats, 
Hydraulics of power plants from source to delivery to turbine. 
Water-Supply. 

Rational and empirical formulae for the flow of water through pipes. 
Lmiting, mean and critical velocities. Distribution of velocity in pipes 
and relation between diameter and discharge. Economical diameter of 



100 SYLLABUS. 

pipe lines. Initiation and stoppage of motion in a pipe. Water hammer. 
Hydraulic gradient. Losses on straight pipes and at bends, elbows and 
tees Time of discharge through long pipe lines, branch mains and 
multiple supply. Flow through bye-pass and pipes coupled in parallel. 
Flow through terminal nozzles Meters, siphons, Pitot tubes, Pitometers, 
pumps and rams. Calculation of compensation water. 

GENERAL CIVIL ENGINEERING-* 

(2nd Year, 2nd half Session). 
Irrigation. 

Definition of irrigation. Conditions necessitating its introduction. 
Principal Indian crops, their seasons, and benefits derived from irrigation. 
Depth of water required to ensure maturity. Cultivated and irrigated 
areas of India. 

Well as a source of irrigation. Lined and unlined wells. Sub-soil 
water reservoir. Duty of wells. Area irrigable from a well. 

Canals as a source of irrigation. Perennial canals. Duty of canal 
water. Depths and running days. Supplies utilised and lost. Silt and 
its effect on irrigation channels : its prevention. Kennedy channels. 
Design of channels from Garrett's diagrams. 

Evaporation absorption and percolation. Rise in the sub-soil water 
level. Water logging. Lining of canals. 

Special features of inundation canals. When necessitated. General 
description, location of off-take to avoid silling. 
Water-Supply. 

Sonives of supply. Springs, wells, rivers and lakes. Selection of a 
suitable source. Special features of tube-wells. Reservoirs. Impounding 
storage and service reservoirs. Water towers. 

Waterwork. Intakes, settling tanks, filters, rates of filtration, various 
types of mechanical filtration. 

Pipes. Rising mains, expansion joints, losses in head, valves, service 
tanks, house connection meters, cisterns, etc, 

Pumping installations. General types of pumping installations used 
in India. 

Roads. 

Formation and permanent way. Types of roadways. Hill roads. 
Ruling gradients. Resistance of vehicles. Drainage, Tramways and 
motor transport. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 101 

Railways. 

Formation permanent way and gauges. Tractive force. Super-eleva- 
tion. Light railways. Mountain railways. Tunneling. 

Miscellaneous. 

Piles and pile driving. Sheet, screw, and interlocking piling. 
Diving operations, reclamations, and dredging. 

IRRIGATION. 

(3rd Year, 1st half Session). 

Perennial Canals Sources of supply. River discharges. General 
description of Indian rivers. Location and Design of Roadworks in 
boulder, trough and delta stages of a river. Hydraulics and Hydro- 
statics of Headworks. Weirs and Diidersluices. Hend Regulators. 
Supply Channels. Afflux Bunds. Temporary Diversion Bunds. Per- 
manent Weirs. Various types of same. Drop Shutters, Automatic 
gates. Btoney Sluice Gates. 

Design and Alignment of Canals Attainment of Water shed. 
Falls. Bridges. Regulators. Locks. Escapes. Roads. Distrihu- 
tories and Minors. Their design and running. Outlets. 

Cross Drainage Works Maximum rate of run-off from Catch- 
ments. Inlets. Super-passages. Level Crossings. Aqueducts. Sy- 
phons. Reservoirs. 

Tanks and Reservoirs Tanks. Flank Escapes. Outlet Sluices. 
Total run-off from catchments. Reservoirs for storage of water. Earthen 
Dams. Masonry Dams. Theory of their stability and design. Open 
Weirs. Bams with discharge sluices. Syphon dams. Escapes. Flood 
absorptive capacity of reservoirs. 

Elvers Training Works Spurs. Groynes. Bell Bunds. Stream 
line Bunds. Mattresses. Aprons, 



* SANITARY ENGINEERING. 

(3rd Year). 

Two lectures and one tutorial period a week during the 1st half session. 
Sanitary laws, refuse removal and disposal, the chemistry of sewage ; 
House Sanitation. 

Selection of Sites for house building, house drainage, traps ; Sewerage 
Systems, Sewers, their design and Construction. 
Principles of Design and Construction of Sewage Disposal Works. 



12 SYLLABT78. 

Incinerators and absorption pits ; trenching. 

River Pollution and its effects. 

Irrigation and Sewage Farms ; Details of 8eptic and other types of 
tanks, contact beds and Activated Sludge System of Sewage Disposal, 
Filters and Filtration ; Distributors and Sprinklers. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING DESIGN. 

(2nd* and Brd\ Tears). 

This course is intended to supplement the lectures in Theory of Struc- 
tures (Buildings and Bridges), General Engineering, Irrigation and 
Reinforced Concrete. The student will be required to design a number 
of structures under professional supervision and guidance, 

The course will include the design of masonry buildings, masonry and 
steel bridges, reinforced concrete bridges and buildings, retaining walls, 
masonry dams and aqueducts. 



PROCESS WORE. 

(3rd Year). 

Apparatus- General description of materials required, where these 
may be procured, approximate estimate of their cost. 

Working Room How an ordinary room may be made suitable for 
Ferrotype work. 

Paper Qualities desirable in paper. 

Tracings. Tracing cloth and tracing paper. Essential points to be 
observed in the preparation and preservation of tracings. Suitable inks, 
Effects of colour washes on resulting Ferrotype prints. 

Chemicals -Chemicals required, with formulae for mixing. Precau- 
tions to be observed in storing, 

Printing Explanation of the action of light on iron salts. The 
Ferro- prussiate and Perro-gallic printing processes. How paper negatives 
may be made with silver salts from which positive prints, ferro-prnssiate 
or silver may be made. 

* 2nd half session. Included in Civil Engineering Desing under Practical and 
Clasts Work. 

f 1st half smion. Design under Practical and Class Work. 

2nd half nemon. Included in Project. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 108 

Developing, intensifying, reducing, trimming and removal of defects. 
Methods of making additions of lines, figures, etc.,, by chemical or other 
means. 

Practical Course A tracing to be prepared specially for repro- 
duction work by each student. Three copies of Ferro-gallic and three 
copies of Ferrotype, from the tracing, to be submitted on papers which 
are sensitised and of wnich all the manipulations are to be carried out by 
the student himself. Three copies in each of the above-named processes 
to be submitted, prepared from commercial ready-sensitised papers, all 
Other manipulations being carried out by the student. 

ACCOUNTS 

(2nd half, 3rd Year Session). 

Explanation of the ordinary terms used in book-keeping as they arise 
during the course. Description and uses of the following : 

Cash book ; petty cash and imprest ; invoice or purchases book ; 
stock book ; day or sales book : bills book ; the ledger ; single 
and double entry ; the journal ; balancing the ledger ; simple 
balance sheets. 

Students will work out examples after the necessary explanations 
have been given. 



104 SYLLABUB. 



Qroup IL-DEPARTMENT OP PURE AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS* 



GENERAL MATHEMATICS* 

(Including Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry and Men- 
suration). 

No lectures will be provided in these subjects which are included in 
the syllabus of the Entrance Examination. But students will be 
examined on that syllabus supplemented by the following : 
Theory and Practice of the Slide Rule. 



MATHEMATICS* 

(1st Year). 

During the first half session, two lectures and three tutorial periods 
weekly ; during second half session, two lectures and two tutorial periods 
weekly. 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY* 

No lectures will be provided for the portion of the subject included in 
the syllabus of the Entrance Examination. But students will be 
examined on that syllabus supplemented by the following course : 

(a). Plane Geometry The straight Line Law. Elementary 
treatment of hyperbola, logarithmic curve, circular curves, cycloid, 
epicycloid, witch of Agnesi and cissoid. Further properties of the conic 
sections and the reduction of the general equation of the second degree, 

(5). Solid Geometry- Representation of a point. Direction cosines, 
etc. Geometry of the Plane and the Straight line, Surfaces of revolution 
and Notions of Developable surfaces. Elementary treatment of sphere, 
right circular cone and cylinder, ellipsoid, paraboloid and hyperboloid of 
one sheet. 

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. 

Infinitesimals and limits, definition of function, continuous functions, 
their properties and geometrical representation. (Graphs of elementary 
tail some simple function). Limiting value of a function ; special limit- 
ing values. 

* Stress is laid on graphical Methods* 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 106 

Derived functions. Geometrical and Physical illustrations, Standard 
forms, rules for differentiation, inverse circular functions and their deriva- 
tives. Successive differentiation. Applications of a derivative* Differ- 
entials and application bo correction of small errors, Sign of the derivative. 
Mean value Theorem, etc. Maxima and Minima values of a function of 
a single variable. 

Geometrical applications of the derivative : 

Tangents and Normals. Polar co-ordinates. Points of inflection. 
Ourvature. Curve tracing. 

INTEGRAL CALCULUS- 

Integration. As inverse of differentiation. Standard forms. Rules 
for integration. Integration by substitution and integration by parts. 
Integration by reduction. 

Integration as the limit of a sum : 

Problem of areas, connection with inverse differentiation. Definite 
Integrals and their properties. Simple cases of double integrals. 

Applications Quadrature and Rectification of curves. Surfaces 
and volumes of solids of revolution. Centres of Gravity. Theorem of 
Pappus and Guldinus. Moments of Inertia. 

(2nd Year). 

During the first half session, one lecture and two tutorial periods 
weekly ; during second half session, one period weekly. 
Farther applications : 
(a). Partial differentiation. Differentiation of implicit functions. 

Total differentiation and application to small errors. 
(b). Planimetric applications. Intrinsic equation of a Curve. 
Catenary Problems. Theory of transition curves. Approxi- 
mate integration and Simpson's rule. 

Differential Equations Formation. Equations of the first order 
and first degree. Special cases. Integrating factor, Linear differential 
equations of the first order with constant co-efficients, Clairaut'e 
form. 

Geometrical, Physical and Engineering problems including Vibrations, 
etc. Linear equations with constant co-efficients. Particular integrals 
and their determination in simple cases. Expansion of functions by 
Taylor's and Maclaurin's series and by differential equations. Applica* 
tions to Maxima and Minima. Elementary Fonrrier's Series. 



10$ StLLAiJUS. 

MECHANICS 

No lectures will be provided for the portion of the subject included 
in $ie Syllabus of the Entrance Examinations. But students will be 
examined on that syllabus supplemented by the following course. 

(1st Year). 

During the first half session, two periods in the laboratory, and one 
lecture and one tutorial period weekly ; during second half session, one 
lecture and one tutorial period weekly. 

(a). Graphic Statics Representation and Composition, etc,, of 
forces. Funicular polygon and its applications ; conditions of equili- 
brium. Graphical determination of stresses in frames. Effect of wind 
loads. Method of sections. Displacement diagrams. 

(#). Dynamics Relative velocity, tangential and normal accelera- 
tions. D'Alemfrerts Principle. Angular momentum and related 
problems, motion about a fixed axis. Compound Pendulum. 

(c). Hydrostatics (with introduction to Hydraulics), Fluid 
pressure on surfaces in contact. Centre of Pressure. Laws of floatation 
and Metacentre. Simple Machines depending on fluid pressure and 
elementary notions about fluids in motion leading up to Bernoulli's 
Theorem. 

(d). Mechanical Laboratory. The majority of the experiments 
here will be made by the students themselves in accordance with written 
instructions issued to them. The objects of such experiments will be as 
follows: To accustom the students to the use of accurate measuring 
instruments ; to illustrate the principles of elementary mechanics ; to 
verify the laws of motion, impact, friction and proportionality of stress 
and strain ; to determine elastic constants for different materials, 
moments of inertia, centres of gravity, co-efficients oi velocity, contrac- 
tion and discharge for different orifices in hydraulics ; to illustrate the 
use of section paper in plotting experimental results for the reduction of 
empirical formulae 

APPLIED MECHANICS. 

(1st Year). 

During the whole session one lecture and one tutorial period weekly. 
I. Theory Of structures Analysis of stress and strain. Rela- 
tion between elastic constants. Torsion of circular shafts. Combined 



CIVIL INGINBBB OLAI8. 10t 

torsion and longitudinal stresses. Working stresses in a structura 
member and determination of its dimensions. Elastic limit and ultimate 
strength. 8 tresses due to repitition of applied loads and due to dynami- 
cally applied loads. Bending moment and shearing force diagrams for 
beams and cantilevers due to dead loads only ; relation between B.M. and 
3.F. diagrams, Theory of bending of beams, fibre stresses, modulus of 
section, moment of resistance, distribution of shear stress and principal 
stresses in a beam. 

II*. Analysis of Compound and conjugate stresses. Rankine's 
theory of earth pressure, depth of foundations and strength of footings. 
Coulomb's theory of earth pressure ; modification due to Rebahnn. 
Application of the principle of virtual work to deflections in framed 
structures and to finding stresses in frames with one redundant member. 



HydrauliOflHydro-kinetics, uniform and steady flow, stream line 
and turbulent motion. Bernoulli's theorem and its application. 

(2nd Year). 

During the first half nession, three lectures and three tutorial periods 
weekly ; during the second half session one lecture weekly, and two 
tutorial periods weekly till middle of April 

Theory of structures. Bending moment and shearing force diagram 
for live loads. Analysis of uniform and uniformly varying stress. Stresses 
due to eccentric loads. Stresses in chimney and masonry dams. Line of 
resistance. Stability of blockwork structures. Stresses in riveted joints 
and in boiler shells. Bending in columns due to direct and eccentric 
loads. Rankiue's, Gordon's and other formulas. Deflections of simply 
supported, fixed and continuous beams. Theorem of three moments, 
Flexible chains. Theory of elastic arches. Masonry arches, 

Hydraulics Discharge through orifices and mouth-pieces, and over 
notches and weirs. Flood absorption. Discharge when the head varies. 
Laws of fluid friction. Heads lost due to frictiou, sadden enlargement 
and contraction and alter causes. Flow through pipe* and channels. 
Chezy's and other formula? for velocity of flow. Channel cross-sections 
of greatest efficiency. 

* Treated graphically. 



108 StLLABtJB, 



Group IIL-DEPARTMENT OP SURVEY AND 
DRAWING. 



SURVEY. 

(1st Year, 1st Session). 

Construction of Scales. Conventional signs. Use and adjustment of 
instruments, vide Survey Manual Part I. Theory of levelling, simple, 
compound, check and reciprocal levelling. Various causes of errors 
in levelling. Elimination of such errors. Customary limits of error. 
Level drill in the field. Method of keeping various style bf field-books 
Use of boning rods. Chain survey. Chain and compass survey. 



(2nd Year, 1st Session). 

Theodolite traversing by Gale's traverse system for city and town 
improvement surveys, Sources of errors and required precision in 
traversing. Traverse tables. Theory and use of the simple plane-table 
and tangent clinometer. Theory and use of the stadia method of plane- 
tabling with levelled heights and reductions of distances and heights by 
slide rule. The three-point problem or plane-tabling by resection from 
within and without the triangle. Geometrical and trigonometrical proof 
of the three-point problem. The two-point problem with and without 
the magnetic compass. Triangulation with reciprocal value heights of 
stations, base line measurements. Finding values of position by obser- 
vations to three known points. Computation by rectangular co-ordinates 
with convergeucy correction. 



For periods see time-tables pages 8 and 9. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, 109 

Contouring of the triangulated area by heights calculated from the 
reduced levels. Longitudinal and cross sections run with a Level. The 
location on the map of a road, railway, canal or weir, etc. The general 
principles of tunnel alignment and of carrying surface meridians under- 
ground for mine surveys. Discussion on the latest patterns of instru- 
ments. 



PRACTICAL ASTRONOMY. 

(2nd Year, 2nd Session and 3rd Year, 1st Session). 

Introduction to Spherical Trigonometry up to the solution of the 
spherical triangle and the adaptation of Napier's rules of circular parts. 
Definitions, systems of celestial co-ordinates, the reasons for sidereal, sun 
and mean time, acceleration, retardation and equation of time. The 
Julian and Gregorian calendars, time and the various astronomical 
corrections. 

The practical course consists in finding the meridian of a place by 
observations to the sun or a star at upper culmination, by equal altitudes, 
by the sun or stars not on the meridian, and by circumpolar stars at 
elongation ; and in finding time by the sun or stars on the meridian and 
erc-meridian ; and in finding latitude by Polaris and circummeridional 
observations. Use and construction of Sundials. 



CURVES AND ALIGNMENTS. 

(2nd Year, 2nd Session and 3rd Year t 1st Session). 

Theory of curves, Curves laid out with the aid of angular instru- 
ments. Curves laid out by linear measurement only, By chords and 
offsets (several methods). By offsets inside the curve. Curve by ordi- 
nates from the long chord. Curve with certain giv*en data to pass 
through a ruling point, Compound curves. Diversion curve. Vertical 
curves. Curve spir or Transition curve. Double centre method for 
laying-out a straight line. Setting out pegs for earthwork. Computation 
of areas of cross sections, etc. 



110 flTLLABOS, 

HYDRO-ELEGTRIG PURVEYS, 

(3rd Year, 1st Session), 



Topographical maps, how to study and read them, areas suitable for 
water power schemes, preliminary reconnaissance, catchment areas, rain- 
fall nnd run off. Barlow's percentages, approx: discharges of streams 
and rivers, capacity of water impounded, hydrographical methods of 
survey, pipe line alignment, tunnel alignment, forebay, transmission 
line survey, Instruments nsed on reconnaissance, preliminary survey 
and final contour survey. 



DRAWING. 

(1st Year, 1st and 2nd Sessions). 

The following course has been formulated to carry the student step 
by step in the technique of drawing as a preparation for a course in 
Engineering Design and Survey Mapping. 

Architectural colouring. Projection of Solids. Planes and Lines. 
Contour location plan. Isometric projection. Intersection and Develop- 
ment of Solids. Perspective, Survey plan. Drawing of simple masonry 
structures. Railway or road plan and section. Sketches of models, etc, 
Building, plans, elevations, sections of Building from measurement. 

Note. All drawing plates must be done in College during drawing attendances 
and they must have the date of commencement and completion, with the student's 
name and order of standing in the class, 



CIVIL ENftlNEEtl CLASS, ill 



Group IVDEPARTMENT OP APPLIED 
SCIENCE 



INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

(1st Year). 

Two lectures weekly throughout the session, 

The course will comprise a general discussion of the properties of the 
elements and their more important compounds from the standpoint of 
the Periodic Law, and will include a systematic study of the metals 
and non-metals. The following topics will also be dealt with : nature 
of physical and chemical change; combustion; chemical affinity; the 
laws rtf chemical combination ; the atomic theory; the gas laws and the 
kinetic theory of gases ; vapour density ; specific heat ; chemical' 
equivalents ; atomic and molecular weights ; Valency ; chemical eqtifc- 
tions ; calculations of quantities by weight and by volume; mass actWti'; 
isomorphism ; solution ; diffusion ; dissociation ; the properties' dF 
colloids; electrolysis. 

Th6 syllabus is specially arranged to prepare engineering students for 
the 2nd year course which treats of the application of chemistry to 
engineering practice, and, in particular, with the properties and charac- 
teristics of engineering materials. 



U2 8YLLAB08. 

PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

(1st Year). 

Two afternoons a week during the first half session, and one afternoon 
a week daring the second half session. 

The practical work in the chemical laboratory will cover the general 
principles of qualitative analysis and elementary quantitative analysis. 
The professional engineer is not expected to be able to carry out the 
chemical analyses he requires, but he should be able to understand and able 
also to interpret intelligently the reports received from a professional 
analytical chemist. The practical course in chemistry has, therefore, been 
drawn up with this object in view. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

(2nd Year). 

One lecture a week during the 1st half session. 

The manufacture of iron and steel. Comprising a discussion of the 
following : 

Metallurgical terms j ores ; fuel ; refractory materials ; furnaces . 
urnace temperatures ; the production of pig-iron and wrought-iron ; a 
brief description of the more important methods of steel manufacture ; 
the chemical composition of pig-iron, wrought-iron and steel ; the effect 
of impurities ; corrosion ; and protection of iron steel ; a short descrip- 
tion of the properties of the rarer metals employed in the production of 
bertain kinds of steel ; steel alloys, cooling curves ; metallography. 

The properties and composition of the remaining common alloys, e.g. t 
gun-metal, phosphor-bronze, brass, solder, etc. 

Decay in timber : methods used for preventing decay. 

Quicklime, hydraulic lime, cements, their chemical composition and 
preparation ; the setting and hardening of motar and cements. 

Faints ; and varnishes preparation and use of the common pigments, 



CIVIL BHOINRHR CLASS. 



etc* Preparation of glass, soluble glass, porcelain, pottery and bricks,, 

Natural waters, their chemical composition, analysis, bacteriological 
examination and suitability for various purposes. Preservation of struc- 
tural materials. 



PHYSICS. 

(1st Year). 

Two lectures and two practical periods, a week, during the whole 
session, 

1. General. Commercial and some special methods of measuring 
density. Transmission of pressure in fluids and its application to 
hydraulic press and transmission of power for industrial purposes. 

Aneroid and Fortin barometer with their characteristic errors and 
uses. Pressure and vacuum pumps ; monometers and pressure gauges. 
Hooke's law and its applications. 

2. Heat High and low temperature measurement. Practical appli- 
cations of the expansion of solids, liquids and gases by heat. Absolute 
zero. 

Vapour pressure. Methods of measuring storage pressure ; flash 
point. Determination of height by hypsometer. Total heat of steam; 
superheated steam ; methods of measuring dryness of steam. 

Heat transmission ; methods of measuring heat-insulating properties 
of non-conductors. Ventilation of buildings. Newton's and Stefan's 
laws of cooling. Determination of loss of heat from a surface by 
radiation. 

Elementary discussion of the principles of thermo-dynamics ; Ideal 
heat engine cycles ; principles of refrigeration ; entropy. Calorific 
value of fuels. 

3. Light Optical properties and applications of parabolic and 

cylindrical mirrors, cylindrical and prismatic lenses and totally reflecting; 
prisms, 



W4 SYLLABUS. 

Spherical and chromatic aberration; defects in images due to these 
ttnd methods of minimising the defects. 

Dispersion and spectrum analysis. 

Simple optical instruments. Sextant, telescope, microscope, range- 
finders ; eye- pieces. Hnyghen, Ramsden and terrestrial. 

Photometry and modern forms of photometers. 
Porarisation with simple applications. 

4. Sound, Accoustic properties of buildings and prevention of 
echoes. Elementary discussion of vibrations. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. Electrostatic unit of quantity. 
Potential, capacity, condenser, energy of a condenser, Quadrant 
electrometer. 

Production and propagation of electric waves. Principles of wireless 
transmission and reception. Description of a wireless receiving set. 

Measurement of P.O., current and resistance by potentiometer. 
Book e.m.f. in electrolysis. Secondary cells, 

Electrical, mechanical and heat units of energy. 

Electro-magnetism and instruments. 

Electro-magnetic induction. 

'Magnetisation ; permeability and its measurement ; hysteresis. 



Jfyte. A comprehensive course of practical work will be carried out by each 
student during the laboratory periods. 



MINERALOGY AND GEOLOGY 

(2nd Tear). 

Two lectures and one practical period a week during the 2nd half sessitm. 

Mineralogy Crystal form and symmetry ; division into systems ; 
their principal characteristics ; classification based upon (a) chemical 
composition, (b) physical properties, e.g., specific gravity, hardness, 
cleavage, fracture, phenomena relating to light ; simple description and 
identification of rock-forming minerals, ores, veinstones, salts and 



CIVIL ENmNREH CLA8S. US 

Geology*- Elementary discussion of the geological agents, their influ- 
ence in effecting geological changes, and the records left by them. Simple 
description of the principles of structural geology ; sedimentary and 
igneous rock ; use of fossils ; elementary discussion of the general 
principles of historical geology, including a brief description of the 
geological record of the history of the Earth with a short discussion of 
the chief characteristics of the following divisions : 



1. Archaean. 

2. Palaeozoic. 



3. Mesozoic. 

4. Tertiary. 



5. Post Tertiary. 

A short description of the stratigraphic&l geology of India. 

Practical Course. The object of the practical work is to enable 
the student to identify the more common ores, salts, and rock-forming 
materials by the application of simple, physical and chemical tests. 



116 SYLLABUS. 



Group V.-DEPARTMENT OP MECHANICAL 

AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING* 



DESCRIPTIVE ENGINEERING. 

(1st Year). 

One lecture and one tutorial a week during the 1st half session. 

One lecture a week during 2nd half session. 

Boilers. -Cornish, Lancashire, locomotive, vertical, and water-tube 
boilers. Boiler details. Safety valves, check valves, feed pumps. Super- 
heaters. Feed-water beaters. Oil separators. Boiler room instruments. 

Engines. Modern, High and Low-speed steam engines. Types of 
Gas and Oil engines. Steam Turbines. Engine details. 

General arrangement of Power-house Auxiliary Machinery. 

Hydraulics Plunger, centrifugal and turbine pumps. 

Pelton wheel, inward and outward flow turbines. 

Machine Tools. General description of lathes, drilling, shaping and 
milling machines. 

Arrangement of shafting and belting in a machine shop. 

THEORY OF MACHINES. 

One lecture a week during 2nd half session. 

Kinematics Kinematic chains. Relative motion. Point paths. 
Angular velocity. Instantaneous centre. 

Transmission of motion by belts. Speed cones. Fast and loose 
pulleys. Belt-driving between non-parallel shafts. 

Friction rollers and toothed wheels. Pitch surfaces and lines. Kine- 
matic conditions to be satisfied by profiles of teeth. Involute and cycloidal 
teeth. Trains of wheels. Epicylic trains. Reversing mechanisms using 
toothed wheels. 

Workshop Course. Two attendances per week throughout first 
ytar. Practical work in Carpenter's, Fitting and Machine Shops, 



OIYIL ENGINEER CLASS* 11? 

(2nd Year). 

One lecture a week throughout the session* 

Conversion of reciprocating into rotary motion. The slider crank chain. 
Mechanism of a shaping machine. Quicfc-return motion, 

Friction. Laws of friction as depending on velocity and pressure. 
Friction of greased surfaces. Friction of belts on pulleys. Transmission 
of power by belts and ropes. Slipper and band brakes. Dynamometers. 

Dynamics of Reciprocating Engines Piston acceleration and 
velocity diagrams. Angular velocity of connecting rod. Forces due 
of inertia of reciprocating parts. Crank effort diagram. Fluctuation 
of energy. Function of fly-wheels. Function of a governor. Simple 
pendulum and loaded governors. Effect of friction on governors. 
Governor effect and power. 

Valve Gears Simple slide valve. Valve diagrams. Independent 
cut-off gears, Reversing gears and link motions. Radial gears. Piston 
valves. Corliss and other trip gears. 

Elementary treatment of balancing problems. 



BEHAVIOUR OF MATERIALS UNDER STRESS. 

One lecture a week throughout 2nd term. 

Elastic limit and Yield Point. Ductile strains. Ultimate strength. 
Measure of ductility. Effect of shape of test pieces. Resilience. Effect 
of overstrain on Elastic limit. Hardening and annealing. Compression 
test. Live loads. Resistance to shock. Fluctuating stresses. Fatigue 
and effect of dynamic loading. Factor of safety. Combined stresses. 
Hardness tests. 



HEAT ENGINES. 

One lecture a week throughout the session. 

Elementary Thermodynamics. Work done by an expanding fluid. 
Adiabatic and isothermal expansion and compression. Entropy. 
Air compressors and motors. 
Ideal Heat engines. Thermal Efficiency. 
Carnot constant volume and constant pressure cycles. 
Conlbugtion. Evaporation. Laws of heat transmission. 



118' SYLLABUS. 

Station boilers. Gas producers, 

Steam engines, Action of steam in cylinder. Effect of initial pressure 
and expansion on economy. Governing. Steam jacketing and super- 
heating. 

Internal Combustion Engines Principles of working. Effect of 
compression, Strength of mixture, speed, point of ignition. Description 
of gas and oil engines. 

Refrigerating Machinery. Principles of working. Choice of 
working substance. Comparison of results from different machines. 

(3rd Year). 

One lecture per week for first half session. 

Flow of steam through orifices and nozzles. Impact of steam on vanes* 

Classification of steam turbines. Determination of vane angles. 

Steam consumption. Effect of vacuum, super-heat, initial pressure. 

Governing of steam turbines. 

Hydraulic Machinery Revision of Hydraulics and Hydrostatics. 
Impact of water on fixed and moving vanes, Turbines Impulse and 
Reaction. Description of different types of turbines. Determination of 
vane angles. Efficiencies of turbine plant. Governing. 

Pumps Reciprocating Centrifugal and Turbine. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN. 

(1st and 2nd Years). 

An Elementary course in Engineering Design. 

Design of bolts, cotters, riveted joints. Shafting, coupling and bearings. 
Pulleys, Spur and Bevel gearing. Profiles of teeth, Cam profiles. 

ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

Two hours per week throughout (2nd year and 1st term of 3rd year)* 

Material Testing Tests to destruction of specimens of cast-iron, 
wrought iron, ateel and various alloys in tension, compression^ befcdhig 
and torsion. Elastic tests of various materials. Microscopic examination 
of metals Effect of heat treatment. Riveted joints. Shafts and 
couplings. Tests of cements, concrete bricks, and stones. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 119 

Thenno-Dynamic Laboratory- Determinaton of latent heat of 
steam. Calorific values of liquid, solid, and gaseous fuels. Use of Indi- 
cator. Tests of steam and internal combustion engines, steam turbine*, 
boilers and condensers. Gas analysis. 

Hydraulic Laboratory Flow of water through orifices and nozzles. 
Flow over weirs. Flow through pipes. Effect of bends, elbows, changes 
of section of pipe. 

Testing of turbines and centrifugal pumps. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(2nd Tear). 

Two lectures and two practical periods, each week throughout the 
second year. 

General. Electric and Magnetic Circuits, conductivity and insulation 
of materials : measuring instruments : direct current : principle of alter- 
nating currents in single, two and three phase circuits. 

Dynamo Electric Machinery Description ; principles ; working 
and maintenance ; characteristics of D. G. and A. G. generators and 
motors including parallel working. The course will deal with : 

(a). Series, shunt and compound-wound D. C. generators : preven- 
tion of sparking : voltage regulation and the use of inter 
poles. 
(b). Series and shunt wound D. G. motors : their starting, speed 

control and efficiency. 

(c). Single and three-phase A. G. generators ; parallel working. 
(G?). Induction, synchronous and slip-ring motors: methods of 
starting, working and characteristics. 

(3rd Year). 

Two lectures a week and three lectures a week after Civil Engineering 
project. 

General. The course treats of the transmission and distribution of 
electrical energy and the following points will be considered in detail : 
(a) transmission of energy : high and low tension systems : advant- 
ages of the 8-phase system : voltage drop, and power factor : 
posts and insulators, and erection of mains : underground a4 
overhead systems contrasted. 



120 SYLLABUS. 

(6) distribution of electrical energy: arrangement for a public 

supply and the use of feeders. 

(c) transformers : construction, action, working and efficiency : rotary 

converters and motor generators. 

(d) rectification : mercury and valve rectifiers. 

(e) switch gear as applied in modern power stations : protection, 

boosters, balancers and accumulators. 

(/) lighting : systems of wiring accessories distribution, and fuse 
boards : 'wiring circuits : wiring rules : incandescent lamp and 
heating appliances : estimating : a small project will be 
included in the course. 



Note. A comprehensive course of practical work will be undertaken during the 
laboratory periods. 



OVBRSEBK CLASS. 



COURSE OF STUDY AND SYLLABUS. 



OVERSEER CLASS, 1929-30. 



*THE chief points kept in view in arranging this Course of Study are 
to ensure the necessity for steady work throughout the whole course, 
and to co-ordinate the instruction given in each subject so as to lead 
up to a thorough test of the qualifications necessary for a Subordinate 
Engineer in the Public Works Department of as high a grade as a 
College training can produce ; special attention being paid to the local 
conditions of India. This test is represented by the Project and the 
Final Examinations. 50| marks gained in the first year are carried 
on to the second year, so that continuous steady work is necessary for 
ultimate success. 

Terms and Examinations. 

FIRST TEEM 

College Attendances From October 16th to a variable date in 
February. 

Examinations Start on the 1st or 2nd Monday in February, 

whichever falls nearest to the 7th of 

February. 
SECOND TBBM 
College Attendances Start on the Monday following the half 

Sessional Examinations and continue till 

about June 10th. 

Project 1st May to about 3rd or 4th of June. 

Revision in quarters About June 10th to about June 17th. 
Examinations About June 18th. 

ATTENDANCES These are shown in the Time-Tables on pages 

126 and 127. 



ItS COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Course of Study extends over two years, and comprises the 
following subjects grouped under seven heads, to which the following 
nntwrical values are assigned: 

Marks. 

Group I Civil Engineering ... ... 1,600 

II Pure and Applied Mathematics ... 750 

III Surveying ... ... 550 

IV Drawing ... ... 375 

V Mechanical Engineeing ... 375 

VI General,.. ... 350 

VII Project ... ... ... 300 

VIII Physique ... ... 400 

Total ... 4,700 

The marks required at the end of the second year for certificates are 
as follows : 

I.~ To obtain the Higher Certificate as Overseer the minimum 
pass marks of 50 per cent, in each group and 60 per cent. 
in the total must be earned. 

lI.*To obtain an ordinary Certificate (required for all Overseers) 
the minimum pass marks of 38 per cent, in each group 
and 50 per cent, in the total must be earned. 
To qualify for return to the College at the end of the first year 
students are required to obtain 33 per cent, of the marks allotted to 
each group and 50 per cent, of the total marks. 

A Student failing to obtain this standard will not be allowed to 
return to the College unless his failure was due to prolonged absence 
through sickness, or other circumstances beyond his control, in which 
cased the sanction of Government will be required for his re-admission 
contingent on the recommendation of the Principal. 

Photography is a voluntary subject, and the marks obtained in this 
subject do not count in the total. 

The Examinations, the marks assigned to them, and the Time-Tables 
art shown on the following pages. 



OVBR8XBR CLASS. 



EXAMINATIONS AND MARKS. 

(1st Year). 



THEORETICAL. 



Itt Term. 

Subjects. Marks. 

1. Building Materials ... 100 

2. Carpentry ... 100 

3. Earthwork ... 100 

4. Trigonometry & Geometry 100 

5. Mensuration ... 100 

6. Mechanics ... 100 



600 



Marks. 



100 



100 



2nd Term. 
Subjects. 

1 . Building Materials, 

Earthwork and 
Carpentry 

2. Masonry and Building ' 

Construction 

3. Elementary Mathematics 100| 

4. Mechanics ... 100 
5 t Surveying ... 100 

6. Drawing ... 100 

7. Physical Science ... 100 

8. Mechanical Engineering 100 



800 



PRACTICAL AND CLASS WORK. 



1. 
2. 



Mathematics, Tutorial * 
Levels in the Field 



100 
100 



200 

loo 

TOTALS. 



1. Engineering Note-books 100 

2. Mechanics Tutorial * ... 100 

3. Surveys in Field ... 100 

4. Drawing Course ... 250 

5. Workshops ... 50 

loo 

1400 



1st Term 
2nd Term 



Marks. 

800 

... 1400 

Grand Total ... 2200 
Carried forward 50^ ... 1100 



* Fortnightly Submission* 
f Tkif will includt Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Trigontmetry and 



114 



OOVMB Of !TODY. 





HXAMINATl 

1st Term. 


IONS AND MARKS. 

(2nd Tear). 
THEORETICAL. 
2nd Term. 


Subjects. 


Marks. 


Subjects. 


Marks. 


1, 


Roads 


100 


1. 


Building Construction 


100 


2. 


Bridges ... 


100 


2. 


Bridges 


100 


3. 


Estimating 


100 


3. 


Railways 


100 


4. 


Accounts 


100 


4. 


Irrigation ... 


100 


5. 


Mechanics and Hydro- ) 
statics f 


100 


5. 


Sanitarv Engineering ) 
and Water Supply ) 


100 


6, 


Applied Mechanics 


100 


6. 


Estimating 


100 


7. 


Elementary Electrical ) 
Engineering ) 


100 


7. 
8. 


Process Work 
Applied Mechanics ... 


50 
100 


8. 


Mechanical Engineering 


I'do 


9. 


Surveying I. 


100 








10. 


Surveying II. 


100 








11. 


Drawing 


100 








12. 


Mechanical Engineering 


100 






800 






1150 


PRACTICAL AND CLASS WORK. 


1. 


Field Engineering 


100 


1. 


Engineering Note-books 


100 


2. 


Applied Mechanics ? 
Tutorial ) 


100 


2. 
3. 


Drawing Course 
Process Work 


100 
50 


3. 


Survey Course 



200 


4. 


Civil Engineering \ 
Design j 


200 








5. 


Workshops 


100 








6. 


Project 


300 








7. 


General Fitness 


400 






loo 






1250 






1200 






3400 






TOTALS. 







1st Term 
Term 



Matki. 
... 1200 
... 2400 

3600 

Add First Year's Marks 1100 



Grand Total 



4700 



OVBBBBER OLAS8. 186 

GROUP VII. 

The Project will consist of two or more exercises in Civil Engineering 
Design and Field work. 

The total number of marks is 300. 

GROUP VIII. 

The sub-heads and marks allotted to Group VIII Physique and General 
Fitness are : 
Physical Drill -Members of the A. F. I. are not required to pass 

in Physical Drill and are marked for drill, shooting, etc. ... 100 
Athletics Proficiency in games and sports. ... 150* 

General Fitness Physical and mora) fitness for work in the 

engineering profession ... ... ... 150 

Total ... 400 

* Athletics will be marked for Football, Hockey, Tennis and Athletic Sports 
and such marks will be awarded by officers in charge of these games. Any three 
will carry the 150 marks, 



IlME-tABLE. 



TIME-TABLE, 



12* 



000H8S OF STttDT. 



(0 



08 

H 
^ 

n 



W 



Jno H 



^ x, >> * >^ 



Hi 

If) t/5 l/> 



v fr 

I i 

I/) C/) 



8 

"5 ts 

: g w 



be 
. . 

^ 5 g 1 

S S Q a 



8 

*{ 
& w 

c -3 
W g 
:= 

u 






to 



S W . 

1 1 g 

s o Q a 



i W 










g w ' .g .S 

in: 

> 

2 u 



2 g 
DO 



{ 1 tf 

| w 1 1 

* 1 e e 

a o 



w w 

11 

u u 



~ 

> rt rt 

Q a 



-B -8 

O O 



*,.& 

1 I ! 

'i * | 
w w S 



11 

Q Q 



fr fr 8- 



1 1 1 

w 



S s i 1 1 

/) w to tn W 



1: 



o bo 
se 

S w 



bfi 



S G u 



bo bo 
c c 

w w 

_ , 
*> *> 

00 



in co w 





5S 56 



< < 



t t t C t 

S S 3 

in co co to t/3 



s 



: DO 

* 



Q Q 



1 



OVKRRBRR OLA88. 



129 





f 


j* ** : 

g 1 -g "5 

S I S 22 

(/. c/) c/) Q Q 


bO 00 

.112 22 
U U Q Q Q 






to. 


bo : b* ba : 

^ K B C C ' 

S S 'S '* ** 

i 2 22 

C/) i/) Q Q Q 


ba bo & M 
S 1 1 : 1 I f 

Q . Q . Q . 'Ill 
HUM g g g 

u u u ^ > ii 


1 





S -S e : c ^ : 

g g W ' Cd M 

S S G U U 


bo : bo bo : 

x K 2 ' = S 

S 8 E * i 

S S 2 22 
c/3 (/) Q Q Q 




i 


Wednesday. 


. i 

1 1 : ff S 1 ': 

1 S 3 11 

d cd o S S 

s s s on 


g " "o 

^ ^ 
111 '11 ' 

m m CXi Cu CX. 

w w < < < 




Tuesday. 


S 
.s 

bO *o 

5 j? 22 
S U Q- Q Q 


III It 

> : Q : 
Q Q Q *g (g ' 

w w w u .-= 

CJ U U <* O 




a 


. bo bb M 

** tU hn du cu o< 
efl P 2P 2 O O O 

i s ||| 

I f T S S S 
S 5 >> ^ 


bO gj bO ^ ^ 

& a So . c 

"> w *> *5 "5 

U S U Cd W 


*J 


IIOH 


OV O ** W M N C*> 

' M NN M ' 

00 i ci c^ 
O\ O <-* M 


O\ O **4 C) p< C4 f) 








>* 

5 


| 
1 



f 



OVEK8EEK CLASS. 



SYLLABUS. 



GROUP I -CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Building Materials. 

(1st Year). 

Stone. Selection. Characteristics. Classification and appearance. 
Position in quarry. Composition and stratification. Table of useful 
Indian stones and the purposes for which they are best qualified. 
Preservation. Artificial stones. Arrangements for quarrying. Blast- 
ing. Implements used. Line of least resistance. Size and position of 
charges. Fuze. Large blast. Method of boring and firing blast holes. 
Dressing stones. 

Un'c/'s. Classification and names of various bricks and their quali- 
ties. Tests for bricks. Brick -earth. Qualities to be sought for. 
" Reh " in bricks. Preparation of clay for bricks. Sizes of bricks. 
Moulding. Hand moulding, slop moulding, sand moulding, ground 
moulding, block moulding. Economy in moulds. Rate of moulding. 
Arrangement of workmen for moulding. Drying Stacking. Burn- 
ing bricks Clamps. Time of burning. Pazawahs. Kilns of various 
sorts. Their comparative advantages. General principles of burning. 
Rates. Bull's kiln. Fire bricks. 

Tiles. Selection and preparation of clay. Methods of making e.g., 
tetter's wheel, Squirting and Moulding. Burning, Arrangement in 
kilns. Allahabad tiles. Mangalore tiles. Glazed tiles. Glass tilea. 

Cements Limes, Mortars. Use of mortar. Varieties of lime. 
Properties of limestone. Burning. Clamps. Kilns. Natural and 
artificial cements. Portland cement. Classification of limes. Testing 
strength of mortar. Asphalte. Whitewash. Blaster, Lime concrete. 
Cement concrete. 



188 SYLLABUS OF THE COURSE OP STUDY. 



of trees. Felling trees. Seasoning* Decay* 
Classification. Indian timber in general use, its durability and location, 
and suitability for different purposes. 

Metals. Metals used in engineering. Their appearance and pro- 
perties. Iron ores. Principles of smelting. Oast-iron. Wrought- 
iron. Steel. Impurities and their effects. Casting. Puddling. 
Refining. Annealing. Welding. Tempering. Protection against 
corrosion. Other metals. Alloys. 

Miscellaneous. Paint. Bases. Vehicles. Solvents. Driers. 
Pigments. Varnish. Wood-oiling. Glass. Putty. Glue. Size. 
Coal Tar. Creosote. Pitch. 

Students will make themselves familiar with the appearance of various sorts of 
materials, e.g., stone, brick, etc., so that they may be able to classify them at sight. 
Students will be shown practically how to class bricks, rough test for quality of 
lime, surkhi, cement, mortar, etc. 

Laboratory worfc. Simple tests of cement, lime, mortars, etc. 

Carpentry. 

(1st Year). 

Definition of carpenter's, joiner's and cabinet-maker's work. 
Method of measuring each class of work. Joints and angle joints. 
Principles in making joints. Flat roofs. Floors. Built beams. 
Trussed beams. Protection of timber. Frames. Roof-trusses. 
Timber partitions. Staircases. Doors and windows. Centering. 
Staging. Examples. 

Masonry. 

(1st Year). 

Plant and Scaffolding. Plmt. Machinery. Instruments used in 
building. Scaffolding. 

Stone Masonry. Classification. General principles and precau- 
tions. Method of building. Ashlar masonry. Bond. Different 
kinds of masonry. Methods of strengthening joints. Dowels. 
Joggles. Cramps. Dressing of stones. Lewis, Bolls machinery for 
lifting stones, 



OVERSEER CLA88. 188 

Brick Masonry* Bricks. General principles and precautions. 
Settlement. Bond. Racking back. Hollow walls* Reinforced 
brickwork. Burnt and sundried bricks in mud mortar. Mud walls. 
Pise walls. 

Archwork. Arches. Arch forms. Inverts. Jack arches. Piers 
for arches. Vaulting. Underground arches, tunnels, culverts. Sett- 
ing out. Thickness of arches. Centering. Bond of stone and brick 
arches. Skew arches. Ribbed skew arches. 

Foundations and wells. Foundations. Nature of sub-soils. Soil 
for foundations. Foundations in different localities. Piles and pile- 
drivers. Wells and well foundations. Excavating apparatus. Well 
curbs. Foundations in water. 

Types and Construction of retaining walls. Depth of foundations. 
Precautions against water. Counterforts. Revetments. Breast walls. 
Dry stone retaining walls. General types of masonry dams. 

Concrete. Different kinds. Mortar used. Ballast. Sand. Pro- 
portions of ingredients. Mixing. Laying and ramming. Thickness 
of layers. Volume. Rubble concrete. Forms for concrete. Laying 
concrete under water. Waterproofing, Methods of finishing surfaces. 
Elementary reinforced concrete. Correct positions for stopping rein- 
forced work. 

Pointing and Planter. Details, Varieties. Polished cement floors. 

Appendices,-^ Notes and specifications on different varieties of 
masonry work. 

Earthwork. 

(1st Year). 

General notes. Definitions. Contracts. Stability and angle of 
repose. Properties of clay. Stratified soils. Preservation of ma- 
terials obtained in excavation. Hints on management. 

Measurement and Setting-out. Side widths and slopes. 

Tools and execution of work. Tools and Machinery used. Tools 
for rock excavation. Supply of tools, 

Cuttings. Economical depth. Horse run. Stages. 

Embanking and puddling. Embankments. Settlement. Slopes, 
Protection. Drainage. Puddling. Puddle cores. Sections. 

M ai ntenance. Slips. Drainage and protection of slopes 



14 SYLLABUS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY, 

JSfirthwork for Canal Distributaries. Object and general design, 
pconomical depth of cutting. Alignment across high ground. Inner 
slopes. Cioss sections. Special banks. Recessing of banks. Puddle 
liniugs. Laying out. Land demarcation. Borrow pits. Operations. 
Bench marks. Profiles. Excavation. Temporary land. Earthwork 
near masonry works. Method of consolidation. Grassing banks, 
grazing. Repair works. 

Appendices. Notes and specifications. 



Building Construction. 

(1st Tear). 

Site and design. Selection of Site. Design of^buildings. 

Foundations. Suitability of soils. Benching out. Preparation of 
bed.' Widths for different pressures. Earth filling. 

Walls. Plinth. Tbickness. Walls in mud mortar. Strutting. 
Buttresses and pilasters. Bond. Scaffolding, bhoring, Underpin- 
ning. Chimneys. Arches. Openings for doors and windows. Wall 
plates. Recesses for ends of beams. Wooden bricks, plugs and iron 
hold-fasts. Hollow walls. Partitions. Damp proof courses. Plaster 
and pointing. Different parts of walls. Columns and piers. 

Staircases. Types. Positions. Width of tread and height of rise. 
Width and headway of staircase. Stairs of different materials. Spiral 
stairs. Balustrades and hand rails. 

Floors and ceilings. Types of floors. Preparation of bed. Floojrs 
of different materials. Jack arch floor. Patent fireproof floors. 
Damp proof floors. Protection from white ants. Ceilings. 

fioofs. Types of roofs aud their supports. Roofs of different 
materials. Iron roof supports. Iron trusses. Verandah roofs. 
Yaults and domes. Roof gutters and spouts. Patent roofing. 

Fittings and decorations. Types of fittings. Skylights and 
lanterns. Shelves and hanging fixtures. Punkhas. Lightning con- 
ductors. Different kinds of Decorations. Painting. Vainish* 
Distemper. Paper hanging. Dados and skirtings. 

Hea^ng, cooling and ventilation. Object of heating. Open fires 
a^d stoves. Main objects of ventilation. Quantity of air lequired. 
Points for successful ventilation. Different systems of v 
Natural ventilation. Plenum system and cooling of rooms. 



OVERSEER CLASS. 



135 



Reinforced concrete construction. Simple calculation relating to the 
design of simple columns, beam slab and T beams. 



Roads. 

(1st and 2nd Year). 

Introductory general principles. Roads, why made. Paths. Limit- 
ing grade. Direction. Deviations. Towns near line. Obligatory 
points. Ravine crossing. Widths. 

Contours and gradients. -Contours. Scale of slopes. Gradients. 
Minimum and ruling gradients. Considerations for fixing maximum 
gradient for any given surface. Maximum gradient in the plains and 
hills. 

Curves and Culverts. Curves. Increased width at Curves. Super- 
elevation. Curves at railway crossings. Culverts. Culyert approaches. 

Section of a metalled road in the plains. Land. Bank. Metalling. 
Shape of profile. Side slope. Platforms for repair metal. Railings, 
Furlong, mile, and boundary stonus. Trees. Crossings. Shelter. 

Survey, Design and Estimate for a metalled road in flat country. 
Cross section. Traverse. Survey. Drawings. Formation line. 
Estimate. Lining-out. Construction. 

Kankar collection and consolidation. Kankar. Quarries. Rates. 
Stacks. Collection. Size. Consolidation. Scarifying. Spreading. 
Ramming. Lights. Patries. Ruts. Cost. 

Stone collection and consolidation. Stone. Size. Cost. Stone 
crushers. Tests. Consolidation. Binding. Water. Scarifying. 
Dry rolling. Lights, etc. Steam rollers. Foundations and spread- 
ing. Consolidating, iron rollers. 

Road Maintenance. Gang. Order book. Patching. Ruts. Duties 
of gang. Repairs. Bridge inspections. Registers. Depths of 
metal. Quantity of metal required. 

Arboriculture. Scheme. Useful trees. Nurseries. Planting out. 
Guards. Watering. Tending, Lopping. 

Earth roads. Temporary roads. Bridle roads. Drainage. Grades. 
Split log drag. Repairs. Temporary roads. Sand. Marshy land. 
Hill roads. Cliff gallery. Bridle roads. Cross section. Drains. 
Parapets, Bridges and scuppers. Repairs. 



SYLLABUS OF THfi OOtttSE OF STUDY. 



producers. Watering. Sea-Water. Des- 
criptions of different materials used for dust prevention. 

Streets, carriageways, gutters, sidewalks. Streets. Widths. Ma- 
terials. Grown. Granite sets. Wood blocks. Bricks. Ideal pave- 
raent. Gutters. Sidewalks. Gullies. 

Hill Roads. Vertical and horizontal systems. Road trace. 
Starting survey. Method for narrow roads. Areas of catting. 
Retaining and breast walls. Inward and outward slope. Section 
with a crown. Width. Gutters. Scuppers. Drainage. Lining 
oat. Measuring work. Maintenance. 

Appendices, , 



Railways. 

(2nd Year). 

Introduction. L*nd. Earthwork. Road and Level crossings. 
Fencing. Types of Bridges. Grades and ruling gradients. 

Permanent way and Ballast. Permanent way. Bull-head and 
Fiat-footed mils. Method of fixing rails to sleepers. Requirements 
of permanent way. Fish-plates and joints. Chairs and other sup- 
ports. Fastenings. Wooden sleepers. Sleepering of girder bridges. 
Metal sleepers. Ballast. Functions of ballast. Materials used for 
ballast. Minimum depth of ballast Packing and boxing. 

Points and Cr0Mm$r."Set8 of points or switches and what they 
consist of. Stud-bolts. Clearance. " Throw " of tongues. Points, 
how worked. Crossings. "V"arid Diamond crossings. Arrange- 
ment of wing-rails. Facing and trailing points. Minimum lengths 
of switch permitted. Turn-outs. Nose of crossing. Simpering of 
turn-out Crossover road. Following points. 

Station Works and requirements. ~~T&$&6nii*l features of all stations. 
ftesenger station buildings. Passenger platforms. Goods platforms 
Sidings. 

Definitions of Station Machinery including.- Engine sheds. Turn- 
taUef), Triangles. Water columns, ash pita and fuel-stages. 
Carriage examining pits. Signals. Signal mechanism. Point 
indicators. Buffer stops. Scotch blocks. 



CLASS. 1S7 

Plate-laying. Laying out on prepared formation. Details of distri- 
bution of labour at rail-head. Method of linking in. Operation of 
fish-platipg. Packing gangs. Curves. , Jim crow. 

Superelevation and the formula for #. 

Elementary description of Signals and their ufes including Inter- 
locking. 

Maintenance of Railways. Permanent way maintenance. Creep. 
Wear of rails. Check rails. Renewals of rails and sleepers. 



Bridges. 

(2nd Year). 

Introduction. Various types of bridges. 

Site, Waterway and Design. General remarks regarding sites. 

Temporary Bridges. Causeways. Types of Trestles, Trestles bridges. 
Superstructure of roadway, General description and uses of the 
following bridges, vie . Pile bj:i4gjB9. Bridges on crate piers. Wooden 
truss bridges. Cantilever bridges. Suspension bridges. Floating 
bridges. Types of rope and cordage. Anchorages. 

Foundations, piers and abutments. Ordinary 
dry ground. Foundations in soil charged with water, 
for building foundations under water. Well foundations. Sjteel 
Caissons. Use of compressed air. Hollow iron and screw pile 

" ' -N II f* ^*<'.*T 

foundations. Piles and pile driving. Loads on fpundajtipns. 
Piers, abutments antjl wing walls. 

Arched bridges of masonry, brick-work and concrete. Shape of 
arches. Bond of brick and masonry arches. Centerings. Thick- 
ness of arches. Concrete arches. Abutments. Spandrels. 

* :-ii . - ffM*lt<*i3. 

Blocking course. Parapets. Roadway. Architectural features. 
Loads. Arched bridges of large spans. 

Reinforced Concrete Bridges. General remarks. Systems of 
reinforcement and materials used. Forms of Bridges for whi^h used. 
Centerings and false work. 

Iron and Steel Bridges. Materials of construction. TyjHjs of bridges. 
Roadway. Girder bearings. Erection of girders. Testing girders 
after erection. Revets and Riveting. 




13$ SYLLATttJS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

Field Engineering, 

(2nd Year). 

(i). Use of Spars. Various knots and lashings and the suit- 
ability of each to certain circumstances. Coiling and 
handling of ropes. Blocks and tackle. Reeving of 
blocks. Use of handspikes and rollers. Hold-fasts. 
Guys. Use and construction of derricks, shears, gyns, 
and trestles in placing girders or columns in position in 
building or for other similar work. 

(ii). Ground- Tracing. General principles (Masonry Manual). 
Working plans for foundations on level ground and on 
slopes, 

Trenches with vertical and with sloping sides. Lay- 
ing out buildings on the ground and similar practical 
instruction. 



Estimating 

(2nd Year). 

Definitions, 

Rules out taking on quantities in a road, house, bridge, canal, 

Rules for deductions. 

Rules for taking on quantities of roofing, flooring, wood-work, 
iron- work, doors, windows and arches. 

Calculation of probable quantities of each kind of material re- 
quired to be furnished for the completion of a work. 

Calculation of rates. 

Taking out quantities and framing estimates from working 
drawings of the following examples : 

1 . A house. 

2. A masonry culvert or bridge, 

3. A very small steel bridge. 

4. Iron roof on steel trusses. 

5. A reinforced concrete structure, 

6. Portion of a road in cutting and embankment. 

7. Earthwork of a canal. 

Use of Tables for the area of side slopes, 



OVERSKKH OLA&S, 189 

Notes on Works. 

(1st and 2nd Years). 

Each student will keep a Note-book and record in it descriptions and 
sketches of any materials, manufactures, or works, veiled by him, 

Advantage will be taken of every work of repair or construction under 
execution in or near Roorkee, by careful inspection, both under the ins- 
truction of a master and independently. Full notes and sketches are 
to be recorded by students in their Note-books, which are to contain no 
transcripts from their Text-books. The date of each visit to a work 
should invariably be recorded at the head of the notes adverting to the 
same. 

These Note-books wilLbe inspected once a month, and marks will bo 
allotted at the end of each Term. 



Irrigation 

(Part I. only). 
(2nd Year). 

Introduction Definition. Importance of Irrigation. Functions. 
Improvement of crops. 

Well Irrigation. Source of supply of well water. Sub-soil reservoir. 
Sub-soil water levels. Gone of percolation. Movement of sub-soil water. 
Qnantity of water available. The Mota, Use of Mota. Entry of 
water to a well. Artificial mota. Drainage cones. Classes of wells. 
Sinking wells. Depth of sinking. Masonry percolation wells. Methods 
of raising water from wells in ordinary use. Area protected by wells. 

Channels. Definition of duty. Depth of water. Fixing the re- 
quired discharge. Longitudinal section. Velocities suitable to ordinary 
soils. Silt deposits. Bed slopes for main canals. Distinction between 
Canal Distributary and Minor. Dimensions of channels. Position of 
bed line on distributaries. Cross section of distributary. Disposition 
of spoil banks. Brief notes on high embankments (para. 34). Approxi- 
mate losses by percolation and evaporation. (Use of discharge tables 
and charts). Tatils and Colabas. 



140 SYLLABUS OF THE COtTBflK OF STUDY, 

Head Works Points to be observed W selecting sites for head 
works. Main weirs. Brief description of three types, i.e,, Narora, 
Okhla and Paricha. Height of weirs. Afflux. Drop shutters, ne- 
cessity for. Length of weirs. Tendencies of weirs to faiJ. Foundations 
of weirs, description of. Instances of failure of weirs. Under- slices, 
necessity for. Under-sluices brief description of. Object and descrip- 
tion of groynes below weirs. Various systems of lifting sluices. Talus 
below weirs, object and description of. Afflux embankments. Canal 
Head Regulators, brief description of. Temporary bunds. 

Drainage Crossings. Depth of canal fixing the method to be used 
for drainage crossings, z;^.:~- (i) Superpassage, (ii) Level Grossing, 
(iii) Aqueduct, (iv) Inlet. Brief description of above works as typified 
by (a) Pathri, (b) Dhanii,uri and (c) Splani Aqugdjact. 

Works. Regulators, brief description. Falls, object of and descrip- 
tion of type fall. Object of a raised crest. Brief description and 
object of a notched fall. Rapids. Bed bars. Escapes. Bridges, 
types of and description. Mills. Plantations. Water courses. 
Outlets, Earthwork in distributaries, Puddling banks. Consoli- 
dating banks. 

Drainage Works. Importance of draining and irrigated area. Silt 
tanks. 

Training Works. Object of. Dead water. Straightening chan- 
nels. Temporary training works. Methods of influencing current. 



Sanitary Engineering 

PART I. WATER-SUPPLY. 
(2nd Year). 



and source of suflPty* -Variations. Ayerage ann 
Losses by absorption and evaporation. Available r^nfall. 
of iuppJy. Testing quality of water. 

Gravitation supply. Drainage area. Size of reserfoif. Bfesfi 
for a dam. Types of dams. Subsidiary works. CJutlets aijfi 
towers. Aqueducts. Pipe crossings. Hydraulic gradient. 
pressure or balancing reservoirs. 



OVKUBEER OLA 88, 141 

. liitaftes and unfiltered water pumping 
stations. Filtered water stations. Tests. Rising mains. 

Water-supply frWn weffi8.~ Types of wells. Shallow and deep 
wells. Driven tube wells in soft soil. Varieties of tube wells. 
Tests of yield of wells. 

Purification.' Mineral and organic impurities. Impurities from 
different sources. Settling tanks. Filters. Clear water reser- 
voirs. Methods o$ Sterilization. 

fWsiribution. Intermittent and continuous systems. Service 
regefrvolre. Distribution Pipes. Pipe fittings. House connec- 
tions. Pressure. Alignment of mains and sub-mains. Method 
of calculating sizes of pipes. 

Meters and waste preventions. 



Sanitary Engineering. 

PART!!. 
(2nd Yw). 

Systems of collection and removal oj rejust. 8ttc of sanitation in 
India. Systems of removal of refuse. Conservancy. 

Sewers and under groud drains. Alignment. Separate system. 
Materials used in construction. Fall and velocity. Flushing. Catch 
pits and gullies. Manholes C tearing obstructions. Ventilation. 
Sub-soil drainage. Storm overflows. 

Surface drains. Alignment. Sections. Provision for rain water. 
Flushing and cleaning. Junctions. Road crossings. 

House drainage. Water closets. Flushing, Soil pipi s. Urinals. 
Sinks. Baths. Lavatories. House drains. Indian adaptations. 
Connection with sewers. Privies and water closets for Indians. Pail 
Depots. 

Public conveniences. Dry pattern latrines. Water flushed latrines. 
Trough Itttrmes. Urinals. Underground conVenieiictfHfl '^ 

Sewage disposal. Selection of site tor outfall. PlftfSfcation by 
(tf)'huid irrigation, (ft) interaiitU'nt fctnd fi Iteration, (c / ^jlKr' tank, (d) 
contact beds. Continuous trickling filters. Tests o purification. 



142 SYLLABUS Oft ?Hfc COUtiSM, OF STUDY. 

GROUP II.-PURE AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 
Elementary Mathematics. 



Year). 
Geometry. 

Students will be expected to be familiar with th^ subject matter of 
Hall and Stevens School Geometry, Parts I. V. Students will also be 
expected to solve simple riders and to apply the propositions practically 
in the solution of easy graphical problems requiring geometrical drawing. 

Trigonometry. 

Angles and their measurements ; Trigonometrical ratios. The relation 
between th e ratios of complementary and supplementary angles. General 
properties of ratios including simple cases of multiple and sub-multiple 
angles. Simple identities and equations. Elementary properties of 
triangles. Use of logarithms and trigonometrical tables. Application 
to the solution of triangles and simple problems relating to heights and 
distances. Relation between the circular measures and trigonometrical 
ratios. 

Note. - Slide role will be used as far as possible. 



Mensuration. 

Lengths of chords and area of a circle. Areas of plane rectilineal 
figures ; and of segments and sectors of circles. Application of formula?, 
for surface and volumes of cones, frustum of cones, spheres, zones of 
spheres, pyramids, prisms and cylinders. Use of the planimeter. Special 
stress will be laid on abridged methods of calculation. 



Elementary Mechanics. 

(a). Cojpoeption of force. Stress and strain. Gravitational units of 
Elementary laws relating to concurrent forces. Para- 
icn and triangle of forces. Larni's theorem. Parallel 
force*. Force mid funicular polygons. Moments. Elementary 




OVERSEER CLASS. 148 

conditions of equilibrium. Centres of gravity in some simple 
cases. Principle of work, Simple machines, namely, lever, 
inclined plane, screw, pulleys, wheel and differential pulley ; 
velocity ratio, mechanical advantage and efficiency. 

(2nd Year). 

(b). Laws of motion. Absolute unit of force. Simple examples 
on rectilinear motion including the princif ICB of energy and 
momentum. 



Elementary Applied Mechanics. 

Behaviour of elastic bodies under stress. Elastic limit and ultimate 
strength. Young'* modulus, factor of safety. Calculation of cross 
sectional areas of a tie rod. Application of Gordon's formula to find 
safe stress in a compression member. Graphical determination of stresses 
in simple roof frames including the effect of wind pressure. Simple 
cases of bending moment and shearing force diagrams for cantilevers 
and simply supported beams. Moments or resistance of rectangular 
beams The manner in which the bending moment is resisted and the 
flange stresses in I beams. Neutral axis and its location. Design of 
wooden beams by the method of rupture. 

Stiffness of beams and its calculation from the deflection formulas 
for simple cantilevers and beams under (1) a distributed load and v'2) 
a single concentrated load, Graphic testing of retaining walls and 
arches. 



Hydrostatics and Hydraulics, 

Fluid pressure at a point in a mass of liquid at rest, and on a plane 
surface partly or wholly immersed. Intensity of pressure and whole 
pressure. Centre of pressure in simple elementary cases. Atmospheric 
pressure. Barometer, Syphon, Air and water pumps. 

Velocity afflux through orifice?. Fluid friction and application of 
formulas for discharge through pipes and over weirs to practical casts. 



144 SYLLABUS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

GROUP III. Surveying. 



(1st Year). 

Instruments their use and adjustments. Parts of instruments. 
Magnetic compass and variation. Description, use and adjustments 
of Theodolites. Errors in using a Theodolite. Useful hints on the 
Theodolite. The Level. Description, use and adjustments of Levels. 
Choice of an instrument. The Levelling staff. Method of observing 
the staff. 

Levelling. Object of Levelling. Datum. Bench-mark. Theory 
of Levelling. Procedure in Levelling. Level surface and Horizontal 
surface. Curvature and refraction. Different classes of Levelling. 
Levelling Field-books. How to keep the record. Care of instrument, 
Use of boning rods. 

Chain Surveying. The measuring chain Ranging a line. Survey- 
ing by the chain only. The hand sketch. Method of finding 
direction of meridian by the sun's shadow. Station points. Tielines. 
Offsets. The Field-boob. Scale of plan. Method of plotting. A 
chain survey will be done in the field by the class. 

The prismatic Compass. Bearings and angles. Description of Pri- 
smatic compass. Method of using Prismatic compass. The Field 
book. Plotting the surveys. How to adjust a closing error. Filling 
in a survey. Finding one's place in a survey. A chain and compass 
survey will be done in the field by the class. 

(2nd Year). 

Traversing and its computations. Definition of a traverse. Gale's 
Traverse system. Conditions of a closed traverse. Method of the sur- 
veying by Interior angles. The Traverse Table. How to apply correc- 
tions. Method of plotting the traverse. Limit of error in traversing. 
Likely errors in chaining. A traverse with the Theodolite will be 
done in the field by the class. 

Plane-tabling. The plane-table equipment. Sight rule and mag- 
netic compass. Finding one's place. Triangle of error method by 
resection. Plane-tabling methods. Engineering Contouring. After 
doing the traverse as mentioned in the previous para,, the interior detail 
will be filled in by plane-table survey. 



OVERSEER CLABS. 146 

Curves and Alignments. Definitions of properties of a circle. 
Theory of curves. Method of setting out a simple curve with (i) a 
100-feet chain and theodolite ; , ii) by offsets from tangents and 
chords produced ; (iii) by off wets inside the curve. Methods of 
calculation when curves start or end with sub-chords. Problems in 
simple and compound curves. Curve of deviation. 

Engineering Surveying. Engineering project. Preliminary sur- 
veys. Least area of country to be surveyed. Details which will 
be required. Levels. Load in open level country. Hill roads. 
Railway and Canal surveys. Trial levelling and surveying. Drainage 
lines. Bench-marks. Running the traverse. Maps and drawings 
required in an engineering project, for Road, Canal or Railway 
Project. 



GROUP IV -Drawing. 

(1st Year). 

1 Architectural colouring. 

2. Scales and Arches. 

3. Specimen survey plan. 

4. Elementary projection and sections, of solids, 

5. Projection. 

6. Doors and windows. 

7. Railway or road plan section. 

8. Small building with original section, 

9. Railway Culvert with original section, 
10. Bungalow with original section. 

Model drawing. 



(2nd Year). 

1. Building from specification. 

2. Building from measurement. 

3. Elementary perspective. 

4. Drawings of simple models and from memory. 

Note, All Drawing plates mast be done in College daring drawing attendances 
and they mast have the date of commencement and completion, with the student's 
name, and order of standing in his class at the left-hand bottom corner, 

Fancy borders and ornamental printing are strictly forbidden. 



146 SYLLABUS OP THE COURSE OF STUD*. 

GROUP V -MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



Workshops. 

(1st and 2nd Tears). 

The object of the course is to familiarise students with the 
appearance, structure, and properties of materials commonly used 
in engineering and with the tools and processes by which they are 
shaped. 

Carpentry and Pattern making. A series of simple exercises will 
be provided including the preparation of various types of joints used 
in wood work and Elementary Pattern making. 

Foundry. The use and preparation of sand moulds, and the ex- 
planation of Foundry methods. 

Students will be provided with simple patterns and cores from 
which they will prepare moulds and make castings in white metal, etc. 

Forge. Use of tools employed in Forge work. Exercises in 
drawing down, upsetting, welding, etc. Elementary practice in the 
heat treatment of steel. 

Fitting and Machine Shop. Use of hand tools in bench-work. 
Cutting tools and their action. Characteristic features of simple 
machine tools. Simple exercises in soldering and brazing. 



Descriptive Mechanical Engineering. 

(1st Year). 

Fastenings. Screws, Bolts, Nuts, their production and uses, 
Rivets and riveted joints, standard iron and steel sections. 

Boilers. Shell, Water tube and Firetube. Description of the 
more common types, their erection and inspection. Boiler accessories, 
description and uses. Steam pipe lines. Arrangement and Lagging. 

Steam Engines. --Description of the simplest types, including 
Portable Engine. Engine foundations. Erection. 

(2nd Year). 

Internal Combustion Engines, -Description of oil, petrol and Gas 
Engines. Foundations, Location of starting and running faults. 



OVERSEER CLASS. 147 

Hydraulic Machinery. Laying and anchoring of pipe lines. 
Description of Pelton wheel and Francis Turbine. Description 
of common types of reciprocating and Centrifugal pumps and 
Pulsometers. 

Power Transmission. Elementary treatment of power transmission 
by means of belts, gearing, ropes, chain and friction drives. 

Lectures will be illustrated by models, wall diagrams of modern 
machinery and conducted inspections of examples of the above 
machinery in the College Workshops and Laboratories. 



GROUP VI.-GENERAL. 

Elementary Science. 

(]st Yearj. 

The subject is an elementary one and is taken up with special refer- 
ence to the Engineering subjects. The Elementary Physical principles 
taught are illustrated by numerical examples in tutorial work and the 
measurement of principal quantities involved is carried out in the 
Physical Laboratory by students in a simple manner. 

General Measurement. Fundamental units in C.G.S and F.P.8. 
systems. Measurement of length, area and volume. Mass density 
and specific gravity. Buoyancy. Determination of specific gravity 
by simple methods. Atmospheric pressure and Boyle's Law ; Fortin 
and aneroid barometers ; siphon, pressure gauges and water pumps. 

Heat. General effects of heat; mercury thermometer and its gradua- 
tion. Centigrade and Fahrenheit scales of temperature. Expansion 
of solids, liquids and gases with simple applications ; Charle's law. 
Units of heat, specific heat ; its measurement by the method of mix- 
tures ; measurement of specific heat of liquid by the method of cooling. 
Laws of fusion and ebullition, melting and boiling points ; latent heat ; 
evaporation, cold produced by evaporation. Transfer of heat by con- 
due lion, convection and radiation with simple applications of these 
methods. Heat and work, mechanical equivalent of heat. Calorific 
value of coal. Thompson's Fuel Calorimeter. 



148 SYLLABUS OP THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

Light. Rectilinear propagation of light : shadows. Units of illu- 
mination and illuminatory power : Photometers. Laws of reflection 
and refraction : mirrors and lenses. 



Accounts. 

(2nd Tear). 

Explanation of the ordinary terms used in book-keeping as they 
arise during the course. Description and uses of the following: 

Cash hook ; pettey cash and imprest ; invoice or purchases book ; 
stock book ; day or sales book ; bills book. 

Students will work out examples after the necessary explanations 
have been given, 



Elementary Electrical Engineering. 

(2nd Year). 

Production of electricity by friction and induction. Dual nature of 
electricity. Gold leaf electroscope. Seat of statical charge on a con- 
ductor. Action of points. 

Properties of electric current, analogy between the electric current 
and flow of water. 

The electric current, pressure and resistance ; definition of ampere, 
volt, and ohm. Measurement of resistance by the Wheatstone's bridge 
and Walker's apparatus. The magnet and the magnetic field. 

The lightning conductor, parts used in and genera] rules for erection ; 
funct!0n of the lightning conductor. Earth resistance of the conductor 
and method of measuring it. Other test to see that the conductor is 
in good condition. 



OVERSEER GLASS. 149 

House Wiring. Principles laid down by Government in u Specifica- 
tions for internal wiring,'* 

D. G. Power Plants. Lay-out of simple D. C. distribution systems. 
Description and working of simple switchboards. Protection devices 
and knowledge of normal faults in a small power station. Tbe course 
will not include the theory or manufacture of Electrical Machinery, but 
Laboratory demonstrations will be given of every principle dealt with 
in the course , 



Ferrotype. 

(2nd Year). 

Apparatus. General description of materials required, and where 
these may be procured ; approximate estimate of their cost. 

Pressure frame. Description of suitable wood. Selection of plate- 
glass. Preparation of printing pads. Approximate estimate of the 
cost for frame. Trays for washing and developing. Description of 
materials used. 

Working Room. How an ordinary room may be converted to one 
suitable for Ferrotype printing, with fittings necessary for the probable 
extent of work. Rough detailed estimate of the cost. 

Paper. Qualities desirable in paper. Practical test as to suitability 
for work generally. 

Tracings. Tracing cloth and tracing paper. Essential points to be 
observed in the preparation of tracing generally. Suitable ink, and 
how it should be rubbed down and used. Colour washes. 

Chemicals. Chemicals required. Precautions to be observed in 
storing. Practical lessons in simple chemical manipulations, When* 
chemicals may be procured ; details of cost. 



150 SYLLABUS OF THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

Printing. Explanations of the action of light on iron salts. Prac- 
tical illustrations showing the effects brought about by the application 
of re-agents, and the chemical changes which take place in each 
case. 

The Ferro-prnssiate (white lines on a blue ground), and Ferrogalic 
(black lines on a clear ground) printing processes. 

Sensitising, drying and storing paper and cloth. Printing in 
diffused and direct sunlight. Methods of preparing copies without the 
aid of pressure frame. 

Developing, intensifying, reducing, trimming and removal of defects. 
Additions or obliterations, in white, blue or black, of lines, figures 
printing, etc., by chemical or other means. 

Mounting. Preparation of the adhesive mixture. Practial instruc- 
tion in mounting on cloth and boards. 

Practical Course. Independent. A tiacing to be prepared specially 
for reproduction work by each student. Three good clear copies in 
each process from the tracing to be submitted on papers which are 
sensitised, and all the manipulations carried by the student himself, 
and three good copies to be submitted on commercial ready-sensitised 
papers, all other manipulations being carried out by the student. 



GROUP VII.-PROJECT. 



(2nd Year). 

The Project will consist of two or more simple exercises in Civil 
Engineering Design and Field Work (see page 125). 



OVERSEER CLASS. 151 

GROUP VIIL-PHYSIQUB. 
(lit and 2nd Years). 

Physical Drill. Proficiency in games and athletic sports ; Physical 
and moral fitness for work in the engineering profession. (See page 
125). 



COURSE OF RTUI>Y, 168 



COURSE OF STUDY AND SYLLABUS, 



DRAFTSMAN GLASS. 



College attendances. Throughout the year, from 9 A. M. to 12-30 
p. M M and from 1-50 p. M. to 3 P.M., except for one or two short 
periods of leave. 

Length of Course. Usually 3 years, but it may be less in the case 
of specially efficient students, 

Syllabus. 1st year. Italic and Block printing in various styles, 
and copying from printed specimens (same size). 

2nd year. Reduction and enlargement to scale. Finished drawings 
from original maps or diagrams. 

3rd year Drawings from measurement of buildings or sites, with 
full details, and Ferrotype in all its branches. 

A special Instructor is in charge of the Draftsman Class. 

Marks. No marks are given, but the Principal inspects the whole 
work of every student at the end of each College Session and decides 
which students are qualified for promotion to the next year, or for the 
award of a certificate as a Draftsman or Tracer in the case of the 
advanced students. 

General. Most of the students are trained as simple Draftsmen and 
Tracers and not as Computers or Estimators. Those who do not attain 
to the Draftsman standard may obtain certificates as Tracers ; and 
those who, in three years, do not attain to a proper standard may be re- 
quired to prolong their course, or to leave the College without afrcertifi- 
cate. The training of a few selected students in simple estimating 
in their 3rd year has been introduced. Those who pass the annual 
test in Estimating will have an entry on their certificates as "qualified 
in Simple Estimating." 

Ditcipline. For discipline the students come under the ordinary 
College regulations while in the College, 



ANNUAL PRIZE I, 155 

ANNUAL PRIZES. 

^.^.No prize will be awarded when the competition for it ii insufficient 
or for any other adequate reason. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS. 



THE COUNCIL or INDIA PRIZE OF Hi. 1,000. 

To the most distinguished Student who shall obtain the Higher 

Certificate. 



THE THOMASON PHIZE OF Rs. 250. 

To the most distinguished student, who obtains the Higher Certi- 
ficate, but does not gain the Council of India Prize. 



RAI BAHADUK KANHAIYA LAL'S GOLD MEDAL. 
For the most di g tinguished Indian Student of the year who does not 
obtain the Thomason Prize. 



THE THOMASON GOLD MEDAL, AND BOOKS WOHTH Rs. 25/- FROM 1929. 
To the Student of the Civil Engineer Class who shall furnish the bait 
Engineering Designs of the year of a certain minimum excellence. 

THE CAUTLEY GOLD MEDAL. 

To the best Mathematician of the class who shall obtain not less than 
two-thirds of the total marks in Group I. 



CALCOTT-REILLY MEMORIAL GOLD MEDAL. 
For the best passed Student of the Civil Engineer Class in Applied 

Mechanics. 



GENERAL MACLAGAN'S PRIZE. 
For Experimental Science. 



SILVER MEDALS. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING (THEORY). 

SURVEYING. 

DRAWING. 



PHOTOGRAPHY AND FERROTYPE. 

ACCOUNTS. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



LABORATORY WORK. 



SUSHILA AND J. MlTTRA MEMORIAL SlLVER MEDAL FOB THE 

BEST INDIAN STUDENT IN CHEMISTRY. 



14*6 ANNUAL PRIZES. 

OVERSEER GLASS. 



GENERAL MERIT. SILVER MEDAL AND Rs. 100. 



KKAY MEMORIAL PRIZE. SILVER MEDAL AND ABOUT Rs. 18. 
For the best Estimator in the class. 



RAI BAHADUR KANHAitA LAL'S SILVER MEDALS. 
For the two best Indian Students in the class. 



FAIRLEY MEMORIAL SILVER MEDAL. 

For the Student who obtains the highest number of tnarks in 
Applied Mechanics. 



SULLIVAN MEMORIAL SILVER MEDAL FOR MECHANICS. 



SILVER MEDALS. 



HiffiEltATtOS. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING, 
SURVEYING, 



DRAWING. 

PHOTOGRAPHY AND FERROTYPE. 

ACCOUNTS. 



WORKSHOP PRACTICE. 



DRAFTSMAN CLASS. 



GENERAL MERIT, SILVER MEDAL AND Rs. 80. 

2nd Prize Rs. 20. 

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL WORK SILVER MEDAL, 



GENERAL. 

Bmrcowt Bwtfo ChvWtngt 0p for the best Civil Engineer class 
student in the CWtege in work and atWetiee, combined, S<*nd8 



ANKUAL PKIZ18. 157 

Challenge Cup for the best student in the College in games and sports 
combined. Lion Trophy^ a challenge trophy for the best student in 
the College in Athletic Sports, and a Runner-up Challenge Cup for 
the second best student. Vizianagram Gup, a cup presented annually 
from a fund founded by His Highness the Maharajah of Vizianagram, 
to the best Indian student in Athletic Sports in the 3rd year of the 
Civil Engineer Class* There are also numerous challenge cups open 
to all students in the College, or to students in particular classes, for 
tennis, squash racquets, rowing and other recreations (see the Prize 
list at the end of this volume). 



TEXT-BOOKS HBCOHMBNDED. 159 



TEXT BOOKS RECOMMENDED. 



160 TEXT-BOOKS RSCOMMKNDRD. 

TEXT-BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR THE DIFFERENT CLASSES. 



Subject. 



Oivi Engineer Glass- 



Overseer Class. 



Department of Civil Engineering ; for Syllabus, see Group I. 



Building Materials 
Masonry 
Earthwork 
Carpentry 

Field Engineering 

1. Use of Spars 

2. Ground Tracing 
Buildings 



Bridges 

Estimating 

Roads 

Structural Engineering, 

and Theory and Design 

of Structures 



Reinforced Concrete 



Hallways 



Irrigation 



Water-Supply 



Roorkee Manual, Building Materials ... 
Roorkee Manjial, Masonry 
Ditto Earthwork 
Ditto Carpentry 



Manual of Military Engineering 
Koorkee Manual, Masonry 
Ditto Buildings 
Military Works Hand-book 
Molesworth's Pocket Book 

Roorkee Manual, Bridges 

Ditto Estimating 
Ditto Roads 
Theory and Design of Structures by 

Andrew's, 
Further Problems in the Theory and 

Design of Structures by Andrew's. 
Husband and Harby's Structural En- 
gineering. 

Taylor and Thomson's Concrete Plain 
and Reinforced. 

Faber and Bowie's Reinforced Con- 
crete, 



Roorkee Manual, Railways 



Roorkee Manual, Irrigation 

Gibson's Hydraulics for Engineers ... 

Buckley' B Pocket Book 

Practical Design of Irrigation Works 

by W, C. Bligh. 
Madras, College of Engineering Manual, 

Irrigation. 

Roorkee Manual, Sanitary Engineering, 

Part I. 
Don and Chisholm's Modern Methods 

of Water purification. 



Same as Civil 

neer Class, 

Ditto 

Ditto 
Ditto 



Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 

Same as Civil 

neer Class. 

Ditto 

Ditto 
Ditto 



Engi- 



Cantell's Elementary 
Course, Reinforced 
Concrete Construc- 
tion. 

Same as Civil Engi- 
neer Class, 

Ditto 



Same ae Civil Engi- 
neer Class. 



TEXT-HOOKS UKOOMMKNDE0* 161 

TEXT-BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR THE DIFFERENT CLASSES~(<o^.) 



Subject. 



Oivil Engineer Class. 



Overseer Class, 



Water-Supply 



Process Work 



Mcpherso) i 's Distri bution . 
Box's Practical Hydraulics. 

Fiinn's Hand -hook of water workH, Design 



Sanitary Engineering 



Same as Civil 

neer Class. 

Ditto 



Engi- 



Koorkee Manual, Ferrotype Printing 
Process. 

Roorkee Manual of Sanitary Engineer- 
ing, Part II. 

Kershaw's Manual of Sewage Disposal. 

Whyatt's Sewers and Sewerage. 

The Ministry of Health, Requirements 
and other Engineering Memoranda 
by S. H. Adams York. 

Instructions for the preparation] of 
drainage projects issued by Superin- 
tending Engineer, Public Health 
Department (United Provinces). 

Santo Crimp's Tables. 

Waddell's Bridge Engineering. 

The Design and Construction of Dams 
by Wegman. 

A History of Architecture by Banister 
and Fletcher. 

Prelini and Hill's Tunnelling. 

Accounts, Public Works Department 

Code 
Hamilton and Ball's Book-keeping. 

Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics : for Syllabus, see Group II. 



Kecom mended for General 
Study. 



Elementary Mathematics, j 




Kirkman and Field's 


(including Arithmetic, 
Algebra, Geometry,^ 
Trigonometry, and | 
Mensuration). j 


i 


Aritiimetic. 
Pierpoint's Mensura- 
tion Parts I and II. 
Hall and Steven's Prac- 
tical Mathematics. 


Higher Mathematics (in- | 
eluding Geometrical 1 


Gibson's Treatise on Graphs. 
Loney's Co-ordinate Geometry. 
Fawdry and Durrcl's Calculus (for 




Conies, Analytical < 
Geometry, Differential 
and Integral Calculus). 


1st year). ^ 
Lamb's Infinitesimal Calculus (for [ 
2nd year), 
Course of Elementary Calculus by 






B. D. Puri. 




Elementary Mechanic / 


r 


A first Statics and 


(including Hydifosta-J 


Landon's Dynamics. ) 


a first Dynamics 


tics and Mechanical] 
Laboratory. ^ 


Jessop and Caunt's Hydrostatics. ] 


of Dent's Mathe- 
matical series. 



162 



TIXT-BOOK3 RECOMMENDED FOR THE DIFFERENT CL ASSE3~< > cmJ4, , 



Subject. 



Civil Engineer Class. 



Overseer Glass. 



Applied Mechanics (in- 
cluding Hydraulics, 
Strength of Materials, 
and Theory of Struc- 
tures). 



Lea's Elementary Hydraulics. 
Andrew's Further ProbJemsin Theory 

and Design of Structures. 
Moray's Theory of Structures. 



Roorkee Manual of 



Rivington's Building 
Construction Part 
IV. 



Surveying 
Drawing 

Chemistry 



Dcpartofcnt of Surveying- and Dnrtviag for Syllabus : 
flee <Qnv$ fll, 

Hoorkee Mutual of Surveying, Parts I 
and 1 1. 

ftwnfcee Matiiml ni Drawing. Pal'ts I 
and II. 



Roorkee Manual of 
Surveying, Part I. 

Same as for Civil En- 
gineer Class. 



Department >of Applied Cient)e for Syllabus :~ 



Applied Chemistry, includ- 
ing Metallurgy and the 
Chemistry of Building 
Material*. 



Natural Science 



Hcatundl^hi 



Electricity and Magne- 
tism. 



Geology 



Taylor's 8tt^ents' 
tical Chemistry. 
Let'tures No text-book 



of Pine 



The Tutorial Physics, Part II, 111, V 

and VI. 

Duncan and 8tarMfng' 'Ptiy^os. 
Heat by Kaftan, 

Technical Electricity by -Dnwidge and 



Magnetism and Klectricity'by Kicbard- 
ibn. 

Giekie's Claw-book of Geology 
Hatch's Mineralogy 



8m Group I//, 

Gregory and Hadtey^s 
Class-feook of 

PhysksB, Parts <KH 
and IV. 



TEXT-BOOKS HKCOMHKNIUCD. 168 

TEST-BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOB THE DIFFERENT CLA88ES-(cicM.) 



Subject. 



Civil Engineer Glass, 



Overseer Olasi. 



Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering for Syllabus : 



Mechanical Engineering ... 



Electrical Engineering 



Ste Ctrowp T. 
Low's Heat Engines 
Lea's Hydraulics 
Low's Applied Mechanics ... 
McKay's The' ry of Machines 

Continuous Current Engineering, by 
A, Hay, 

Alternating Current Electrical Engi- 
neering, by Philip Kemp, 

Electrical Engineering Practice, by 
J. W. Meares and U, E. Neale, 
Volumes I and II. 

Electrical Distribution net works and 
Transmission Lines by Dr. Hay. 



Group V. 



Low's Heat Kngmes. 



See Group VI. 

Junior Technical 

Electricity by R. W, 

Hutchinson. 
Electric wiring by 

W. 8. Ibbetson, 
Painters' Notes on 

Testing Lightning 

conductors. 



RULES FOK SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS. 165 



COPIES OP THE RULES FOR EXAMINATION. 



Copies of the rules relating to examination for entrance into the 
Civil Engineer, Overseer and Draftsman classes of the College are 
obtainable on application from the College on pre-payrnent of half anna 
postage. 



DUPLICATE CERTIFICATES. 



For duplicate examination certificates the following rates of fees 

are fixed : 

Rs. 
As Assistant Engineer ... ... ... 24 

> Upper Subordinate and Overseer ... ... 16 

,. Lower Subordinate ... ... ... 8 



LIBRARY. 



167 



SUBSIDIARY DEPARTMENTS OF THE 
COLLEGE. 



LIBRARY. 

1st April, 1929 contained 30,035 



The College Library on 
volumes, classified AS under: 

PART I. 
Science and Professional Works. 



Class A A. 
AB. 
B. 
C. 
1). 



Class F. 



Pure Mathematics. 
Applied Mathematics. 
Physics. 
Chemistry. 
Geology, Mineralogy 
and Palseontology. 
Other Branches of 
Natural Science. 

PART II. 
O]ifcral Literature, Art, Industrial, tc 



and 



G. 
H. 
J. 
K. 
L. 



MenUl, Moral 
Social Science, 
Civil Engineering. 
Surveying and Drawing. 
Electrical Engineering. 
Mechanical Engineering 
Other Professional 
Works. 



Clms M. ftacveatbns and Class S. 

Amusements. ,, T. 

N. Geography, Ethno- 
graphy and Travel. U. 
0. History. 
P. Literature & Philology. 
Q. Arte antl Tndies. X. 
E. Fine Arts. 

It is free to nil Gazetted Government officers, and other outttfction 
residents in special oases can obtain books on application and ret* in 
them far two month* at time. 

There is a printed Catalogue, and a Supplement rs igafttd -every 
year, which can be obtained on application to <tive Curaffeor, 
Depfit. 

The last Supplement is corrected up to 1st April, 



Commerce & Economics 
Agriculture, Forestry, 

and Gardening. 
General Scientific and 

Professional Journals 

and Transactions. 
Indian Government 

Publication*. 



168 



SUBSIDIARY DEPARTMENTS OF THE COLLEGE. 



THE LITHOGRAPHIC AND APPLIED SCIENCE 
DEPARTMENT. 

This Department executes LITHOGRAPHY, PHOTO. -ZINCOGRAPHY, 
HELIO. -ZINCOGRAPHY, and BINDING of every description, also HALF- 
TONE and PROCESS WORK for books or illustrations. Primarily it 
works for the College publications and Government departments, but 
also for the general public. 

The Photographic Section stocks a large number of negatives of 
views and objects of interest. 

Catalogues will be supplied on application. Operators can be 
sent out to take photographs, if required. 



THE BOOK DEPOT. 

The Book Depot receives and sells the various publications of the 
College Press, of which printed Catalogues can be obtained free on 
application. 



THE COLLEGE REGISTER OF EMPLOYMENT, 

The College registers the names of, and supplies employers with 
approved Engineers, Upper Subordinates, Overseers, Lower Subordi- 
nates, Draftsmen, Tracers, Photographers and Lithographers. 



THE FOLLOWING INSTITUTIONS ARE ALSO 
MAINTAINED IN CONNECTION WITH THE COLLEGE. 



1. CIVIL ENGINEERING MODEL 

ROOMS. 

2. METEOROLOGICAL OFFICE. 
8. WATER-WORKS. 

4. COLLEGE DAIRY. 

5. COLLEGE DISPENSARY. 

6. SPORTS AND ATHLETIC 

CLUBS, 



7, DEHRA DUN CONTINGENT, 

AUXILIARY FORCE INDIA, 
ROORKEE DETACHMENT. 

8. No. 15 PLATOON, SRD UNITED 

PROVINCES BATTALION, UNI- 
VERSITY TRAINING CORPS, 
INDIAN TERRITORIAL FORCE. 



LIST OF DONATIONS, 169 



List of Donations to the Thomason College for Prizes 
and other Miscellaneous purposes. 



Tear. Names. Rupee*. 

1854 Subscribers to the Thomason Testimonial Fund ... ... 2.600 

Sir Proby T. Cautley, K.C.B. ... ... ... 2,000 

1856 Lieut. T, Wright, 46th N. I. ... ... - 100 

j, W. Marshall, 48th N.I. ... ... - 100 

T. E. Dickens, Artillery ... ... - 1 

G. Bailie, Artillery ... ... ... 100 

Ensign H, E Wish, 26th N. I. ... ... ... 100 

Lieut. E. L Earle, Artillery ... ... 100 

i, E. Smalley, 36th N. I. ... ... 10 

,, ('. B, Wish, 14th Light Dragoons ... ... ... 1 

. A. B. Melville, 67th N. I, ... ... - 10 

1860 E. C. Gnrstin, 29th N, I. ... ... 10 

E. S. Wood, 93rd Highlanders ... ... - > 00 

1862 Capt. W. H. Mackesy, 79th Highlanders ... ... ... 1 

1864 Lieut. E. 0. Shepherd, General List, Infantry ... ... 100 

1865 E.W.Samuels, ... 100 
B. J. Parsons, 23rd N. T. ... ... -.- 100 

H. H. the Maharaja of Cashmere ... ... - 500 

Lieut. J. E. Sandeman. General List, Infantry ... ... 100 

Captain F. G. S. Parker, 54th Regiment ... ... ... 100 

F. D. M. Brown, V.C., 101st Regiment ... . 100 

Lieutenant L. Wavell 22nd N. I. ... ... ... 100 

Peter Keay, Esq. ... ... 120 

1867 Lieutenant W. S. Lillingston, M.A., 7th Hussars ... ... 200 

1868 B. C. Elliston, 58th Regiment ... ... . 100 

1869 Colonel R. Maclagan, R.E., (for " Maclagan" Prize Endowment^ ... 1,000 
laser Chandar Sirkar ... ... ... 60 

,, Sergt. W. Sinclair, E.E. ... ... ... 50 

G. W. Dowsworth, Esq. ... ... ... 100 

Mr. J. Mole ... ,. ... 50 

Mr. J. Lyons ... ... .. 50 

Mr. S. Eraser ... ... ... 20 

Sergt. P. Kelly ... ... ... 50 

Lieut. G. Nolan ... ... ... 100 

Mr. J. Ferris ... .. ... 20 

lAla Bihari Lai ... ... ... 100 

t, Mr. C. Chisholm ... ... ... 30 

* Mr. H. Mitchell ., ... ... 20 



QF 

* 

Nawet Rupee*. 

1869 Mr. T. Gray .. .. .. 25 

Mr. J. Southon ,. ,. .. 25 

Serpt. A. Forsyth .. .. .. 30 

Mr. J. H. Chapman .. .. .. 1$ 

Mr. G. Me Arthur ., . ..50 

Mr. J.Gillan .. .. .. 25 

Mr. W. Phillips .* ., .. 300 

Mr. C. Collogher ,. .. ,. 250 

1870 Kai Bahadur Kanhya Lai (for ' Kanhya Lai " Prize Endowment} .. 100 
Captain 0, E. I). Branson, 37th P. N. I. ,. .. 100 
,, Dr. Murray Tfromaion, M,r>., F.R.S.B. .. .. .. 200 

1872 Lieutenant G W. Martin, 88th Regiment ... .. .. 100 

1873 Vf.\V\\\^QCi^YMi\.(tn Engineer Stvdent Mess) .. .. 100 

E. Hodges, Esq. .. .. .. 100 

,, II. H. the Maharaja of Vizianagram .. .. .. 1,000 

1874 K. B. Smart, Esq. (Hev. Sur ) (for Surveying Prize} .. .. 100 
U. W. L. Hawkins, Esq. (to Engineer Student Mess) .. .. 100 
Lieutenant W. T. McLaughlin, 48th Regiment, (to ditto) .. 100 
Reginald II. MeLaughlin, Eaq (to ditto) ,. .. 50 

1875 V. B. Paterson, Esq. ) 
8 Jarnian, Esq. [ 

;; p.j. M ci; B L,K,q. [^ *-/.) .90 

R L. Campbell, Esq. ) 

K, W. L. Toozs, Esq. (to ditto) ,. .. .. 100 

A. E. Adie, Esq. (to ditto) .. .. .. 40 

., Lieutenant S. M. May cock, R.E, (for Mechanism Prize") .. ,, 60 

,, II. B. Smart, Esq. (Rev. Sur.) (for Surveying Prize) .. ,. 100 
W. A Francken, Esq., Assistant Superintendent. Canal Foundry 

(to College Recreation Fund) .. .. .. 50 

1876 Lieutenant S. M. May cock. R.B., (for Mechanism, Prize} ,. W 
Captain Allan Cunningham, it, is, (J'or Applied Mathematics /*ri^),. 50 
., Subscribers to Keay Memorial (balance of subscriptions ftfter erect- 
ing Tablet) .. ,. ".. 1,000 

1877 H, H. the Maharaja of Jummoo and Cashmere ,. ., 1,0^0 
RajaofRutlam . .. .. 100 
Captain Allan Cunningham, R E. (for Applied Mvthmotie* Pi$z),, 50 

Rai Bahadur Kunhya Lai (to change the Prj*e findowpiflat of 
1870 to the "Rai Bahadur Kunhya Lai Gold Medal," similar 

to Thomason Medal) .. .. ,. 1,5QO 

Lieutenant S. M. Maycock, R,E. (for Mechanism Prize) .. .., 50 

Colonel J. G. Medley, R.E. (yearly since 1863, at Rs. 50) ., 750 

Major A. M. Brandreth, R.E. (for Note Book and English &*tiz*tf) . 50 

J. T. Farrant, Esq. (to Engineer Student Mess) .. . . 1QO 

Colonel J. G. Medley, R.?:. (for Civil Engineering Prize) .. 

Lieutenant S. M. Maycocl^, R.K. (for Mechanism Prize}, . .. ^0 



LIU* 0* DO&AtlONfL Ill 

Ytttr. Names. Rupee*. 

1078 Major A, M. iirandreth, R,E. (for Note Book and English Prizes) .. 50 

, Anonymous from Jhati&i .. . . .. 100 

1880 Colonel J. G. Medley, B.E. (for Civil Engineering Priz*) . , 50 
Lieut, 8 M. Maycoak, B.E. (for Surveying Prize) ., .. 50 
Major A. M. Brandreth, R.E. (for 19M? Bm>h\ English a rtfl Roma- 
nised Urdu Prizes) . .. .. 70 

Babu Krishna Chandra Banerji (for Mathematics) .. .. 50 

1881 Colonel J. G. Medley. R.B, (for Civil Engineering Prize) .. 50 
Lieut, S, M. Maycock, B.B (for Surveying Prize) . . . r>0 
Major A, M, Brandreth, B,E. (for NQte Hook, English and Roma- 
nised Urdu Prizes) .. . . . . 70 

W. P. Housden, Esq. (to Engineer Student Mess) . .. 100 

18& Colonel J. G Medley, fc;E, tfor Civil Engineering Prise) . . 50 
Lieut.-Col A. M. Brandreth, K.fi (for Note ftvok, English and 

Romanised Urdu Prizes') . . . . . . 70 

Lieut J. H. C Harrisdn, R.E. (to Engineer Student Metis) .. 100 

Lieut. J. H. C. Harrison, B.E, (for bilrvetying Prize) . . 50 

1883 Colonel J, G. Medley, K.E. (for Civil Engineering JPriW) . 50 
Liertt.-Col. A. M. Brandreth, B.B, (for Note ffock, English and 

Romanised Urdu Prizes) .. . . 70 

Lieut. J. H. C. Harrison, B.E, (for Surveying Prize) .. .. 50 

1884 Lieut.-Col. A. M. Brandreth, E.E. (for Ciril Engineering, Note ftdok 

and English Prizes) .. .. .. 100 

1885 Lieut.-Col. A. M. Bratidreth, R.fi;. (for Civil Engineering, Note Book 

and Estimating Prizes) .. .. 100 

Lala Behari Lfll {for Language Prize} .. .. .. 15 

1886 Lieut -Col. A. M. Brandreth, R.E. (for Civil bngivtee/'hig. Note Bool' 

and Estimating Prizes) .. .. .. 10<> 

,, Lala Bihari Lai (for Language Prize) .. ,. 15 

1887 Lieut.Col A M. Brandreth, R.E. (for Civil Engineering, Ndte Book 

and Estimating Prize*) . . . . 1 50 

Lala Bihari Lai (fo* Language Prize) . 15 
Rai Bahadur Kunhya Lai, to found Silver MtodaU for Nativea of 

Upper and Lower Subordinate Classes .. .. 1,000 

1888 Lifettt.-Col, A. M. Brandreth, R.E. (for Civil Engineering , Note Book 

and Estimating Prize*) ,. .. .. 100 

Lftte Bihari Lai (for language Prize') .. ... . . 15 

Rai Bahadur Kunhya Lai . . . 100 

1889 Lieut-Col. A. M. Brandreth, B.E. (for Civil Engineering, Note Moo* 

and Estimating Prizes} .. .. . . 100 

Lala Bihari Lai (for Language Prize] . .. .. 15 

1890 Lieut -Col A. M. Brandreth, R,E. (for Cml Engineering^ Note Book 

and Estimating Prizes) . . . . 1 00 

Lala Bihari Lai (for Language Prizes) .. 16 

1891 Lieut-Col. A. M. Brandreth, B.r., (for Civil Engineering, Note Book 

and Estimating Prises} 



172 LIST OK DONATIONS. 

Year. Names. Rupees. 

1891 Kai Bahadur Kunhya Lai (for Language Prize) . . ,. 16 

1892 Colonel F. D. M. Brown, v.c. (for Civil Engineering Piize) .. 50 
Rai Bahadur Bihari Lai (for Language Prize) .. , 15 

1893 Major J. Clibborn (for Civil Engineering prize) ,. ., 60 
Rai Bahadur Bihari Lai (for Language Prize) ,, ... 15 

1894 Major T. Clibborn (for Civil Engineering Prize) . . . . 50 
,, Rai Bahadur Bihari Lai (for Language Prize) . .. 15 

1895 Major J. Clibborn (for Civil Engineering Prize) ., .. 50 
Rai Bahadur Bihari Lai (for Language Prize) .. . . 15 

1896 Lieut-Col, J. Clibborn (for Civil Engineering Prize) .. .. 60 
H, E. the Prime Minister of Nepal for a Tower Clock ,. .. 2,500 

1897 Lieut,-Col J. Clibborn (j'or Civil Engineering Prize) .. .. 50 

1898 Lieut. H. B. D. Campbell, K.E. (for Civil Engineering Prise) ,. 12 
Rai Bahadur Gobind J as (for English) .. .. ,. 16 

1899-1900 Lieut.-Col. J. Clibborn (for Civil Engineering Prize) .. 12 
190619221924 Babu Amar Nath Dutt, B.A., LL.B. (for best Indian 

student obtaining $ub- Engineer's certificate, U. S, class) .- 15 

19061917 Lala Ram Sahai (for Language Prize, L. # class) 15 

1908 Members of the Fairley Memorial Prize Committee (for Applied 

Mechanics, U. S. clans) . . , . . . 500 
1909 1912 Sirdar Kishan Singh (for Drawing, Mechanical Apprentice 

class) .. ..11 

1909 Calcott-Reilly Memorial Fund haH been transferred to this College on 

the abolition of the Royal Indian Engineering College, Coopers 

Hill, England (Gold Medal for Applied Mechanics) ., 1,800 
Donations from Ghuhim Nabi and other F. W. Subordinates to found 
the Sullivan Scholarship Medal Endowment Fund for the Lower 

Subordinates of this College ... .. .. 2,000 

1911 ) 917 Rai Nathu Mai Sahib (for best senior Indian student , U.S. 

class) .. .. .. 95 

1911 19 J 4 Sri jut Hem Chander Baugh (for Natural Science, Mechanical 

Apprentice class) . . , . . 15 

19211923 Sir Sidney Crookshank for cricket . . , , . . 80 

1922-27 Sushila and J Mittra Memorial Silver Medal . . . . 15 

1923-24 Babu Amar Nath Dutt, B.A.. LL.B, (for best Indian student in 

Civil Engineer class in Civil Engineering Design) . . . . 16 

1923 H, E Sir Edward Maclagan's prize (for best Civil Engineer class 

student in Civil Engineering Design) . . . 100 
Babu Amar Nath Datt, B.A. LL. B., (for best Indian Student 

Obtaining Higher Certificate in Overseer Class) . . . . 15 



RULES OF THE COLLEGE ADVISORY COUNCIL. 17$ 

RULES OF THE COLLEGE 
ADVISORY COUNCIL. 



Approved by Government. 

Function. l, The function of the Council will be to advise Govern- 
ment on questions of policy, organization, finance, staff, 
buildings, equipment, the formation or re- constitution of 
classes, Curricula, rules of admission and any other subject 
connected with the College on which Government may require 
its advice, As the Council will be closely associated with 
the College and will visit it periodically, it will also be in a 
position to take the initiative in suggesting improvememts 
and reforms in respect of any of the above matters. 
Constitution. 2. The Council will consist of : 

(1). The Chief Engineer, Public Works Department, 

Buildings and Roads Branch ; 
(2). The Chief Engineer, Public Works Department, 

Irrigation Branch. 
(3). The Divisional Superintendent, E, I. Railway., 

Lucknow. 

(4). The Director of Public Instruction, United Pro- 
vinces ; 

(5). The Director of Industries, United Provinces ; 
(6). The Principal, Thomason College, Roorkee ; 
(7). A member to be nominated by the University of 

Allahabad ; 
(8). A member to be nominated by the Upper India 

Chamber of Commerce ; 

(9), A member to be nominated by the United Pro- 
vinces Chamber of Commerce ; 

(10). One member of the Staff of the Thomason College, 
Roorkee, in addition to the Principal of the 
College, to be nominated by Government for 
a period of three years ; 



if4 



fltf fftt CrJttEGB 



COUNCIL. 



I 1 resilient. 



Secretary. 



Term of 
office of uon- 
offlcittl theffi- 



Meetings 



Notice. 



Quorum, 



(II). One non-offieia) member of the Board of Indus- 
tries, United Prdvirices, to t) elected by the 
nbri-t)fficial rriehibfers of the Brrard from amongst 
their number ; 

(12). and (18 j. Two non-official members of the 
U. P. Legislative (Jouncil, to be elected by the 
non-official members of the Council ; and 

(14). A representative of the United Provinces branch 
of the Institution of Ehgineers, India, 

3. The senior Chief Engineer, Public Works Depart- 
ment or in his absence, the senior official member present, 
will preside. The ruling of the President in regard to all 
questions of procedure shall be final. 

4. The Principal of the College will be ex-officto Secre- 
tary of the Council. 

5. The term of office of non-official members of this 
Council shall be for a period of three years,* provided that 
a member shall cease to be a member of the Advisory Coun- 
cil when he ceases to be a member of the body which he 
represents ; a new election shall be held by each new Legis- 
lative Council at its first session, and, at the same time, 
other bodies shall be required to make their nominations 

6. There will be at least 2 ordinary meetings yearly, at 
Lucknow Allahabad, Naini Tal or Roorkee as fixed by the 
President, but the Council may hold any other meetings 
whenever it appears desirable to do so, at any station fixed 
by the President. 

7. Notice of the time and place of meeting will be issued 
to each member by the Secretary at least 6 weeks in advance. 

8. Fotir members of the Council, exclusive of the 
Principal Who fflust always bfe present, shall constitute a 
qudrnm. 

Me. &hbuld the qudrtim fail and shbuld the president consider the 
meeting fts constituted specialty competent to discuss the issue in point, 
the proceedings shall go forward, the opinion of the other members 
being subsequently obtained by circular. 



BULBS OF THE COLLEGE ADVISORY OOUKOIL, 175 

Urgent cases. 9. The Secretary of the Council may in urgent and other 
cases, submit matters for the opinion of the Council by 
correspondence. 
Disposal of 10. The proceedings of the Council after approval will 

Proceedings, be printed and six copies sent to the Local Government and 
one copy to each member, a verified copy of each paragraph 
of the proceedings being sent to the Local Government 
separately for orders. 

Experts and jj. The Council is authorised to call in experts for the 

Sub-Commit- con gyration of any question on which experts ' advice is 
required, and to recommend the appointment of Sub-Com- 
mittees to deal with particular questions or with special 
branches of the work of the College? Before consulting any 
expert whom it is proposed to remunerate for his advice, the 
Council should obtain the sanction of Government to the 
payment of such remuneration. 

Allowances. 12. The official members when attending meetings will 
draw travelling allowance under the rules. The non-official 
members will each be paid the ordinary travelling and daily 
allowance admissible to an officer of the first class. Non- 
official members elected by the United Provinces Legislative 
Council as their representatives on the council are entitled 
for attending meetings of the College Council to travelling 
allowance and also the daily allowance of Be . 10 on the 
terms ordinarily admissible to members of the Legislative 
Council. 

Visits of in- 18. It is expected of members that they will from time 

spection. ^ t - me ^ personal visits of inspection to the College and 
thus keep in touch with its circumstances, its work and its 
needs and aspirations. 



BULBS OP THE COLLEGE BOARD OF STUDIES. 177 

RULES OF THE COLLEGE BOARD OF 
STUDIES. 

Approved by Government. 

1. The members of the Board will include the Principal, all Pro- 
lessors of the College and the Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. The Principal will be ex-officio President. 

2. The meetings of the Board will be convened by order of the 
President. 

8. The Secretary will be elected from among the members of the 
Board. 

4. The Secretary will circulate, before each meeting, a copy of the 
Agenda, together with the necessary papers relating to subjects 
entered for discussion. 

5. Any member, with the previous sanction of the President, may 
bring forward for discussion any subject of an Academic nature 
pertaining to the College work. 

6. The Board of Studies will be an Advisory Body; it will not, 
exercise any control over discipline, but, in consultation with the 
President, will assist him in. 

(a) the moderation of examination papers for the College final 

and sessional examinations ; 

(b) the scrutiny of the sessional pass lists, and the award of 

grace marks under the procedure laid down for their 
allotment bj Government order ; 

(c) the allotment of marks for " General Fitness," except the 

marks awarded by the medical officer and those for 
Athletics, Games and Military training ; 
(<i) the preparation or revision of all time tables, syllabuses, 
and courses of study for the College. 

7. The President, at his discretion, may at any time consult the 
Board on any other subject affecting the College work. 

8. The minutes of each meeting will be recorded by the Secretary, 
find read and confirmed at the following meeting. 



STANDING ORDERS. 179 



STANDING ORDERS OF THE THOMSON 
CIVIL ENGINEERING COLLEGE, ROORKEK 

1929-30. 



General Rules. 



1. Students on arrival will report as follows : 

All students of the Civil Engineer Class, to the Personal Assistant 
to the Principal ; other students, to the Superintendent of Overseer 
Class Hostels, who will allot them quarters. 

2. Each student will be responsible for the state of the quarters 
allotted to him, and will be charged for the repair of any damage 
which they may sustain beyond fair and unavoidable wear ana tear. 
Accidental injury or disrepair should be immediately brought to the 
notice of the Officer-in-charge of the Class concerned with a view to 
its rectification. 

3. No visitors, other than students of the Class to which the 
occupier belongs, are to enter students' quarters without the sanction 
of the Principal. 

4. Furniture, at a nominal rent will, as far as possible, be provided 
for students of the Civil Engineer Class for use in the hostels, and 
damage to the same will be assessed by the Personal Assistant to the. 
Principal. Such furniture is not to be removed from the rootus, or 
used for the Project or Triangulation Camps without permission [see 
Project Regulations 52 (16)]. Special furniture will be provided 
for Project Camps. Students of classes, other than the Civil Engi- 
neer Class, will make their own arrangements for furniture. 

5. All students will engage their own servants. To prevent men 
of known bad character being employed as servants, students are 
required to bring before the Personal Assistant to the Principal, or 
their Superintendent, for sanction and regie tration, all men they may 
wish to engage as servants. Men of unsatisfactory character are 
entered as such in the College register, and must not be employed as 
servants by any person residing in the College lines. No person, 



i$0 STANDING ORDERS. 

except College or registered servants, or approved guests, will be 
allowed to live in the hostels or servants quarters or to enter them 
after nightfall, the Personal Assistant to the Principal will afford 
every assistance to students in obtaining servants at suitable wages 
on application being made to him. The wages of private servants 
must be paid by the 10th of the month following that for which 
they are due. 

6. All information as to Text-Books, Courses of Study, dates of 
examinations, attendances, etc., will be found in the College Calendar 
and the Course of Study pamphlet. 

7. All necessary books can be obtained at the College Book Depot 
between the hours of 11 A.M. and 1 P.M. 

8. Students are reminded that this is a College for young men 
and not a school for boys. Though all needful assistance will be given 
to those really anxious to work, it is entirely on their own exertions 
that their success must depend ; and in cases of failure, they will only 
have themselves to blame. They are, however, specially warned against 
idleness in their First year under the expectation that they can pick 
up in the Second or Third. The course is so laid out that continuous 
application is required for the whole time, Students are reminded 
that if they fail to make sufficient progress in their studies, they are 
liable to be suspended or removed from the College at any time. 

9. All students will attend at the College regularly for studies at 
the hours laid down in the Time-table, and for out-door duties at the 
time prescribed by the Officer in charge of their Class or their Pro- 
fessors, Lecturers, or Instructors. No student may be absent from his 
quarters in the College lines without leave after 9 p.m. during the winter 
term, and 10 p,m. during the summer term, or before sunrise. The 
punishment for breaking this rule will be of the severest description. 
To enable the authorities to check this rule no doors should be locked 
at the times specified above. Students are permitted to sleep imme- 
diately outside, and in front of, their quarters during the hot weather. 

10. All smoking, spitting, whistling or making any loud noise in 
the College is strictly prohibited. Students should be careful to do 
nothing which may interrupt, or distract others at work. 

11. No debts are allowed to be contracted. All articles purchased 
(except those supplied from the College Stores) must be paid for in 



STAKDINO ORDERS. 1$1 

cash. Students are strictly cautioned against all irregularities in 
money matters. Flagrant cases, which tend to bring discredit on the 
College, will result in dismissal. 

12. All dues from students, recovered by the College, whether 
payable to Government or to private funds, persons or bodies, must, 
for any month, be punctually discharged in full before the 21st of that 
month, failing which the students will be fined marks, suspended or 
removed at the discretion of the Principal. 

13. The Principal and the Officers-in-charge of Classes will always 
be glad to give any help and advice in their power, and students are 
earnestly requested to apply to one or the other in any case where they 
are in doubt as to the right course, before taking action. Students 
should consult the Officers-in-charge of their Classes for advice before 
referring the case to the Principal. 

14. Any case of personal violence by one student to another, 
or by a student to any other person, will be punished severely. A 
student is never to take the law into his own hands, but is to report 
any grievance direct to the Officer-in-charge of his Class for enquiry. 

15. Students wishing to see the Principal should apply for permis- 
sion through the Officer-in-charge of their Class. Direct application 
to the Principal is contrary to orders. Petitions signed by a number 
of students are not allowed. Any matter affecting a class, or a number 
of students, should be brought to notice by the senior student 
concerned. 

16. Students are strongly recommended to take a fair amount of 
bodily exercise regularly ; too much poring over books is very apt to 
muddle the brain, and the active duties of the Engineering profession 
require a man to be as well trained physically as mentally to enable 
him to discharge them properly. 

17. The Library is open daily at the hours specified in para. 66. 
Students are invited to avail themselves of it. The periodicals and 
papers placed on the Reading Room table for general use are not to be 
removed from the room. Loud talking in the Library or Reading 
Room is strictly prohibited. 

18. No spirituous or fermented liquors are to be brought into the 
College lines, except as supplied under the usual regulations and 
authorized by the Principal* United waters are manufactured under 



182 STANDING ORDERS. 

careful supervision at the College Stores, and students should avoid 
purchasing serated waters elsewhere. 

19. Every instance of intemperance will be punished by immediate 
dismissal from the College. 

20. Making use of fire-arms within the station limits is strictly 
prohibited. Students will not be permitted, even though in possession 
of a license, to bring fire-arms into their quarters without the per- 
mission of the Principal. 

21. Students may keep dog?, but they must not be left loose if 
unattended. Dogs must invariably be chained up at night. All 
dogs must be registered and numbered in a register kept by the 
Personal Assistant to the Principal and must wear a collar and a 
special badge. Any dog found within the lines without a collar and 
badge is liable to be shot. The Personal Assistant will supply the 
necessary badges on payment. These badges may be returned at any 
time when not needed and payment will be refunded. 

22. Dancing, singing parties, and the playing of musical instru- 
ments in the open, are not allowed without the special sanction of the 
Principal in every case. 

23. Students are warned to be very careful to have their quarters 
securely locked when they are absent from them. Any case of theft 
of the property of a student or of Government must be reported 
immediately to the Officer-in-charge of the Class to ensure prompt and 
effective investigation. It after College hours, the theft should be 
reported to the Hostel Superintendent who will take immediate action 
and also report to the Officer-in-charge of the Class. 

24. All students are expected at all times to be dressed in a neat 
and tidy manner, whether in or out of Class, and must not appear at 
Class in flannels or shorts used for games without special permission. 

25. Only such plates and note books as are specially sanctioned by 
the Principal will be returned to students. These plates and note- books 
are on no account to be given to other students studying in the 
College, Students should bear in mind that this is a competitive 
College, and that, any means tending to give any one student an unfair 
advantage must render the competition unequal and in time reduce the 
value of certificates granted and affect the good name of the College. 
Any breach of this rule will be severely dealt with. 



STANDING ORDRRB. 188 

26. Private servants are not allowed to enter the Class rooms. 
Drawing boards, etc., should be taken from, and made over to, servants 
in the verandah by the student to whom they belong. Private servants 
are not allowed to loiter in the verandahs of the College and students 
are expected to see that this rule is enforced. 

27. Students must occupy seats at the numbered tables in the 
order of their standing in the class. Particular care should be taken 
not to splash ink on the tables, walls or floors, or to deface the furni- 
ture of Class rooms and Lecture rooms in any way by writing or 
cutting. 

28. Students wishing to have baggage or parcels brought to the 
College from the Railway Station should give notice to the Personal 
Assistant to the Principal, before 2 P.M. on the day the goods arrive. 
This notice should be in writing, giving the number of their quarters, 
and a detail of the baggage or parcel. The railway receipt, signed, and 
tiie amount due for railway carriage, should be sent with the notice. 

29. All students, on meeting the Principal, or any of the staff of 
the College, will salute them in a respectful manner. All students will 
address members of the College teaching staff as " Sir " when on 
duty. 

30. In any Class the student standing first in order of merit will 
be the senior. The senior of a Class is responsible that any unusual 
occurrences or circumstances connected with his Class are promptly 
reported to the Officer-in-charge of the Class. He will take charge 
of Survey parties and arrange all details in camp. 

81. All students must vacate College quarters during the Vacation. 

32. Fruit on trees in the College lines is not to be plucked by 
students or their servants. 

33. Three guest rooms, one European, one Mahomedan and one 
Hindu, are available for the use of the relatives of students on applica- 
tion to the Personal Assistant to the Principal. 

34. Students are not allowed to be members of societies, nor are 
they allowed to join in discussions on public matters. 

35. Students of the Civil Engineer Class, who gain a period of 
practical training, are prohibited from attempting to obtain either 
premature information of their posting to guaranteed appointments and 
apprenticeships gained by them or consideration of their claims to be 



184 STANDING ORDERS. 

posted to the Provinces and Branches selected by them, from the 
Government of India Secretariat or a local Government Secretariat. 

36. Students are expressly forbidden to approach Examiners, whe- 
ther internal or external, with enquiries concerning marks, prior to 
their publication ; and students are hereby warned that any such 
enquiries will be dealt with as a serious breach of the College Rules. 

36A. Students will not be permitted to appear for any external 
examination during their College course except to complete an 
University examination incompleted through sickness prior to their 
admission. 

37. The attendance of all students at the College Sports and 
Regatta is compulsory, 



LEAVE. 

88. Students mast not leave the station without sanction. Appli- 
cation for leave must be, in all cases, first submitted to the Officer-in- 
char^e of the Class concerned, who will submit the application to the 
Principal, except for such leave as is covered by recognized public 
holidays when the Officer-in-charge of the Class is authorized to sanc- 
tion such leave. If the leave is sanctioned, in the case of the Engineer 
Class, the address whilst on leave will be noted by the Officer-in-charge 
and the application returned to the student, who will report his 
departure and arrival and also his address while on leave, to the 
Hostel Superintendent in a book kept by him for that purpose. 

In the case of all other students, the leave application, after being 
signed by the Officer-in-charge of the Class, will be forwarded to the 
Principal for sanction (except as noted above), and returned through 
the Officer-in-charge of the Class to the Officer-in-charge of the Hostel 
of the applicant, to whom all reports of departure and arrival must be 
made. Under ordinary circumstances applications for leave must be 
submitted before noon on the day previous to that on which leave is 
required ; an application for leave, submitted after this time, should 
only be recommended by the Officer-in-charge of the Class tinder very 
special circumstances regarding which the student has produced due 
evidence. 

89. When the period of leave includes any attendances in College, 
the leave application must be initialled as approved by the staff con- 



STANDING ORDERS. 185 

cerned. It should then be submitted to the Officer-in-charge of the 
Glass. 

40. Students are warned that absence without leave is a serious 
breach of rules. The senior student present in a room at the first 
attendance of the day is bound to report at once to his Supervising 
Officer the absence without leave or sickness of any member of the room. 

41. To obtain leave and proceed on short leave, and then to ask for 
an extension, except on the most urgent grounds, is a practice considered 
highly objectionable in Government service, and the College authorities 
take the same view. The mere despatch of an application for extension 
is no excuse for failure to return on the proper date. A sanction to the 
extension by the Principal is necessary, and to obtain this each application 
should be accompanied by a stamped addressed envelope, and all 
telegrams are to be prepaid. These should be despatched to the 
Principal early enough for the applicant to receive a reply in time. 
If no reply is received the application for extension should be considered 
as refused. Students who, being on leave, fail to return to the College 
on the day on which the leave expires without receiving sanction to an 
extension, will be considered guilty of disobedience of orders and will 
be punished accordingly. 

42. Students on return from leave must report themselves at once 
to their Hostel Superintendent. 

43. Students requiring leave will apply on the forms provided for 
the purpose, which can be obtained from the Book Depot, but students 
are not required to apply for leave to enjoy sanctioned holidays in the 
station or for the Vacation out of the station. No leave will be given 
to attend the weddings of relatives, 

44. Banya's, tailor's, shoemaker's, baker's, and sweetmeat seller's 
shops are established in the College bazaar buildings for the benefit 
of students and are under College supervision. It is desirable that 
students should patronize these shops rather than purchase elsewhere. 



SICKNESS. 

45. The College Medical Officer will attend at the College Hospital 
daily at 6-80 A.M. from the 15th February to the 15th September, 
and at 8 A.M. from the 16th September to the 14th February. All 
students, who require medical attendance, must present themselves at 



186 STANDING ORDERS. 

the proper hour for treatment. Those who are too ill to attend personally 
must send a notice to the College Medical Officer at this hour, WBO 
will visit them in their quarteis. This is. however, only to be done 
in really serious cases. At 10 A.M. the morning statement is sent to 
the Principal, and any case of sickness after this hour will be treated 
as emergent. In emergent cases the College Medical Officer (who 
lives in No. 10 College Bungalow) will be always available and 
should be sent for at once. 

46 If any student falls sick after the hospital hour, and is 
compelled to absent himself from class attendance on that account, or 
if during College hours obtains permission to leave on account of 
sickness, he must at once report to the College Medical Officer in all 
cases. Ke is required to attend hospital next morning, and the 
College Medical Officer will note on the Sick Report at what time the 
notice of sickness was received. 

47. A student placed on the sick list will remain on the #ick list 
till taken off by the College Medical Officer. He will report daily at 
the hospital at the specified hour while on the sick list, unless specially 
exempted by that officer, Students on the sick list excused from work 
or attendance at College are iot permitted to leave their quarters, 
except for medical purposes, without tho written authority of the 
College Medical Officer, initialled by the Principal. On the written 
application of the College Medical Officer, the Personal Assistant to 
the Principal is authorised to erect a necessary tent near the quarters 
of any sick student. 

48. Students who have been frequently sick during the year will 
lose marks for physical fitness. 

49. All Indian servants belonging to the College or to students, 
who require medical treatment, should attend at the hospital at the 
authorized hour. 

50. No student may be treated privately. All cases of sickness 
must be reported and entered on the Sick Report. Any student 
concealing a case of sickness will be severely dealt with. 

51. The College Medical Officer wil) visit the hostels, cook-houses, 
latrines, an4 grounds once a week to see that the sanitary arrange- 
ments are property carded out, and wij| send a report every Momjay 
momjng to the Principal concerning* any defects he may obaefjre, or 
any improvements that he may wish to suggest, 



STANDING ORDKRK. lS? 

EXAMINATIONS- 

52. fye work given in by students at examinations, Projects, or at 
any time during the course, is accepted as their own hottest and unaided 
work ; any attempt to deceive the staff about it in any way whatever, 
will, on detection, be punished by immediate expulsion. No excuse 
whatever will be accepted. 

53. Any student not present at any examination From whatever 
cause will lose all marks for the same, 

54. Valuing the answers to an examination is a very tedious and 
difficult matter, and each slovenly set of answers wastes time and tem- 
per, and causes all to suffer. . The following rules which are all really 
in favour of honest, regular men, will be strictly enforced, and marks 
deducted in each case in which they are infringed or not acted up to. 

(I). Carefully read and minutely adhere to the instructions 
printed on the cover of the books issued to students to write 
their answers in. These instruction? are as follows : 

(1). Number your answers to correspond witn the numbers 
of the questions, and if the question is divided into 
sub-heads be careful to number these also. 

(2). No art of this book is to be torn off. 

(3). The whole of the work, including all rough work, is to 
be written in this book. 

(4). No writing whatever is allowed on any other paper, except 
squared paper when required for an answer. Each 
sheet of squared paper must be headed as required 
under Regulations (III). 

(5). The paper should be ruled, or folded, so as to mark 
a margin on the left-hand side. This margin maj 
be narrow when no rough work is required, but 
should be a third of the width of the paper when 
rough work is needed. 

(6). The hand-writing should be distinct. 

(7) Both sides of the paper should be written upon, 

(8). In the event of this book becoming filled up^ another 
book must be used and the number used written 
below, there is a tendency anidng'et students to 
waste their own and the examiner's tittle by writing 
unnecessarily lengthy answers! by needless repetition, 



186 BtANftlKG 

and by using a large number of answer books. One 
answer book should generally suffice. All answers 
should be as concise as possible, and, if sufficient 
thought is exercised before the answer is committed 
to paper, all repetition can be avoided. Careless and 
lengthy answers will entail a loss of marks. 

( 9). These books are not to be folded but forwarded flat, and 
if more than one book is used by the same student 
the second and succeeding books mufct be placed, 
inside the first. 

(10). Htudents with roll numbers using this book, are not 
to make any allusion to their names or initials, or 
to make any marks by which they may be identified. 

(11). Fill in the index on the next page. 

(II) The index on the inside of the cover of the book should be 
carefully filled in. Students must fill in against each question 
attempted the word "answered." In the case of questions 
having separate parts (a), (), (c), each separate part 
attempted should be indexed as u answered." Nothing 
should be entered against questions which have not been 
attempted. 

(III). In final examinations the student will be given a roll 
number to use instead of his name. This must be put in 
the right-hand top corner of each bqok. The number of the 
question should be put at the top of the centre of each sheet 
(IV). The examiner will mark under three heads:- 
(1). Knowledge of the subjects. 
(2). Accuracy in working. 
(3). Clearness of working and expression. 

If the student fails in (IV) (3), even though perfect in (1) and (2) 
he will lose marks. He is bound to show clearly how he obtained 
his results, and the Examiner has no time to waste to wade through 
slovenly work or roundabout methods. 
Take a mathematical examination for example : 

(a). Each process should be headed with a word or two of 
explanation. 



STANDING ORDERS. 189 

(b). All work having to be done in the book, each step or 

calculation that cannot be done in the head must be 



done in the margin with a mark for reference, 
(c). All work known to be useless must be scored out. 
(d). The answer must be plainly marked. Write the word 
" answer " opposite the answer in each case ; thus x SB 
answer. 

(V). Students mast bring their own pens, inks, pencils and 
drawing instruments and the use of slide rules may be 
permitted at the discretion of the Examiner. No borrowing 
from each other is allowed during an examination. 
(VI). No books or papers of any sort are to be brought into the 
examination room ; Logarithm tables, graph, and drawing 
paper when necessary, will be provided. 

(VII), No student may leave his seat for any reason except to quit 
the room. After having once loft the room, for any reason 
whatever, he cannot return. A student wanting another 
book will call an attendant who will bring it to him. 
(VIII). When time is up the Examiner will call out ' cease writing," 
after which order pen must not be put to paper for any 
purpose whatever. 

(IX). The use of red ink or of coloured pencils should be avoided 
when possible, as the Examiner usually makes corrections 
in red ink or blue. 

PROJECT REGULATIONS (INCLUDING TOURS). 

Notes for the guidance of students in drawing up Projects. 

55. (1). The collaboration of students during Projects isforbidden t 
and in this connection attention is expressly drawn to Standing 
Order No. 52 and to the penalty for its infringement. It must be 
remembered that Projects are competitive examinations subject to 
the ordinary examination rules. Students are warned that they are 
allowed to obtain assistance solely from (a) technical books in general, 
(b) plans and models in the Model Room and Library, (c) plans of any 
eO'isting engineering work which they moy obtain from a source which is 
equally open to other students of thetr year.* 

* Vide Standing Order No 86. Such plans should in any cu*e be shown to tbe Prof. C. E. 



190 STANDING ORDERS, 

It is forbidden to obtain survey maps or level charts from outside 
sources^ or any assistance in designing or calculating from outside the 
College. Students are not permitted to obtain previous engineering projects 
executed by past students for the purpose of assisting them in their work. 
Finally, in the absence of specific Project regulations, the best guide 
to a student's conduct is his own sense of honour. 

(2). A Project is expected to be a piece of work sqch that a senior 
officer can examine, criticise, pass orders on it, and hand it over for 
execution. To ensure this result it niust be complete in every sense. It 
must include a clear concise report with cross references to all drawings ; 
a survey which can be checked with ease and celerity, and drawings from 
which work or working drawings can be produced and from which the 
estimate can be checked. The drawings must be neat, but should have 
no unnecessary elaboration. Calculations should be given for all impor- 
tant structural items. A student must carefully think out his work. 
Having gone over the ground he should scheme out his survey. To 
ensure that he has time to submit ail necessary work, all work in the 
field nius^ be done neatly and methodically. 

(3). Having completed the field work the student is required to 
complete his Project in the College. Work in quarters is not per- 
mitted on plates, but this does not prevent a student from thinking 
out his designs, and making sketches and calculations in his spare time. 
He must again map oat a methodical scheme if he is to submit a 
complete Project. Every plate should be numbered, with a heading 
showing what the plate represents. A scale should be noted down for 
each drawing and sufficient dimensions should be given both for the 
estimate and for actual work References to conventional signs need 
only be shown on one sheet for the whole Project. 

(4). Above all the student should endeavour to show a sense of 
proportion as regards the relative importance of the various portions 
of his work, I 1 ne whole of such details as galvanised or tile roofs, 
railings, gateways, etc., should not be drawn but only sufficient to 
show the style proposed. All calculations for applied mechanics 
should be fastened together and full references given in the text to all 
plates. All details necessary to check the calculation should be glVen. 
AH calculations referring to a particular design should run concurrently, 
and be prefaced by a clear statement of the data connected with that 
design, No calculations should be shown on the plates, but the 



STANDING ORDERS. 1$1 

magnitudes of: the forces represented should be clearly shown. No 
marks will be allotted for applied mechanics plates which are not 
accompanied by calculations in the report. The important details in 
drawing, the finished survey, estimate, calculations and report shoujd all 
be completed first. ,Cross references and headings should be carefully 
given so that it may be easy to follow from the report or estimate what 
is being referred to. Any leisure time can then, if desired, be devoted 
to type drawings of well-known details and to generally beautifying, 
cleaning, and elaborating the plates. The cleaning of plates by 
servants or menials is forbidden, 

(5). Discipline and Sanitation. The senior student is responsible 
for the discipline of the camp. He will at once report any authenticated 
case of a breach of the camp regulations, and pending the arrival of 
instructions from the Officer-in-charge of the Civil Engineer Class he 
is empowered to issue such instructions to students or to khalassies as 
he may consider necessary. 

(6). Until a student has finally completed his field work in camp 
he is not permitted to visit Roorkee unless specially authorised to do 
so by the Officer- in-charge of the Civil Engineer Class. If a student, 
on account of absolutely imperative circumstanees, desires to visit 
Roorkee on leave from the Project camp, he must submit a written 
application for leave at least 24 hours before he desires to quit the 
camp, and he is not authorised to proceed on leave until he has 
received the necessary permission. Such leave will only be granted in 
very exceptional cases and on receipt of conclusive evidence that it is 
absolutely necessary. 

(7). Students are not compelled to work on Sundays or on College 
general holidays, but they are allowed to do so. No extension of time 
in camp or in College will be given to such students as observe these 
days as holidays. No work, however, is permitted in the College on 
Sundays after the return from camp, though such days may be utilised, 
of course, for work which is permitted in quarters. 

(8). All students while in camp are to keep a diary showing each 
day tthe hour of leaving camp and the hour of return, the nature and 
extent of the survey or other work executed giving the names of any 
villages or oilier prominent points visited, and any other concise 
information useful to an examiner in checking the progress of the 
work. The diary must always be on the person of the student BO that 



192 ITANDItffl ORDEftS. 

it can be produced at once when demanded, and it must be kept np to 
date and must be written in ink. 

(9). Students should leave camp for work not later than 8-0 A.M. 
daily. 

(10). Every endeavour should be made to avoid giving offence to 
villagers near the camp or elsewhere by needless destruction of crops or 
by other such damage, Pea-fowl must not be shot without permission 
from the local villagers. 

11. Every camping ground is to be kept clean. The second 
senior student will be responsible for the supervision of sanitation under 
the direction of the senior student. Paper, etc., must not be left lying 
about. Fires are not to be lighted outside the limits of the camp or 
near tents. Tins of oil are not to be kept in Government^ tents. 
Lamps must not be placed on tables where there is a danger of the 
tent catching fire. Before a storm all lamps must be extinguished. 

(12). Necessary tents should ne locnted on the side of the camp 
away from the direction from which the prevailing wind blows, and 
should be if possible 100 yards or more from the camp, 

(13). The purity of the water-supply for drinking and cooking 
should be carefully ensured. Drinking water should be boiled before 
use. 'Ihe washing of clothes should not be permitted near a well from 
which the supply of drinking water is drawn, and in the case of a 
stream the washing of clothes must take place down-stream of the 
drinking water site. 

(14). After return to the College students should note that no 
work in their quarters IB permitted during the hours of the usual 
College attendances. Project work is permitted in the College before 
or after the College attendances as well as during them up to 6 P.M. 
For the last fortnight of the Project, if in the month of May, electric 
fans will work till 6 P.M. in the 3rd year class room. 

(15). Students will be responsible for their drawings and original 
survey records which are, on no account., to be taken to their quarters, 
but which must be kept filed in their class room in the almirah set 
aside for this purpose. The issuing officer will stamp all paper issued, 
and each sheet must be immediately signed by the student to whom 
it is issued. 



STANDING ORDERS. 

(16). Tents, Conveyance, etc. Government tents are classified as 
follows :- t - 

E.P. tents to accommodate four students Class I. 

Semi-Swiss Cottage, large, two students Class II. 

,, M / small, one student Class III. 

Shuldaries, large, to accommodate not less than 15 khalassies. 
small, ,, ,, ,, ,, 8 

As the majority of the cla^s consists of Indians, they will be 
accommodated in batches of 4 each in E.P. tents. If there are 3 
Mahomedans they will occupy one E.P. tent, but 2 Mahomedans will 
be accommodated in a Class II tent. 

For example, if the class consists of 

Case /. 13 Hindus and 3 Mahomedans. Then the tents will be 
allotted as follows : 3 tents Class I, 1 tent Class III for the Hindus, 
and 1 tent Class I for the Mahomedans. 

Case //. 14 Hindus and 2 Mahomedans, 3 tents Class 1 and 2 
tents Class II. 

In the case of Europeans, tents of Classes II and III will be avail- 
able according to the above scale. 

There will be one E. P. tent, with drugget, for the Indian Engineer 
Class Club, and one single pole tent each, with drugget, for the 
European and Mahomedan messes, provided that each has three or 
more members. 

Necessary tents are for Indians only. 

Furniture. Each student will be allowed 1 bed, 1 mattress, 1 fold- 
ing chair and 1 folding table (the latter two being camp furniture). 
Club and Mess tents will have collapsible tables. 

(17). One cart per two students will be sanctioned and an allowance 
of two annas per mile per student be given to and from the Project 
camp ; over and above this, students must make their own arrange- 
ments. If the Personal Assistant to the Principal is required to 
obtain carts, etc., three days' notice must be given in writing. For a 
journey which is made partly by rail and partly by road a student will be 
allowed the price of one and a half 2nd Class fares, and 8 annas a 
mile by road, for the journey to and from the Project Camp. The 
distance from the College to Roorkee station is 1| miles. No other 
travelling charges are admissible. 



194 STANDING ORDERS. 

(18). Two dak coolies for the camp, one of whom will report daily 
to ite senior student, will be allowed, provided the camp is within a 
15-mile limit, and three dak coolies for a 20-mile limit. 

(19). An allowance of Re. 1 per mile is sanctioned to each student 
for ihe cost of flags, pegs, etc., subject to a maximum of Rs. 10. 
No other contingency charges are admissible, and this also includes 
such items as stationery, portfolios, etc. 

(20). Students who are unable to finance themselves can, on apply- 
ing in writing to the Principal, receive an advance up to Rs. 50 for 
payment to khalassies. This sum will be deducted from the total of 
the bill on the close of the Project. The success with which students 
manage their coolies and make their camping arrangements will be 
considered in awarding marks for " Fitness for Department." 

(21). Survey Care of instruments, khalassies, etc. One theo- 
doiite, One level, two levelling staves and one ordinary plane-table 
equipment will be issued to each student, each instrument bearing the 
class number of the student. The student will be personally respon- 
sible for these instruments being in adjustment and in good working 
order. Any damage sustained will be made good by the student, and 
he will not be permitted to exchange his instrument or stand with 
another student, and no student will be permitted to lend his instru- 
ment. The damaged instrument with a report must be sent immediately 
to headquarters. 

Students will always accompany their khalassies proceeding to and 
returning from work. In inclement weather instruments should be put 
away in their litotes and the fcbxes protected from rain, sun and dust. 
When an instrtrment is kept standing for some time in the sun, the 
cloth bag should be placed over it for protection. Level staves should 
be clamped together when not in use, and they should not be lekmt 
against walls and trees, but placed horizontally on the ground and 
protected from dew, rain and white ants. 

(22). Except level staves, plane-table stands and chains, ujo instru- 
ment should be carried on carts. The khalassies must be utilised for 
conveying such instruments to the field and back to headquarters. 
Plane-tables may be placed face to face and taken in a spring cart, 
bnt thi$ only when the student himself is travelling with them. With 
reference to the use and care of instruments students should read 
par**. 71 mnd 194, Survey Manual, Part I, 



STANDING ORDERS. 195 

(23). Ttie boundaries of all fields must be surveyed provided thqj 
come within the specified limits of the alignment, submerged area, etc. 
Village boundaries must also be defined ; these are usually shown on 
the guide map or index map issued. Traverse work and triangnlation 
must be based on true north, and the magnetic variation at the time 
should be clearly noted on each map and drawing. Every use should 
be made of embedded stones, plinths of building, etc., an bench-marks 
in levelling even if such objects are to some extent without the limits 
of the work. 

(24), Plane-table sections, note-books, etc., must have the name 
and nural?er of the student clearly written on them. All plane-table 
section^ and records must be kept up to date in ink, and index and 
cross reference wprk should be made in the field. Level and Traverse 
Field-books must be recorded in ink in the field. 

(2*5), If a chain, is used the chain should be checked daily and the 
chain error noted in the field-book. Levels should be tested for adjust- 
ment daily, vide para. 79* Survey Manual, Part. I. 

(26). All calculations for curves, azimuths, etc., should be con- 
tained in the Survey note-book. 

(27). Students will see that as little damage as possible is inflicted 
on standing crops, and if chaining is necessary through such crops the 
chain should be lifted, not dragged, from arrow to arrow. The instru- 
ment should be set up as near as possible to the line of demarcation 
between fields to avoid repeated tramping down of wheat, gram, etc. 

(28). Khalassies will be enlisted at Roorkee, and they will ordinarily 
be entitled to one day's leave per week if the Project is within 12 miles 
of Roorkee, or two days in a fortnight if beyond that limit. The day 
or days for leave is one for the student to arrange. Khalassies will 
receive pay at the prevailing rates for labour, and tindals or chainmen 
(one per squad of 8 men) will, if recommended, receive pay at the 
rate of Re. 1 extra per mensem. Each khalassie can obtain a record 
sheet which will entitle him to prior claim for enlistment for both the 
Triangulation and Project camps. A chainman or tindal on a higher 
rate of pay loses claim to the extra allowance, if he absents himself 
from any of the above camps. A student engaged on independent 
work will, if circumstances allow, have a squad of 5 men, He will not 
be permitteto work with more. 



196 STANDING OEBBBB, 

(29). TourB. Whew proceeding on a tour each student will be 
allowed the price of one 2nd cluss railway fare for any journey by rail, 
and he will make his own arrangements, on this sum, for the transport 
of his personal kit and servants. Each student will also be allowed 
Be. 1 per diem for carriage expenses and Rs. 8 per night if detained 
n a town while on tour, 



WORKSHOP RULES 

56. The punctual attendance of students at Workshop hours is 
essential. 

Workshop Tickets. Every student attending the Workshop course 
will be allotted a special number, On entering the shop every day he 
will be given a corresponding ticket, He will make the ticket over to 
the Foreman Instructor on getting Ins tools, and receive it back when 
he has returned his tools correct at the close of the day's work. 

Work should be carried on until the closing hour has sounded, when 
tools should be cleaned, put away neatly in the proper place, and count- 
ed over to the Foreman On leaving the shops students will give up 
their tickets at the gate. 

57. Each student on joining the shops will provide himself with the 
following tools: 



1 steel L-square. 
1 12-inch steel rule, 



1 outside callipers. 
1 wing compass. 



1 inside callipers. 
He will bring these tools each day be attends the Workshops during 
the course. 

58. At the Workshops students will be under all the College rules 
as regards conduct. Hmoking is strictly prohibited. 

59. Breakages and injuries to tools, machines and Government 
property generally must, in all cases be reported at once to the Lec- 
turer in charge. 

60. Materials for instructional work will be issued to students by 
the Foreman with instructions regarding the work to be done. On 
completion of the work it must be shown to the Lecturer and approved 
before a more advanced exercise can be given. Students are warned 
that the practice of inserting wood chips and shavings in a carpentry 
joint in order to make the joint tight will entail the loss of all marks 
for that particular exercise, 



STANDING ORDERS, 197 

61. Students are prohibited from working at any machine, unless 
specially authorised in this respect by the Lecturer in charge or the 
Foreman of the Shop. 

62. Loose clothing and pupgries may not be worn in the Work- 
shops. 

63. Students must not enter any shop other than that in which 
their class is working, without permission from the Lecturer in charge. 

64. Rules regarding student's independent work in the College shops. 
(1). Every student wishing to do private work must first bring 

to the Lecturer in charge, to be kept by him, a fully di- 
mensioned sketch showing clearly the article he wishes to 
make : the student should also possess a copy for his own 
use. If sanctioned by the Lecturer, the job will be given 
a Workshop number and material issued for it. If the 
student wishes to make any alteration in the original 
design a fresh drawing must be made, and sanctioned by 
the Lecturer in charge. 

(2). All articles being made, and the materials issued, must on no 
account be removed from the Workshop by students, but 
must be left in charge of the Shop Foreman : when any 
article is complete it must be handed over to the Lecturer 
in charge, and if proved satisfactory after examination by 
him, it will be issued to the student who made it. 

(3). No articles made by students in the College Workshop may 
be sold without the Principal's sanction. 

(4). Students can get advice and assistance in their private work 
from the Lecturer in charge and the Shop Foreman, but 
they are held responsible that no assistance is given by 
workmen or others, except those noted above. 

(5). Students who have made specially good progress in their 
work in College in any special subject, will be allowed to 
obtain the permission of the Professor or Lecturer in that 
subject to devote a definite number of the attendances 
laid down for that subject to independent work in the 
Shops. 

(6). Private work must not be done during hours allotted to 
Workshop Practice. 



198 sTAKrmsG ORDERS. 



LABORATORY RULBS. 

General. 
65. Laboratory rules. 

(1), The greatest care must be taken in handling and using all 
apparatu^ ; any breakage or damage which occurs mus^ be 
reported atj onpe to the Professor or Lecturer, Any damage 

of loss resulting from carelessness will be charged to tljie 
student or students responsible for it. This rule also applies 
to all survey instruments. 

f'2). After finishing any experiment, nil parts of apparatus and 
reagent bottles used must be replaced at once in their proper 
positions before leaving the laboratory, the whole apparatus 
being replace^ in its case if such is supplied, In using 
boxes of weights especially, it must be carefully noticed 
that every weight is properly replaced. 

(8). In working, the benches must be kept as clean as possible ; 
stj^djC^tg bej^ng cai;eful to avoid any unnecessary dirt or mess. 

(4)* Students mu;st enter in a laboratory note-book specially kept 
for the purpose details of each experiment performed by 
them during or immediately after its completion. Such 
rougto notea must be reoopied, kept up to date, and be always 
ready for inspection when called for. In the Physical and 
Btastricai Laboratories, after finishing an experiment, students 
must mark it off on the form put up in th laboratory 
for the purpose, 

(5). Students must do all experimental work entirely indepen- 
dently ; all necessary explanations, etc., will be given 
by the Professor or Lecturer. Consultation between 
students is strictly forbidden during experimental work 
except wbeu two or more students are told of together to 
eonciuct an experiment, 

($). All appaxatus, chemicals, etc., are supplied free to students ; 
but any breakage or damage will be. charged to the student 
or students responsible for it, 

(1). Ffoiafco* O/ a# af the Laboratory rules will be punished by 
loss of marks. 



STANDING OKDERS. 1^9 

Chemical Laboratory rules. 

(8). Each student mast provide himself with a rotigh note-book, a 

piece of platinum wire, a duster, padlock and k^y, and a copy 

of each of the prescribed text- books. Keys of the padTocks 

should be labelled, and left with the Lecturer. 

(9). The sinks, benches, floor, and apparatus must be kept dean ; 

all unnecessary dirt and mess is to be scrupulously avoided. 
(10). Students should be careful not to waste chemicals, either by 
spilling them about, or by using unnecessarily large quantities. 
(11). All experiments giving rise to poisonous or obnoxious fumes 

must be perforated in the fume chambers. 

(12). Students are advised, when heating either solids or liquids 
in test-tubes, to direct the n^uths of the lubes towards the 
reagent shelves, in order to prevent any acclddnt occurring 
to their neighbours. 

(13). Students are on ho account to touch the switches regulating 
the ventilation of the fume chambers. 

Laboratory Balance Room rules. 

(14). Students, when weighing, should always place the article to be 
weighed on the scale pan on the left-hand side of the balance, 
and the weights on the rz^t-hand side. 

(15). Chemicals are on no account to be placed directly upon the 
scale pans Chemicals to be weighed should be either 'put 
upon a watch-glass, or placed in a weighing bottle. All 
apparatus to be weighed should be scruputouxfy clean, and 
perfectly dry. 

(16). When weighing, the balance pans should be slowly and 

carefully released. The weights are never to be placed 

upon the scale pan while the balance pfentt are free to S^fiitg. 

(17 ). The weights are on no account to be touched With the fingers 

but should be removed by means of the callipers famished 

with each box of weights. 

(18). During the process of weighing, the weights are to be 
removed, one by one, from the weight-btilc and carefally 
placed upon the balance pan. Weights outfit not be placed 
upon the top of etch other. 



200 STANDING ORDEB8. 

(19). Check the result of each weighing by adding together the 

weights removed from the weight-box ; then carefully 

remove weights from the balance pan. 
(20). All weighings must be carefully recorded in a note-book 

and not on scraps of paper which are liable to be lost. 
(2i). Students, when they have finished weighing, should remove 

the rider from the beam of the balance, see that the balance 

pans are not free to swing, close the balance, replace the 

balance cover, and see that all the weights are correctly 

placed in the weight-box. 
(22). Hot crucibles are on no account to be put upon the balance 

pans. Crucibles should first be allowed to cool in a 

desiccator. 

(23), Apparatus should not be left upon the balance tables. 
(24). Should any of the balances be defective, the matter should 

be reported at once to the Professor or Lecturer. 

Engineering Laboratory rules. 
(25). Preliminary to work in these Laboratories each student 

should become familiar with the operation and mechanism 

of the machine to be used. 
(26;. The accuracy of the machines and instruments depending 

chiefly upon their correct adjustment, students are forbidden 

to tamper with them in any way. 
(27). Steam valves must never be opened except in the presence of 

the Lecturer, Serious accidents have happened in the past 

through non-observance of this rule. 
(28). In framing reports of tests, attention should be paid to 

clearness and order of statement, legibility of writing and 

neatness. 

(29). Reports of tests will be submitted on the day following that 
on which the test was made. The report, with any correc- 
tions, will be returned to the student, after checking, on 
the student's next attendance at the laboratory. 

Survey Laboratory Rule. 
(80), The greatest care must be taken in handling and using all 

Survey Instruments : any breakage or damage which occurs 

must be reported at once to the Professor or Lecturer. A 



STANDING ORDKRg. 201 

student is personally responsible for any instrument issued 
to him, and when kept by him in his quarters he should see 
that it is put in a safe place and not where it is likely to be 
knocked over by his servant in cleaning up the room. No 
instrument should be left unattended in the field. In going 
to, or returning from work in the field students (except Civil 
Engineer Class , Third Year) must, on no account, hand 
their instruments over to servants to carry. Any damage 
done to an instrument must be made good by the student 
to whom the instrument was issued, and, in the case where 
students are working in parties, the cost will be divided 
among the members of the party unless it can be shown 
clearly that one or other of the party was directly responsible 
for the damage done. In addition to having to pay for 
the damage caused, the student or students will have marks 
deducted either from their " Fitness for department " or 
' Survey " groups or from both. 



COLLEGE OFFICE. 

66. (1). Students are strictly prohibited from entering the College 
office rooms. Any work which they may have with the office should 
be -transacted over the counters or by standing before the outer doors 
of the College office rooms. 

(2). All payments by students for rent, fees, subscriptions, 
Stores bills, etc., must be made at the counter of the College Office 
between the hours of 10 A.M. to 1 P.M., and 2 P,M, to 3 P.M. 

(3). The payment will be entered in a register kept by the 
Cashier. This entry will be initialled by the student at the time of pay- 
ment, and this initial will signify that the entry is correct. No receipt 
will be given except for special reasons. Every payment must be made 
by the individual concerned in person. 



COLLEGE BOOK DEPOT. 

67. (1). Students are not permitted to cross the counter, or to 
touch any article in the Book Dep6t. The Curator will supply them 
with anything they may require. 

(2). Smoking in the Book Depot is strictly prohibited (010 rule 10). 



20$ STANDING OBDIB*. 

($). Books, etc,, once issued from ihe Book Dep&t to students, 
will not be taken back or exchanged, except by special permission of 
th Principal. 

(4). The deposits laid down in the Calendar must be paid 
into the College Treasury by students before books, etc., can be issued 
to them on credit. 

(5). Articles will be issued to students from the Book Depot 
from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M., except on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 
and Fridays in the 1st Term when they will be issued only from I P.M. 
to 2 P.M. 

(6). A list of books, with prices against them, is hung in the 
Book Depot and is in the Circular of each class for the information of 
students. Students are, therefore, directed to pay the Curator the 
exact amount of the price of the book or books they want to purchase, 
as change is not always available in the Book Depot. 

(7). Students are warned that in till dealings with the Curator 
they must comport themselves in a proper manner. 



COLLEGE LIBRARY RULES. 

88. (l). Certain works of reference can only be consulted in the 
liikrarj ahi Reading- room, and may not be removed from these rooms 
without special sanction from the Principal. 

(2). No book will be issued on loan from the Library until a 
sighed receipt for the same has been handed to the Librarian; this 
?(&eeijpfc will be returned when the book is given back. 

(8). Books are liable to be recalled at any time by the Librarian. 

'(4). Tne transfer of books on loan is prohibited. 

(5). Students making use of the Library are forbidden to re- 
moVe boots from the shelves. The Librarian on being informed of 
tlieir catalogue number will supply any book required. 

(6). The Library will be closed annually to the issue of books 
from the 5th to the 15th July. All books out on loan on the 5th of 
July must be returned SVfore t&e 7th. 

(7). Persons damaging or losing books will be charged with 
the value of the same. The practice of marking or scribbling in books, 
or of removing illustrations, is strictly prohibited [see also Rule 68 
(11) footnote]. 



LANDING ORDERS. 

(8). Persons infringing these rules arc liable to be denied ike 
use of the Library. 

(9). The Library is open daily during the College Session, 
Sundays and holidays excepted, for the issue and return of books from 
II A.M. to 12 noon and from 2 P.M. to 3 P.M. during the second term 
and during the same hours on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the session. On Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays in the 
first term the Library is open from 11 A.M. to * P.M. but attendance at 

the Library should not be allowed to interfere with College attendances 

" i M 
or work, and books must be returned or issued between 1 P.M. and 

2 P.M. During the Vacation the Library is open on Thursdays from 11 
A.M. to 1 P.M. The Reading-rooms are available for reference purposes 
during the College Session from 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. daily, except on 
Sundays and holidays. 

(10). Class books, as shown in the College Calendar, are 

v ' , . ,'*? .r JM ;[.t* 

issued to students for a period 'not exceeding three months, but no 

* - i . t r -,,;(.',;; $i t 

other text-book on the Book Depot list will be issued to students from 

r t ] i 1 i''j'i * To 

the Library. 

(11). In addition to Class books, students are entitled to 
keep books* on loan up to the limit laid down for the different classes, 
but no book may be retained for a longer period than a fortnight. 

(12). On return from the field work of the Project, till the 
completion of Project, the length of time during which a book my 
be retained by a member of the Third Year Engineer Glass will be 
three days only. The re-issue of these books will only be made on the 
recommendation of the Professor of Civil Engineering. 

(13). Applications from students for scientific works which 
have been issued will be registered by the Librarian, and on the return 
of the books they will be issued to the applicants in the order of 
priority of their applications. 

(14). During the Vacation students will be permitted to take 
books on loan from the Library under rule (13) on obtaining special 
permission from the Principal. Application from students to the 

* In future students taking books containing Plates from the Library must personalty chad* th* 
number of Plates and note it on the receipt; the Plates to be again check*! when tha book fe 
returned. 



204 STANDING OJRD8RS. 

Principal must be countersigned by the Officer-in-charge of the Class, 
and all such applications must be submitted by the 3rd July. No 
applications will be considered after that date. Applicants will attend 
at the Library immediately after the Convocation when they will receive 
their books if sanctioned. Only technical books will be issued and not 
more than three books of any one section to each student. 



COLLEGE DAIRY 

69. All European students are to obtain milk and butter from 
the College Dairy, and from no other source. This Dairy is main- 
tained for the good of their health, and students are earnestly requested 
to see that their servants do not supply milk or butter from outside 
sources, and by this means endanger the health and even risk the lives 
of students. Any servant detected supplying milk or butter to European 
students from outside sources will he expelled from the College lines, 
and students will be held responsible that their servants are informed 
of this fact. Butter and milk may be paid for through the Dairy bills, 



SUBSCRIPTION TO PRIVATE FUNDS. 

70. (i). Students are required to subscribe the following 
donations at the beginning of each session to the Sports and Regatta 
Funds of the College : 

Engineer Class ... ... Rs 3 a year. 

Overseer Class ... ... 1 ,, 

Draftsman Class ... ... As. 8 ,, 

(ii). Students are required to join the various clubs of the 
College of their respective classes as specified below, with the rate of 
subscriptions at present in force. 

Civil Engineer Class. 



s. For European and Anglo-Indian students. Donation Rs. 
10 a year from the first and second year students ; subscription 
Rs. 1 5 a month, and messing charge of one rupee and six annas per 
diem during the Sessions. (N.B. The messing charge may be higher 
if the numbers are few). 



STANDING ORDERS. 205 

Club for Indian students Donation Rs. 10 a year for the first 
and second year students ; and subscription Rs. 10 a month for first 
second and third year students, during the Sessions. 

Overseer Class. 

All students of the Overseer Class are eligible to join the Overseer 
Class Reading Club on payment of a monthly subscription of Annas 
12 during their period of residence. 

All Overseer Class students are expected to join the Overseer Class 
Recreation Club. A donation of Re. 1 is to be made by each student 
at the commencement of every session to the College Sports Fund, 
The subscription to the Overseer Class Recreation Club is fixed at 
Rupees 2 per mensem, per student, payable for nine months only. 
All the usual games will be available for Overseer Class students for 
this subscription excluding the use of boats. 



SPECIAL RULES. 



Civil Engineer Class. 

.71. All European students of this Class are expected to attend 
Divine service once every Sunday at their own place of worship. 

72. Indian students will make their own arrangements for messing. 

73. Students are not to enter Recreation Club Boats till they have 
qualified in swimming. 



RULES FOR THE EUROPEAN C. E, CLASS STUDENTS 9 

MESS. 

74. (I). This mess was established in January, 1869. All Euro- 
pean Civil Engineer Class students must join it, except 
such as obtain special permission from the Principal 
to live with friends or relatives in Roorkee. Such 
permission is exceptional as it is desirable that all 
European student* should have their meals in the Mess, 



STANDING OBDER8. 

(II). The management of the Mess is entrusted to a Committee 
composed of the Officer- in-charge, acting as President, 
and four students, two of whom shall be elected from 
the first year, one from the second year, and one from 
the third year students. As soon as possible after the 
commencement of the Session one of the Committee 
members shall be detailed to act as Mess Secretary, and 
shall be provided with quarters in the Mess. 

(Ill), A general Mess meeting can only be called with the 
consent of the Principal. 

(IV). The rates of subscription, etc., nave been fixed as follows 

subject to alteration at the discretion of the President^- 

Entrance Donation. Rs, 20 (to be paid in two ins^al- 

ments, half on joining the College and half at the 

commencement of the Second Year's Course of Study). 

Monthly Subscription About Rs. 15. For details, see 
Circular. 

Messing. One rupee six annas per diem* (including 
breakfast, lunch and dinner). The above items are 
charged in the monthly Mess Bill. 

(V), Liquor and extra English stores will be paid for monthly 
by cash payments, which must be settled before the 
21st of the month following that to which they relate, 
excepting at the end of each Session, w^en the bills 
must be settled before the Mess is closed. Students 
are reminded that, at the end of the final Session, 
certificates are withheld from all students who have 
failed to settle all College accounts. 

(VI). The charge for messing must be settled (in the College 
Office) not later than the 21st of the month to which it 
relates. All extras are to be settled by the 21st of the 
following month, except in the last month of the term 
when all accounts must be settled before a student 
leaves the College. Students are reminded that any 

* This rate may be increased if there are very few members in the Mess. 



STANDING ORDERS. 207 

student in arrears with his account on the first day of 
each month will lose all marks for all examinations that 
may occur between that date and the day on which his 
account is settled (vide printed memo, on expenses). 
(VIT). All regular members of the Mess will pay their daily 
messing whether they be present at the Mess or not, 
unless absent on duty, or for more than three days on 
account of sickness. Periods of leave over three days 
will be specially considered by the President. 

N.B. No exemption from payment can be admitted unless due 
notice has been given to the Khanxamah. 

(VIII). Students who have permission to live with friends or 
relatives in Roorkee and do not make daily use of the 
Mess will pay the donation, but no monthly subscription, 
and they will pay for messing as follows : For dinner, 
12 annas ; lunch, 5 annas ; breakfast, 7 annas.* 
(IX). Members inviting guests will pay for their messing at the 
rates fixed iu Rule VIII ; also passed students who 
may make use of the Mess during a visit. 

(X). As dinner will only be provided for the number of regular 
dinners, any non-dining member wishing to dine, or a 
member who has invited a guest, must give proper notice 
before 2 o'clock on the day on which he wishes dinner 
to be provided. Such notice having been given cannot 
be withdrawn after 2 o'clock on the day referred to. 
(XI). No invitations to Mess parties or entertainments are to be 
issued in the name of the mess as a body without the 
sanction of the President. This does not preclude in- 
dividual members from inviting private guest^. 
(XII). The Mess property and furniture of every kind belongs to 
the College, and no individual member has any share in it. 

(XIII). Any damage done to Mess property must be reported to 
the Mess Secretary, who will bring the matter to the 
notice of the President with a view to assessment. 

(XIV). The Mess plate, crockery, and cutlery cannot be made 
use of by individual members outside the Mess, neither 
can provisions be taken from the Mess to students' 
*Theie charges may be increased if there are very few members. ' 



208 



STANDING ORDERS, 



quarters excepting for members who have been reported 
sick by the medical officer. These members must send 
their own servants and crockery for what they ' require. 

(XV). The lending of Mess property for purposes of College 
entertainments, such as cricket, lunches, etc., and the 
granting of the services of the Khansamah or other 
Mess servants for any purpose whatever other than 
their proper employment in the Mess, is left to the 
discretion of the Mess President without whose sanction 
no Mess servant can be employed or Mess property 
used outside the Mess. 

(XVI) Stores for the Mess are to be ordered by the Secretary 
only, as occasion may arise, with the sanction of the 
Mess Committee, who are responsible that actual 
requirements are not exceeded. Any stores ordered 
from any place, except Messrs. Murray and Co., 
Iloorkee, must have the special sanction of the Mess 
President. No stores may be purchased in the bazaar 
on any pretext whatever. 

(XVII). The following Mess servants will be regularly maintain- 
ed, viz., a Khansamah, a bearer, and a khidmatgar, 
sweeper and bhisti. The latter three will be on 
half-time employment at half wages. These wage? 
will be discharged by the Mess together with other 
incidental expenses, such as lighting of rooms, washing 
of table linen, etc. No other expenses can be incurred 
without the sanction of the Mess Committee. 

(XVIII). Members must keep their own table servants at the rate 
of at least one khidmatyar to every two students. 
These private servants must be considered as under the 
orders of the khansamah during the time they are on 
the Mess premises, and will be expected to help 
generally with the table work. 

(XIX) Any one striking or ill treating a servant within the Mess 
premises is to be reported at once to the Mess President. 

(XX) No private servant or property may be kept permanently 
on the Mess premises without the special sanction of 
the President. 



STANDING ORD1RS. 



209 



(XXI). 



(XXII). 

(XXIII) 
(XXIV). 



(XXV). 



A book will be kept in which any complaints can be re- 
corded by individual members. These will be attended 
to by the Mess Committee, but students should bear in 
mind, when making complaints, that the tariff has been 
fixed at the lowest rate possible. Any flagrant abuse 
of the privilege will result in the complaint book being 
removed. 

Breakfast and dinner will only be provided at fixed hours 
to be notified by the Mess Committee. It is only by 
adhering strictly to this arrangement that a tariff as 
low as that fixed can be maintained. 
The senior student present will be held responsible for the 
preservation of order, and for bringing to the notice of 
the Committee any infraction of this rule. 
The Secretary is responsible for the cleanliness of the 
cook-house. He is to visit it daily and see 
(I). That the cooking utensils are clean ; 

That clean jharans are issued daily and the dirty 

ones taken back ; 
That no articles of food are kept in the living 

room attached to the cook-house ; 
That all work is done in the cook house and on 

the tables provided ; 

That any meat such as pork, bacon, liver, etc., 
which the Mess Secretary wishes inspected, is 
sent to the College Medical Officer who will 
stamp the meat, if good. 

The Mess Secretary is to report weekly to the 
Officer-in-cbarge that he has carried out these 
orders. 

The Mess is not to be kept open later than 9 P.M. during 
the winter term and 1 P.M. during the summer term 
without special sanction from the President. 



(2). 
(3). 

(*) 
(5). 



RULES FOR THE INDIAN ENGINEER CLASS CLUB. 

75. (a). All Indian students who are eligible should subscribe to 
the Indian Engineer Class Club, 



MO f*A'lrmM ORDBHfi. 

(5). TKe rtWn%etrientt of the dub i& tifttta'sted to- # CoiMirfee of 
Meiers, one of whom shall be elected Honorary Secretary. This 
Co&mittee will be elected at a general meeting at the beginning of each 
yeAr, subject to the approval of the President. 

(c), The committee will draw up a lint of rules for the management 
4md welfare of the club, and make rt commendations for expenditure, 

These rules and recommendations must be submitted for the sanction 
of the President who will have direct control over all matters relating 
to the club. 

(d). All members will pay an entrance donation of Rs. 15 which 
is payable in instalments of Us. 5 a year; and a monthly subscription 
of Rs. 3 while in residence. The accounts and cash will be kept 
in the College Treasury. The cashier will make disbursements on the 
order of the Officer-in-charge Civil Engineer Class. 

(e). Any damage to furniture, the property of the College, will be 
assessed by the Personal Assistant to the Principal when the President 
with the Principal's approval will direct that the amount be recovered 
from the student. 

*/6, Indian Overseer Class students will make their own arrange- 
ments for messing. 



Or 

o 

fc. 



c 
o 



f.- 



T3 

c 

CO 



' : 









a> 
a> 



x: 
o 

I 






Or 

a 
o 



TBARLY LIST* fit 



YEARLY LISTS OF STUDENTS WHO HAVE 
PASSED OUT OF THE COLLEGE FROM 
1925 INCLUSIVE. (FOR LISTS DATING 
BACK TO 1910 INCLUSIVE SEE GALEN- 
DAR FOR 1928, FOR LISTS TO 1890 SEE 
CALENDAR FOR 1925, FOR LISTS TO 
1875 SEE CALENDAR FOR 1922), AND FOR 
LISTS TO 1848 SEE CALENDAR FOR 1910. 



YEARLY LHT. 



218 



192S. 



No, 


* 
Name. 


Ranks and Corps, and 
where educated, 


Marks 1 
gained. 1 


1 

o 

I 


Remarks, 




CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, BUD YEAR. 










(Full Mark* 7R80). 








I 


Ghananand Pande, 


Muir Central College. 


MOT 


81 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




B.se. 


Allahabad. 






Engineer. Council of India 












Prize of Rs. 1,000 for General 












Proficiency. Thomason Prize 












of RR. 250 for best Indian 












student obtaining Higher 












Certificate. Cautley Memo- 












rail Gold Medal for Mathema- 












tics. Silver Medal for Des- 












criptive Engineering, Elec- 












trical Engineering and Phy- 












sics, and Mechanical En- 












gineering, Sir Harcourt But- 












ler's Cup for study and Ath- 












letics combined. 


2 


Ram Krishna Das 


Agra College. Agra. 


5990 


77 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




Jain. 








Engineer. Rai Bahadur 












Kanhya Lai Gold Medal for 












best Indian Student who does 












not obtain Thomason Prize 












Silver Medal for Surveying. 


3 


Kamta Prasad Musli- 


Government Hi eh School, 


5918 


76 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




ran, 


Allahabad. 






Engineer. Silver Medal for 












Drawing. 


4 


Baij Nath Khattri. 


Central Hindu College, 


5914 


76 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




B.SC. 


Benares. 






Engineer. 


5 


Abdul Sattar Faruqui, 


Canning College, Lucknow 


5838 


75 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. Thomason Me- 












morial Gold Medal for beit 












Engineering Design. 


6 


Niranjan Prasad 


Muir Central College, 


5758 


74 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




Goyal. 


Allahabad. 






Engineer. Calcott Reilly 












Memorial Gold Medal for 












Applied Mechanics. , Silver 












Medal for Laboratory Prac- 












tice. Sushila and J. Mlttra 












Memorial Silver Medal for 












Chemistry, 


7 


A jit Singh Malhotra, 


Mohindra College, Patiala 


5708 


73 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 












Engineer. 


8 


MahbubllahiCharagh 


[ovt, College, Lahore, ... 


5675 


73 


Ditto. 



214 



ttC4*LY 



No. 





Rmfc and Corps, a*d 
where educated. 


Marks 3 
gained. '\ 


Per cent. J| 


Remark* 


9 


Gurbachan Singh ... 


Govt. College, Lahore ,,. 


5618 


72 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 


10 


Pas Raj Mehta, p. A. 


D. A.-V. College, Lahore 


5611 


72 


Ditto. 


11 


frayag Narain, B.fic. 


Govt. High School, Bu- 
landshahr. 


5519 


71 


Ditto. 


12 


Bishan S^arup Ma- 


Govt. High School, AH- 
garh. 


5367 


6 


Ditto. 


18 


anti Chandra Sinha 


Muir Central College, 
Allahabad. 


5839 


68 


Ditto. 


14 


Had Lai Sally, B.A. ... 


D. A.-V. College, Lahore 


5189 


66 


Ditto. 


16 


Fanua Lai Malhotra... 


Govt. College Lahore ... 


5147 


66 


Ordinary Certificate as Auis* 
taut Engineer. 


M 


Anant Ham Talwar, 

B.A, 


D. A.-V College, Lahore 


5189 


66 


Ditto. 


If 


Sohan Lai Najar, R.A. 


St. Stephen's Mission 
College. Delhi. 


5014 


64 


Ditto. 


18 


Hans Raj Gupta 


Govt. College. Lahore ... 


4981 


64 


Ditto. 


19 


Lai Oh and Kapoor . 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


4808 


61 


Ditto. 


20 


Jagat Narain Mehra, 


Govt. High School, Ba- 
reilly. 


4700 


60 


Ditto. 


21 


Madhab Singh Bisht 


St. Joseph's College, 
Nairn Tal. 


4682 


60 


Ditto. 


V 


Clifton Lionel Vincent 
Fratijcfe. 


St. Joseph's College, 
Naini Tal. 


4654 


59 


Ditto. 


23 


LaJ^hman Swarup ... 


C. M- High School, 
Meerut. 


4636 


59 


Ditto. 


ft- 


4-rjan Re? Khanim, 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


4509 


58 


Ditto. 


W 


Bh^anD*. ... 


Dayal Singh College, 
Lahore. 


4359 


56 


Ditto. 


* 


J,ame Victor Stuart 
Edwards. 


St. George's College, . 
Muflsoorie. 


4330 


55 


Ditto. 



Lrtf. 

IMs. 



No, 


Names. 


Rank and Corps, And 
where Educated. 


i Marks 1 
gained. 1 


[ Per cent. I. 


Renlarks. 




OVERSEER CLASS, SECOND YEAR. 










(Full Marks, 7000). 








1 


Gftindan Lai Mital ... 


J. A. S. High School, 


5526 


79 


Higher Cet tiffcate as Overseer. 






Khurja. 






Silver Medal and Rs 100 for 












General Merit. Rai &a!hadur 












Kanhya Lai Silver Medal for 












best Indian Student. Silver 












Medal for Drawing. Durga 












Das Dntt Silver Medal for 












best Indian Student obtain- 












ing Higher Certificate. 


2 


Fai Narain (Jodhpur 
State) 


Jaswant College, Jodhpur 


5523 


79 


higher Certificate as Overseer. 
Silver Medal for Descriptive 












Engineering. Rai Bahadur 












Kanhya Lai Silver Medal for 












2nd Indian Student. Sulli- 












van Memorial Medal for 












Mechanics. Silver Medal for 












Workshops. 


8 


JituMalGftrg 


Govt. High School, Mu- 
zaffarnagar. 


5469 


78 


ligher Certificate as Overseer. 
Silver Medal for Elementary 












Mathematics. 


4 


Nand Lai 


High School ,Payal ,., 


5446 


78 


Higher Certificate as Overseer. 
Silver Medal for Surveying. 


5 


Dm Prakash 


D, N. High School, 


5383 


77 


:ligher Certificate afs Overseer. 






Meerut. 






Fairley Memorial! Silver 













Medal for Applied Mechanics, 
Keay Memorial Silver Medal 












and HH 18 for Estimating. 












Silver Medal for Accounts. 


6 


Muiishi Lai Sangal ,.. 


D. N. High School, 
Meerut. 


5175 


74 


Higher Certificate as OYersUer. 
Silver Medal for Photo, and 












ferrotype. 


7 


Jai Prakash 


D. A.-V, High School, 


5153 


74 


Higher Certificate as Overseer. 






Multan. 








8 


&tilft*h Chandra Mital 


Gott. High School, Mu- 


5099 


73 


Ditto. 






zaffarnagar. 








9 


Teja Singh Grewal ... 


S. B. B. 9. K. High 


4976 


71 


Ordinary Certificate as Overllfr. 






School, Lahore. 








10 


Bhagwat Prasad 


Meerut College, Meerut 


4973 


71 


Higher Certificate as Overseer. 


11 


Dal Chand 


Govt. High School, Bijnor 


4969 


71 


Ditto, 


12 


Ram Sarup 


Meerut College, Meerut 


4955 


71 


Ditto. 



216 



1925. 







Rank and Corps, and 


11 


a 
8 









where educated. 


il 


1 




13 


Vishweshwar Dayal 


A. V. High School, Sikandarabad. 


4943 


71 


Higher Certificate as 




Mital. 








Overseer. 


14 


Mahabir Prasad Jaini 


Govt. High School, MuzafTarnagar ... 


4837 


69 


Ditto. 


15 


Vachae Pati 


Ditto, ditto 


4771 


68 


Ditto. 


16 


Har Narain Panday, 


Jaswant College. Jodhpur 


4765 


68 


Ditto. 




(Jodhpur State). 










17 


Raghunath Prasad 


A. V. High School, Sikandarabad ... 


4750 


68 


Ditto. 




Gupta. 










18 


Babu Ram Rajvanshi 


Govt. High School, Meerut 


4741 


68 


Ditto. 


19 


Cyan Cham) Bajal 


Meerut College, Meerut 


4719 


67 


Ditto. 


20 


Janardan Das Mithal 


Govt. High School, Meerut 


4589 


66 


Ditto. 


21 


Ram Krishna 


Govt. C. High School, Roorkee ... 


4549 


65 


Ditto. 


22 


Jai Singh 


Ditto, ditto 


4521 


6.) 


Ditto. 


23 


Chandrika Prasad 


Govi. High School, Bulandshahr ... 


4511 


64 


Ditto, 




Mathur. 










24 


Jado Ram 


Govt, High School, Muzaffarnagar 


4511 


64 


Ditto, 


25 


Braj Nath 


Govt. High School, Bijnor 


4479 


(14 


Ordinary Certificate 










aa Overseer. 


26 


Kesbo Ram 


D. N. High School, Meerut 


4438 


63 


Higher Certificate as 












Overseer. 


27 


Jagmohan Lai 


Govt. C. 0. High School, Roorkee ... 


4432 


63 


Ordinary Certificate 












as Overseer, 


28 


Basdeo Sahai Sharma 


St. John's High School, Agra 


4307 


62 


Higher Certificate ai 












Overseer. 


29 


Banwari Lai Singhal i 


J. A. S. High School, Khurja 


*335 


61 


Ordinary Certificate 












as Overseer. 


30 


Mitra Sain Gupta 


D. N. High School, Meerut 


4163 


59 


Ditto, 


31 


Bishwambher Daynl 


A. V. High School, Sikandarabad ... 


4162 


59 


Ditto. 




Gupta. 










32 


Ram Chandra Seth 


Govt. High School, Arnroha 


4157 


^9 


Ditto. 


38 


Har Prasad Gupta 


J. P. A. S. High School, Khurja ... 


4 1 40 


59 


Ditto. 


34 


Shiv Charan Das 


Got't. High School, Bulandshahr . 


4123 


59 


Ditto. 




Agarwal. 










as 


Om Prakash Goyal 


Govt. C. 0. High School, Roorkee ... 


3982 


57 


Ditto. 


.46 


Sita Ram 


Radhaswami Educational Institute, 


3966 


57 


Ditto, 






Agra. 








37 


Paran Mai Mital 


D.J. High School, Baraut 


3954 


56 


Ditto. 


38 


Ajit Prasad Jain 


D. N. High School, Meerut 


3937 


56 


Ditto. 


39 


Joti Prasad Mital 


D. J. High School, Baraut 


3919 


56 


Ditto. 


40 


Muushi Lai Jain 


Private 


378> 


54 


Ditto. 


41 


Jagnandan Dayal Goel 


Govt. C. 0. High School, Roorkee ... 


3718 


53 


Ditto. 


No. 


Names> , Remarks. 




DRAFTSMAN CLASS, 3KB YEAR. 


1 


Samuel Chhidda ... Certificate as Draftsman. Prize for General Merit 


2 


Ayub AH Khan ... Certificate as Draftsman 


8 


Jagdish Pershad ... Iriwu. 


4 


Rashid-ul-Haq ... Ditto. 


5 


Shiam Bihari Lai ... ( p * t add" October IQ2fl 


6 


Raghbir Singh ... 1 er a 



217 



1926. 



No, 


Names 


Rank and Corps, and 
whore educated. 


S.S 


a 

u 

I 


Remarks. 




CIVIL ENGINEE 


B CLASS, 3RD YEAR. 










(Full Marks 7820). 








1 


Sardari Lai Kumar ... 


Govt College, Lahore 


5947 


76 


Higher certificate as Assistant 












Engineer. Council of India 












Prize of RH. 1,000 for General 












Proficiency. Thomason Prize 












of Rs. 250 for beet Indian 












student obtaining Higher 












Certificate. Cautley Memo- 












rial Gold Medal for Mathema- 












tics. Silver Medal or Des- 












criptive Engineering and 












Surveying. General 












Maclagan's prize of books 












for Electrical Engineering 












and PhysicH. Silver Medal 












for Photo, and Ferrotype. 


2 


Lakshman Prasad 


Govt. High School, Bu- 


6862 


75 


Signer certificate as Assistant 




Bhargava, B Be. 


landshahr. 






Engineer. Rai Bahadur 












Kanhya Lai Gold Medal for 












best Indian student who does 












not obtain Thomason prize. 












Thomason Memorial Gold 












Medal for best Engineering 












Design. Calcott-Rcilly Me- 












morial Gold Medal lor Ap- 












plied Mechanics. Sushila and 












J. Mitra Memorial Silver 












Medal for bent Indian student 












who obtains highest marks in 












Chemistry. 


3 


Mohan Lai ttatra, B.A. 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


5800 


74 


higher certificate as Assistant 












Engineer. 


4 


Ajit Singh Kalha ... 


La Martiniere College, 


5728 


73 


higher certificate as Assistant 






Lucknow. 






Engineer. Silver Medals for 












Mechanical Engineering and 












Laboratory Practice. 


5 


8. Mufid Hasan. B.c. 


Govt. High School 


3703 


73 


] 


6 
7 


Niranjan Das .Gulhati 
Nar Singh Das Kapur 


Fyzabad. 
Govt. College, Lahore 
Govt. High School, Lyall. 


->5B7 
5352 


71 

68 


(Higher certificate as Assistant 
/" Engineer. 






pur. 






) 


8 


Cecil Arthur Browne 


St. Joseph's College, 
Naini Tal. 


5309 


68 


Higher certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. Silver Medal for 












Drawing. Sir Harcourt But- 












ler's Cup for Study and 












Athletics Combined. 



218 



YEARLY LIST. 
1926, 



No. 


Names. 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


2*3 
S.S 

S 

^ bo 


j Per cent. I 


Remarks. * 


9 
10 
11 
12 


Zahid Hasan Khan ... 
Rup Chand ^ood 
Mohammed Zubair, 

B.A. 

Anrnr Nath Malhotra 


Muslim University, Ali- 
garh. 
G-ovt. College, Lahore ... 

Govt. College, Lahore ... 
Govt. College, Lahore ... 


5291 

6287 
5209 
5176 


68 

68 
67 

(16 


1 

)Higher certificate ns Assistant 
Engineer. 

j 


13 


Diwfin Chaml Shanna 


1). A.-V. College, Lahore 


5HO 


06 


i 


14 


Dwarka P rasa d Nayur 


Govt. College. Ludhiana 


5136 


60 




15 


Vidya Prakash Sethi, 
B.A. 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


5092 


65 




in 


Vladau Mohan Lai. 
B.A. 


Govt. College, Lahore 


.'083 


05 




17 


KriHlmn Murari Ajira- 
wrJ, H.SC 


Canning College, Luck- 
now. 


5012 


64 




18 


Gopal Kishore Agra- 
waJ. 


Canning Tollege, Lurk- 
now. 


4987 


fi4 




19 


Ainar Nath Cliuni ... 


Govt, College, Lahore .. 


4956 


63 




20 


Khunhi Ham Kharma 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


4922 


63 




21 
22 
23 


Bir Sain Taiwan! 
Vidya Ratna Goiawnrp 

A jit Prasdd Bagchi, 
B.sr. 


Forman Christian College, 
Lahore. 
S. D. High School, 
Lahore. 
St. John's College, Agra 


4891 
4734 
4690 


63 
61 
60 


j. Ordinary certiticHtc as Asl- 
ant Kngineci. 


24 


Dev Raj Bhambri ... 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


4672 


60 




25 
26 


Surya .lung- Thapa 
(Nepal State). 
Willinm Frederic 
Charles Martin. 


St. Joseph'^ College, 
Naini Tal. 


4007 
4589 


59 
59 




27 

28 


Jyotsna Kumar Koy ... 
Rain ("hand Kinrn ... 


Canning College, Luck- 
now. 
D. A.-V. College, Lahore 


4490 
447! 


58 
57 




29 
30 


B ha wan Sin^h Bisht 

Nageshwari Sahai 
BiRarin. 


St. George's College, 
Mussoorie. 
Agra College, Agra ... 


4419 
4153 


57 
53 


J 



YK.VHU UHT. 
1916 



219 



No. 





Kauk and Corp:., and 


f TJ 
S 





Remarks. 






where educated. 




|H 










*s 


& 






OVEKSEEE CLAS>t<. SECOND YEAH 










(Full Mark* 7000). 








1 


Dharam Raj Bharad- 


Govt. High School, Sita- 


5141 


73 


Higher certificate as Ovwseer. 




waj. 


pur. 






Silver Medal and Rs. 100 






r 






for General Merit. Uai 












Bahadur Kanhya Lai's Sil- 












ver Medal for best Indian 












student. Durpa Das Dutt 












Silver Medal for best Indian 












student obcaining Higher 












certificate. 





Kaljau BUJL Mathur. 


Govt. Hig'h Schuol, Ajmer 


5140 


73 


Higher certificate as Overseer. 
Fair ley Memorial Silver 












Medal for Applied Mecha- 












nics. Silver Medal for des- 












criptive Engineering. Kai 












Bahadur Kanhayt Lai's Sil- 












ver Medal for 2nd Indian 












student Sullivan Memorial 












Silver Medal for Mechanics. 












Keay Memorial Silver Medal 












and Rti. 18 for Estimating. 










Silver Medal for Accounts. 


3 


Hewa Ram, 


Govt. High School. 5079 


73 


Higher certificate aw Overseer, 






Mtizaifarriagar. 






Silver Medal for Elementary 












Mathematics. 


4 


Murari Lai. 


N. R. E. C. Intermediate 


5025 


72 


Higher certificate HH Overseer. 






College, Khurja. 








5 


Jamuna Prasad Guvila, 


M. A. 0, College, Ali- 


4948 


71 


Higher certificate a Overseer. 






garh. 






Silver Medals for Surveying 










and Drawing. 


6 


Satyavrat Sharma. 


St. John's College, Agra 


4761 ! 68 


higher certificate as Overseer. 


7 


3hiv Charan 1 )at 


N. R. E. C. Intermediate 


4755 


68 


Higher certificate ah Overseer, 




Gupta. 


College, Khurja. 






Silvei Medal for Workuhupii. 


s 


Maugat Singh Giri. 


Govt. High School, 


4750 


68 


ligher certificate ax < )verseer. 






Muzaffarnagar. 








( j 


Jiwa Shankur Saluena 


GoTt. Intermediate Col- 


4694 


67 


Ditto. 






lege, Fyzabad. 








10 


Niranjan Singh. 


Govt. High School, Am- 
balla City. 


4681 


6T 


Higher certificate aw Overseer. 
Silver Medal for JMioto. and 












Ferrotype. 


11 


Chhajju Mai. 


Govt. High School, 


4655 


67 


Eli g her certificate an Overseer, 






Meerut. 









880 



YKAHL.Y LIST, 
1926. 



No. 


Name* 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


Marks I 
gained. 1 


1 


Remarks. 


12 


iharat Narain A gar- 


Govt. High School, Bare- 


4617 


66 


ligher certificate as Overseer. 




wal, 


illy. 








13 


jhhotey Lai. 


I). N. H. School, Meerut 


4597 


6 


Ditto. 


14 


adho Ham Vaish- 


Govt. C.O. High School, 


4591 


66 


Ditto. 






Hoorkee. 








15 


Mmal Prasad Jain. 


C. \\. High School, 


4676 


65 


Ditto. 






Meerut. 








16 


Chi ran ji Lai. 


Radha Swami Institute, 


4566 


65 


Ditto. 






Agra. 








17 


Babu Lai Gupta 


N. II. E C. Intermediate 


4411 


63 


Ditto. 






College, Khurja. 








18 


Judh Sen. 


Do. do. ... 


4392 


63 


Ditto. 


19 


klohan Lai 


Durbar High School, 


4340 


"i> 


Ditto. 






Jodhpur. 








20 


Salig Ram. 


Govt. Intermediate Col- 


4333 


62 


Ditto. 






lege, Allahabad. 








21 


4 mar Nath Shiughal, 


GoTfc. High School, 


4297 


61 


Ditto. 






Muzeffarnagar. 








22 


J araa Ram Agrawal, 


Govt. ( . 0. High School, 


4291 


61 


Ditto. 






Roorkee. 








28 


Joti Prasad. 


Govt. High School, 


4288 


61 


Ordinary certificate as Overtteer. 






M uia ffar nag ar. 








24 


?earo I A! Gupta. 


Govt. High School, Ali- 


4278 


61 


Higher certificate as Overweer. 






garh. 






* 


25 


Ugra Sen Rhartna. 


Govt. High School, 


4272 


61 


Ditto. 






Meerut. 








26 


ianwal Singh. 


V. S. Jat High School, 


4230 


60 


Ditto, 






Kheragarhi. 








27 


Bisheshwar Daya 


Govt. High School, 


4220 


60 


Ditto. 


28 


Garg 
Srikrishna Bhatia. 


Muzaffarnagar. 
A. V. High School, 


4219 


60 


Ditto. 






Sikandrabad. 








29 

30 


Brandaban. 
Kishori Lai Vaish 


Agrn College, Agra. 
D. N. High School, 


4187 
4122 


60 
59 


Ordinary certificate as Orer*eer 
Ditto. 






Meerut. 








31 


Rikkhab Dae. 


Govt. High School, 


4058 


58 


Ditto. 






Muzaffarnagar. 








32 


Saiyid Manzoor All. 


Govt. High Sckool, Bu- 


4034 


58 


Ditto. 






landBhahr. 








da 


Shiv Dayal Gupta. 


KayasthaPathshala High 


4029 


58 


Ditto. 






School, Aligarh. 




i 


34 


Shri Nivas Sharma. 


Govt. High School, 


3849 


55 


Ditto. 






Muzaffarnugar. 








35 


Chhotan Lai. 


Govt. High School, 


3726 


59 


Ditto. 






Muiaffarnagar. 








36 


Kanti Prasad Sharma 


D.N. High School, Meerul 


3656 


52 


Ditto. 


37 


Mad n n Mohan Aran 


D.N. High School, Meerul 


3529 


50| Ditto. 



YKAKLY LIST, 

1926. 



No. 


Names;. 


Remarks. 




DRAFTSMAN CLASS, THIRD 
YKAB. 




1 


Md. Yasin Khan 


Certificate as Draftttmau. Prize for General Merit. 


2 


Samuel Egbert 


Certificate an Draftsman- 


8 


Atiwar-ul-Haq 


Ditto. 


4 


Jagat Perahad . 


Ditto, 


5 


Ugar Sain 


Ditto. 


a 


Gwiga Saliai 


Ditto. 










\ 





222 



YRAKLY LIST, 

1927. 



No. 



Names. 



Kaiik and <"orp*, and 
wlicre educated. 



CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, HRD YEAR. 
(Ml Mark* 7820). 

1 ! Ghanshyam Narayan University College, Al- 
Diknliit, B.sc, lahabad. 



6077|78 



Karnaii Singh 



Moti Lai Aggarwal.. 

Amolak Kam Khanna, 
B.A, 



Daulat Hain Jain 



Rap Lai Varma 
\fauoHar Lai Sood, 
B.A. 



Khalsa College, Am ri tsar 



574273 



Govt, College, Lahore 
Govt. College, Lahore 

Agra College 



5662 72 



Indra Jit Kai Taudan, Mohiudta College, Patiala 



F. 0. College, Lahore 
Govt. College, Lahore 



Hari Krishen Nivas ...I Govt. College, Lahore 



5611 



72 



5444 70 



5257 67 

521167 
5077 65 



5<'7S 65 



Remarks. 



Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer, Council of India 
Prize of Rs. 1 ,000 for General 
Proficiency. Thoniason Prize 
of RR. 250 for BeHt Indian 
student obtaining Higher 
Certificate, Cautlcy Memorial 
Gold Medal for Mathematics. 
Silver Medals for Descriptive 
Engineering, Suiveying and 
Mechanical Engineering, 
General MacLagan's Prize of 
Books for Electrical Engin- 
eering arid Physics Silver 
Medal for Laboratory Prac- 
tice. ShuHhila and J. Mitra 
Memorial Silver Medal for 
best Indian student who ob- 
tains highest markB in Chem- 
istry. 

Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Kngineer. Kai Bahadur 
Kaiihya Lai Gold Medal for 
best Indian Student who does 
not obtain Tho mason Prize. 
8ir llarcourt Butler's Cup 
for Study and Athletics com- 
bined. 

Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. 

Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. t'alcott Reilly 
Memorial Gold Medal for 
A pplied Mechanics. 

Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer, Thomason Memo- 
rial Gold Medal for best 
Engineering design, Silver 
Medal for Drawing. 

I Higher Certificate as A^ist- 
f ant Engineer. 



(Ordinary Certificate as 
I Assistant Engineer. t 



YEARLY LIST. 
1927 



No. 



Names. 

Dwarka Nath Khurana 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


| Marks 1 
gained. | 


* . Per cent. 1 


Reniftrks. 


10 


Govt. College, Lahore 


505 8 


l 


11 


Ishwara Nand Bahl ... 


Govt. College, Lahore 


4030 


68 




12 


Ujagar Lai riwtur- 
vedi. 


St. John'8 School, Agra ... 


4927 


63 




18 


Sita Ram Mehra 


Govt. f olle-ge, Lahore 


4925 


63 




14 
15 
10 
17 


fagdish Prasad ... 
Sri Harn Wasudev. B.A 


Hindu University, Benares 
,G. II. ^choo), Dharanishala 


4904 
4904 
4860 
4KW 


M 
63 
02 
02 


^Ordinary Certificate as Assist- 
ant Engineer 


Devi Chandra Khanua 
Vidya Prakash 


Govt. C'ollege, Lahore 
Govt. College. Lahore 


18 


Kirpa Narain, H.A. ... 


iSt. Stephen'* College, Delhi 


480(1 


(il 




19 


Barkat Ham Lamhu 


D. A. V. College, Lahore ... 


4794 


(51 




20 


Baboo Singh Jootla ... 


Sain Das A. 3. Hi<zh School, 
Jullmidnr. 


4735 


6i; 

( 




21 


Beli Kam Malhotra, 

B.SC. 


V. B. High School, Dera 
Ismail Khan. 


4687 


60| 




22 


Richard Frederick 
Thomas Farraut. 


St. George's College. MUK- 
soorie. 


4288 


56 


J 


23 


Bisheshar DayalGoyu] 


University College of 
Science, Allahabad. 


4144 


53 


Ordinary Certificate as Afiflist- 
ant Engineer. Silver Medal 
for Photo, and Ferrotype. 


24 


Gokal Chand 


Hovt College, Lahore .. 


4138 


r>3 




25 


Aifhwarya Chandra 
Agrawal. 


Agra College, A:rn 


4106 


53 


Ordinary Certificate 
^ Assistant Engineer. 


26 


Girdhari Lai Kuinar.., 


Govt. College, Lahore ... 


4087 


& 





224 



YEARLY LIST. 

imr. 



No. 


Namea. 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


Marks 1 
gained. 1 


1 Per cent. 1 


TtWMtffr 8 - 




OVERSEER CL 


ASS SECOND YEAR. 










(full Mark*, 4900.) 








I 


Kailash Chandra Mital 


Muslim University Inter 


3477 


71 


Higher Certificate as Overseer 






College, Aligarh. 






Siver Medal and Rs. 100 for 












General Merit. Rai Bahadur 












Kanhya Lai Silver Medal for 












bent Indian student who 












stands first. Silver Medal 












far Drawing and Ferrotype. 












Dnrga Das Dutt Silver Medal 












for Bent Indian Htudent ob- 












taining Higher Certificate. 


2 


Jambu Prasad 


Govt. High School, Saha- 


B436 


70 


ligher Certificate as Overseer. 






ra-npur. 






Rai Bahadur Kanhya Lai 












Silver Medal for Best Indian 












student who gtands second in 












class. 


a 


Parmatma Swarup ... 


Church Mission High 


5417 


70 


rligher Certificate as Overseer. 






School, Meerut. 






Fairley Memorial Silver 












Medal for Applied Mechanics 












end Silver Medal for accounts. 


4 


Shiam Sundar Lai 


Govt. High School, Saha- 


3401 


69 


Higher Certificate as Overseer. 




Bhatnagar. 


ranpur. 






Keay Memorial Silver Medal 












and Rs. 18 for Estimating, 


5 


Mannn Lai Mitai 


Govt. High School, Mil- 


3361 


69 


Jigher Certificate as Overseer. 






zaffarnagar, 






Silver Medal for Elementary 












Mathematics. Sullivan Memo- 












rial Silver Medal for Mecha- 












nics, 


6 


ECanwa) Singh .. 


N. R, E. C. Inter. College, 


3358 


69 


lightr Certificate as Overseer. 






Khurja 






SiUer Medal for Workshops. 


7 


Balm Hum 


A. V. High School, Sikand- 


3307 


67 


ligher Certificate as Overseer. 






arabad. 






Silver Medal for Surveying. 


8 


Hazari Lai 


Divisional College, Meerut 


3254 


66 


iigher Certificate as Overseer. 












Silver Medal for Desciptive 












Engineering. 


9 


3ar Charon Das . 


N. H. E. C. Inter. College, 


3187 


65 


Higher Certificate as Overseer. 






Khurja. 








10 


3abu Ram Sharraa ,,. 


Govt. High School, Mu- 


3141 


64 


Ordinary Certificate as Overseer. 






zaffarnagar. 








11 


Mulk Raj Bahadur ... 


N. R. E. C. Inter, College, 


3121 


64 


1 






Khurja. 






1 


12 


ianwal Nain Singh ... 


K. E. M. , Tat High School, 


3121 


64 


1 






Lakhaoti. 






'.Higher Certificate M Over- 


13 


Babu Ram Gupta ..JGovt High School, Mu- 


3096 


63 


1 seer. 






zaffarnagar. 








14 


?uran Mai Gupta ... 


Govt. High School, Mu- 


3092 


63 


1 






zafarnagar. 




1 


15 


Joti Praaad Jain 


Church Mission High 


8045 


62 Ordinary Certificate as Overseer. 






School, Meernt. 







YEARLY U8T. 
1927. 



225 



No, 



Names. 


Rank imd Corps, and 
where educated. 


&i 
J! 

S be 


J Per cent. I 


Remarks. 


16 


Ram Sewak Misra ... 


Govt. Inter. College, Al- 


2959 


60 


1 






lahabad. 








17 


Phul Chanel 


N. R. E. 0. Inter. College, 


2920 


GO 








Khurja. 








18 


^'rayag DaR 


I), N. High School, Meerut 


2917 


60 




19 


3am Prasad Rastogi 


Govt. Inter. College, Mo- 


>878 


^9 








radabad. 








20 


iatan La) Jain 


N. K. K. C. Inter. College, 


285C) 


58 








Kliurja. 








21 


Shiv Sarau Maheswari 


[). A. V. High School, 


2834 


58 








Muzaffarnagar. 








22 


Rikhab Das 


Govt. Iligh >rhool, Mu- 


281? 


57 








zaffnrnagar. 








23 


Tilak Ram 


Govt. High School, Mu- 


,795 


}7 








zaffarnagar. 








24 


Suraj Prakash Hajeley 


Victoria ('ollege, Lashkar 


2788 


">7 




25 


Bhagwat Dayttl Sharrna 


Govt. Hi^h School, Meerut 


278r> 


">7 




26 


Jttam Rai Gupta .,, 


Govt. High School, Badaun 


2782 


r )7 




27 


$am Swarup Nohawar 


B. I.R. A.V. High School, 


2779 


>7 








Tnndla. 








28 


Ram Sarup 


Govt. High School, Mu- 


^743 


56 


1 Ordinary Certificate as Over- 






zalTaniiigar. 






( seer. 


29 


Janeshwar Prasad ... 


C. M. High School, Meerut 


2736 


56 




30 


Madan Mohan Lai 


Radha Swamilnter.College, 


2702 


55 






Bhatnagar. 


Agra. 








81 


Jado Ram 


Govt. Inter. College, Al- 


2654 


54 








lahabad. 








32 


Peeru Mai Sharma ... 


Govt. High School, Mu- 


2633 


54 








zaffarnagar. 








33 


Sewa Ham 


D. A. V. High School, 


2621 


53 








Muzaffarnagar. 








34 


Muhammad Wall 


Govt. High School, Meerat 


2619 


53 






Ullah Khan. 










35 


Bhola Nath 


N'. R. E. C. Inter. College, 


2613 


53 








Khnrja. 








36 


Bhag Mai 


Jat Vedic High School, 


2550 


52 








Baraut. 








S7 


Anand Sarup (Tehri 


Govt. C. 0. High School, 


2530 


52 






State). 


Roorkee, 








38 


Tara Chand 


Cantt. A. V. High School, 


2454 


50 








Meerut, 








39 


Dipa Chand Gupta ... 


N. R. E. C. Inter. College, 


2450 


50 


j 






Khurja. 









ALT LUX. 
*f 



No, 


Names. 


Kemarks. 




DRAFTSMAN CLASS, THIMD 






YEAR, 




1 


Ladli Kiwhore Agnihotri ... 


Certificate as Draftsman, Prize for General Merit. 


3 


S. M.Hanif 


Certificate as Draitsman. Prize for General tyerit. 






t i, K* * , t i 


3 


Bahu Lai 


Certificate a Draftsman. 


4 


Mon/oor Hnssain 


Ditto. 


5 


Daya Ham 


Ditto. 


6 


Psrmeshwari Das Goyal 


Ditto. 


7 


Mnrtaza 11 twain 


Ditto. 


8 


Mangal Sen Goyal 


Ditto. 


9 


Mufthfiq H UK sain , M 


Ditto. 


10 


Munshi La) Sharnm ... 


Ditto. 


11 


Abdul Awal 


Ditto. 


12 


KhurBhaia AH ... 


Certificate a* Simple Diftman. 


13 


Abmr Hussaiu 


Certificate a. Tracer. 



tlSARI.V ti 

lift. 



if? 



No. 


Names. 


Rank aud ("orp, Uu<l 
where educated. 


ft 


> Per cent. | 


Remarks. 




CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS, 3RD YEAR. 










(Full tfarlc* 7862). 








1 


Yadava Mohan. 


Divisional College, Meerut, 


6076 


77 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 












Engineer, Council of India 












Prize of Rs. 1,000 for Gene- 












ral Proficiency. C a u 1 1 e y 












Memorial Gold Metjal for 












Mathewttiku ft 1 c w 1 1 












Reilly Memorial Gold JMedal 












for Applied Mechanics. Sil- 












ver Medals for Descriptive 












EngineeRtog?ad Surveying, 












General Maclagan's Prize of 












Book* for. .Htoctrkai Engin- 












eering and Physics. Silver 












Medals for Laboratory l*rac ; 












tk^^d Mechanical In$n- 












eering. Sir Harcourt Butler 












Cu|) ior , Study and Athle- 












tics combined. 


2 


Hani Lai Khazma, B,A,, 


&ovt. College, Lahore, ... 


5689 


n 


Higher Certificate an Assistant 












Engineer. Thonmson Prize 












pf (l ,Jte, $0, for ,tbif. n^st 












Distinguished Student who 












obtains lh Hitfhw Certi- 












ficate, but does notjgain the 












Council of India Prtae. 


3 


Chuni Lai Handa, ...' 


Govt, College, Lahore, ... 


5643 


72 


Higher Certificate RH Asnistant 












Kanhya Lai Gold Medal 












for bes&< Ionian Student 












who does not obtain the 












Thomason Prize. Silver 












Modal for Photo, and 












Ferrotype, 


4 


Harnandan Prasad 


Luqlmow University, Luc- 


5628 


73 






Sinha. 


now. 








5 


Azid Bakhali, 


Govt. College, Lahore, 


5548 


71 


Higher Certificate as Assist* 










. ( 


ant Engineer. 


6 


Jainti Prasad Jain, ... 


Divisional College, Meerut,! 


5544 


71 




7 


Hari Chand Kalra, ... 


GoTt. College, Lahore, ... 


5476 


70 


J 



228 



YEARLY 
1928. 



No 


Name*. 


Bank ami Corps, ami 
where educated. 


| Marks 1 
i gained. 1 


I Per cont. | 


Remarks. 


8 


Shiv Nath, B.Hc., .. 


Forman Christian College, 


5434 


(19 


Higher Certificate as Assis- 






Lahore. 


I 




tant Engineer Thomason 












Memorial Gold Medal for 












best Engineering Designs. 












Sushila and J. Mittra 












Memorial Silver Medal for 












best Indian Student who 












obtains Highest marks in 












Chemistry. 


9 


laghubir Saran Jain, 


Divisional College, Mcerut, 


5342 


<8 


( Higher Certificate as Assis- 


10 


Sikrara Jit, 


Govt. College, Lahore, 


5282 


<i7 


( tant Engineer, 


11 


Qurban Singh, 


Khalsa College, Amritsar, 


5171 







12 


Begina dwray Wilson, 


St. George's College, Mus- J5121 


(>5 








soorie. 






1 


IB 


urendra Nath Tripathi 


Canning College, Lucknow 


5093 


(15 




14 


Daya Ram Yadava, 


Agra College, Agra, 


508G 


(55 






B.Sc. 










16 


rishaii Lai Bansal, . . . 


Govt,. High School, Gurclas- 


4988 


03 


^ Ordinary C e r t i ti c a t e as 






pur. 






Assistant Engineer. 


16 


Krishna Nand Dua, ... 


Canning College, Lucknow, 


4838 


52 




17 


biam Sundar Lai, ... 


Jniversity School of Science 


4788 


61 








Allahabad. 








18 


Mohammad Naiman 


luslim University, Aligarh, 


4744 


60 






Ansari. 










19 


liva Shanker Sharma, 


Banning College, Lucknw, 


4078 


60 




20 


Wilfred Ronald Floury, 


st. Joseph's College, Naini 
Tal. 


4f>5(5 


59 


Ordinary Certificate as 
Assistant Engineer. Silver 












Medal for Drawing. 


21 


*ercy Harold McLean, 


St. Joseph's College, Naini 


456558 








Tal. 






22 


)harm Pal Sondhi, ... 


S. I*. College, (Srinagar) 


4539 


58 








Kasmir. 








23 


zhar Ali Abbasi, 


Muslim University, Aligarh, 


1515 


57 














t Ordinary Certificate as 


24 


Diwan Chand Bahl, ... 


). A. V. College, Lahore, ... 


4493 


57 


Assistant Engineer. 


25 


Charanjil Lai Malhotra 


forman Christian College, 


4359 


55 








Lahore. 








26 


Mir Abdur liahim, ... 


Govt. College, Lahore, ... 


4087 


52 





YEARLY LIST. 
1928. 



No. 


. ! 
Names. 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


11 


I per cent. | 


Keuwrks. 




OVERSEER CLASS, SECOND YEAR. 










(Full Marte 4700). 








I 


Budhi Tarsad Jain. 


Meerut College, Meerut, 


3260 


W 


Higher certificate as Overseer. 










Silver Medal and Rs. 100 for 










General Merit Hai Buhadur 










Kuiihya Lai Silver Medal for 












he4 Indian student who stands 












first. Silver Medal for Kle- 










! mentary MethematifH and 












Estimating. Durga DnssDutt 












Silver Me(lal foi best Indian 












student obtaining Higher cer- 












tificate. 


2 


Ram Prasad Jhaldyal. 


Messmore High School, 


3210 


68 


Higher certificate as Overseer 






Pauri Garlnval. i 




Fa it ley Menioi ial Silver 






i 




Medal for Applied Mechanics, 










silver Medal for Descriptive 










Engineering. Kai Bahadur 












Kanhya Lai Silver Medal for 












Indian student who stands 2nd 










in the class. 


8 


Chatar Singh, 


Meerut College, Meerut. .8186 


68 


Higher certilicato an Overseer. 












Silver Medal for Workshops. 


4 


Stiraj Mai Gupta. 


Government High School, 


3178 


68 


1 






Muzaffarnagar. 






I 












) Higher certificate as Overseer, 


5 


Shiv-Nath Sharma, 


Government High School, 


3168 


67 


I 






Saharanpore. 






J 


6 


Babu Ram. 


Government High School, 


3075 


05i Ordinary certificate as Overseer. 






Meerut. 








7 


Brij Nandau Bhar- 


D. A.-V. High School, 


3042 


65 


1 




gava, 


Muzaffarnagar. 








8 


Amba Sahai. 


Govorumeiil High School, 


3015 


64 


} Higher certificate as Overseer. 






Mainpuri. 








9 


Surendra Prasada 


Deva Nagri Hi:h School, 


3006 


64 


1 

i 




Garga. 


Meerut. 






J 


10 


Krishna Lai 


N. A. S. High School, 


2990 64 


Higher certificate as Overseer. 






Meerut. 






Silver Medal for Surveying. 


11 


Salek Chand. 


N. A. S, High School, 


2973 


61} 


1 






Meerut. 






1 












} Higher certifuateas Overseer. 


12 


Gokula NaiidKimochi 


King GwrgeVGovt. High 


2951 J63 


j 






School, LatiHdowne 


J 



fRARLT tl8f . 
1928 



No. 


Names, 


Rank and Corps, and 
where e lucated. 


*! 

*' 
2950 


c 

I 


Hemarks. 


13 


Shanker Lai Mitel 


N. K. E.G. Inter College, 
Khurja. 


63 


Higher certificate as Overseer. 


14 


Jagdish Prann'l Pra- 
dhau. 


Meerut College. Nfeernt. 


2891 


62 


Higher wrtificate m . Ovtr^eer . 
Sullivan \1emonal Silver 
Medal for Mechanics. 


15 


Sohan Lai Garga. 


J. A. High School, Khurja 


2883 


61 


i 


16 
17 


Lakshmi Narain. 
ManSumrat Das Jain. 


Government High School, 
Muzaffarnagar. 

Meenit College, Meerut. 


2813 

2810 


fi() 
60 


, Ordinary Certificate as Orer- 
eer. 


18 


Balbir >ingh, 


D. S. M. High School, 
Kanth (Moradabad). 


2788 


5i 


j 


19 

20 


Kam Prasad Bhar- 
gava 

Jawaliar Singh. 


N. R. E. C. Inter College, 
Khurja. 

Radhaswami Educational 
Inst. Dayal Bagh, Agra 


2754 
2751 


S9 

59 


Ordinary certificate as Over- 
seer. Silvei Medal for 
Drawing. 


21 


Hari Singh. 


Government High School, 
Saharanpur. 


2749 


58 




22 


Ajtidhia Pi-anad, 


N. A. S. High School, 
Meerut. 


2720 


58 




23 


Muushi Lai Mital. 


Government High School, 
Aligarh. 


2705 


58 




24 

25 


Om Prakash Gupta. 
Jai Prakash Vainh, 


Government High School, 
Saharanpur. 

Government C, 0. High 
School, Koorkee. 


2700 
2087 


57 
57 


'.Ordinary Certificate as Over- 
seer. 


26 


Ana Ram. 


Government High School, 
> uzatfarnagar. 


2668 


57 




27 


Ear Prasad Sharma. 


Meerut College. Meerut. 


2647 


56 




28 


Om Prakash Vaish. 


Government High School, 
Muzaffarnagar. 


2641 


56 




*& 


Gulab Singh Sharma. 


P. B. A. S. High School, 
Uathras. 


2632 


56 




30 


Mirza Muhammad 
Tahir,. 


S^liia Inter College, Luck- 
now. 


2623 


56 


J 


81 


GBga Prasftd. 


N.R. E.G. Inter College, 
Khurja 


2620 


56 


Ordinary certificate *s Ovtmeer . 
Silver Medal for Account*. 



YEARLY LIST, 

193$, 



NO, 



Names, 


Bank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


Marks 1 
gained. I 


per cent. | 


Remarks. 


32 


Udai Singh, 


J. A. S. High School, 


2569 


55 


1 






Khurja. 








33 


Kailash Chandra, 


N.K.K.C. Inter, College, 
Khurja. 


2560 


54 




84 


Dwarka Nath. 


N. A. S. High School, 


2533 


54 








Meernt. 








8s 


Shivcharan Lai A gar- 


Government Hi^h School 


2."0 


53 


" Ordinary certificate as Oer- 
1 seer. 




wal. 


Haafhras. 








86 


G n lab Hai 


Maharaja's Intermediate 


2421 


52 








College, Jaipur. 








87 


Seva Ham. 


1). A. V. High School, 


2368 


50 








Muzaffaraagar. 









282 



YEARLY LIST. 
1928. 



No. 

1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 



Names, 



DRAFTSMAN CLASS, THIKD 
' YEAK. 

Shanti PraknHh Sandil. 
Gotum Pevshad, 

Aynb Khan, ., 

Ikram Singh, 

Rani Prasfld, 

Habib Ullali Khan, 

Abdul Majid 

Abdul Sattar, 

Krishnn Deo Nayer, 

Shabbir Ahmed, 

Banarsi J)an, ., 

Miwi Singh, 



Remarks, 



ConiticatcnB Draftsman. Silvei Medal for General 
Merit, and 1st Prize of Us. 30 'as best Draftsman. 

Certificate as Draftsman, and 2nd Prize of Rs. 20 as 

2nd best Draftsman. 

Certificate as Draftsman. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Certificate as Simple Draftsman, 
Certificate as Draftsman. 
Certificate us Simple Draftsman. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Certificate as Draftsman, (granted in January 1929). 



YEARLY List, 

1099. 



831 



No, 


Names. 


Hank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


13 
^6 0> 

'l 

S& 


|Per cen | 


Remarks. 




CIVIL ENGINEER CLASS 3RD YEAH. 










(Full Marks 7890). 








1 


Dharam Chand Baijal, 


Meerut College, Meerut, ... 


6081 


77 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 




B.sc. 








Engineer. Council of India 












Prize of RR, 1.000 for fcene- 












ral Proficiency, Silver Me- 












dal for Descriptive Engineer- 












ing and Surveying. Calcott 










Reilly Memorial Gold Medal 












lor Applied Mechanics. 


^* 


Mulk Ha j Chopra, 


Govt. ^College, Lahore, ... 


5902 


75 


Higher Certificate a* AnsiKtant 












Engineer. Thoiuasou Prize 












of Rs. 250 for the uio*t dis- 












tinguinhed student who ob- 












tains Higher Certificate, but 












doen not gain Council of 












India Prize. Silver Medal 












for Mechanical Engineering. 












General MacLagan's prize of 












Books for Electrical Engi- 












neering and Physics. 


3 


DCS Raj Khanna, 


D. A,V, High School, 


5834 


74 


Higher Certificate as A^intant 






Lahore. 






Engineer. Kai Bahadur Kan* 












hya Lai Gold Medal for best 












Indian Student who does not 












obtain Thomason Prize. 


4 


Shanti Lai Sahgal, B.A., 


Govt. College, Lahore, ... 


5761 


73 


Higher Certificate n* AKHistaut 
Engineer. Silver Medal for 












Drawing and Laboratory 












Practice. Sushila & J. Mitra 












Memorial Silver Medal for 












bent Indian Student who ob- 












tains highest marks in Che- 












mistry. 


5 


Dew Raj Kohli, B.A., , 


D.A, V. College, Lahore, 


5657 


72 


j 












I Higher Certificate an Assist- 


6 


Parmeshwar Swaroop 


La Martiniere College, 


5643 


72 


j ant Engineer. 




Bhatnagar. 


Lucknow. 






J 


7 


Ham Da*. 


Govt. High School, Julian- 
dur City. 


6564 


71 


Higher Certificate aft Assistant 
Engineer. Cautley Memorial 
Gold Medal tor Mathematics. 


* 


Balwaut Singh Nag, .. 


Khatoft College, Amritsar, 


5547 


70 


Higher Certificate an Aanietant 












Engineer. Silver Medal for 












Photo, and Ferrotype. 



234 



YEARLY LIHT. 
1929 



No. 


Namew. 


Rank and CorpH, and i 
where educated. 


S "d 
^ o 

S.S 

*2 03 

^ be 

>5?7 
5496 


S 
o 

>- 

OJ 

7U 
70 


Remarks. 


9 
10 


Atol Chandra Muxerji, 

B.8C. 

Kipdaman Singh, 


Uniyersity College of 
Science, Allahabad. 
Khalsa College, Amritsar, 


1 


11 
12, 


Hari DH.H Awasty, B.A., 
liomesh Chandra Mehta, 


Govt. College, Lahore, 
Govt. College, Lahore, ... 


5465 
53i>7 


09 

68 


Higher ( ertificate as Assist- 
ant Engineer. 


13 


Ganpat Kai Chadha, B.A. 


Govt. College, Lahore, 


,j3;a 


68 


; 


14 
15 


Robert Henry Goodman, 
Govenlhan Lall, B.A., ... 


St Joseph's College, Naini 
Tal 

Govt. College, Lahore, .. 


5274 

5125 


tJ 
65 


Higher (Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. Thomason Memo- 
rial Gold Medal and Books 
for best Engineering Design. 
\ 


16 


Shiva Narain Wadhwa, 


D. A V. College, Lahore, 


51 1 J* 


tio 




17 


Kundan Lall Bhatia, ... 


Govt. College, Lahore, ... 


5054 


61 




18 

iy 

20 

21 


Shri ham Agarwala, 
B.Se. 
Brahma Swarup Mathur 
B.Se. 
Birendra Gupta, 

Suraj Bhan Batra, B.A., 


Agra (College, Agra, 

Allahabad University, 
Allahabad. 
Govf. High School, Mu- 
Kaffarnagar. 
Govt. College, Lahore, ... 


4944 
45WJ 
4912 

48H8 


G3 
(>l ; 
62 
62 




22 
28 


Satiudra Kumar Mukerji, 

B.Se. 
Sobhag Kai Mehta, 
(Bahawalpur State). 


The Nizam College. 
Hyderabad Decean. 
S. K. College, Bahawalpur 
State. 


4855 

47 a i 


6:' 
<>U 


Ordinary Certificate as Assist- 
ant Engineer. 


24 
25 


Kaghnbir Sahai Mathur, 
Radhey Shiam Gupta, ... 


Dharatu Samaj High 
School, Aligarh. 
Agra College, Agra, 


4542 
4476 


58 
57 




26 


Brij Mohan Johri, 


Agra College. Agra, 


4404 


56 




27 
28 


Rama Swamp Ohatur- 
yedi. 
Shiva Dayal Smha, ... 


Govt. High School, Cawn- 
pore. 
Meerut College, Meerut. 


4889 
4S8L> 


50 

56 




29 
30 


Krishnanand, 

Gurdial Pershad, (Kam- 
pur State). 


K. P. University College, 
Allahabad. 
Govt. High School, Meerut, 


4152 
41"9 


53 
52 


j 


$ 


Jwala PrashadlSingh, .,, 
^ithori Lai, 


Khalsa College, Amrit^ar, 
Agra College, Agra, 


5254 
3809 


67 

48 


Higher Certificate as Assistant 
Engineer. 

Fail**. 



YfCAKLY LIST. 

1920. 



288 



No 


Xames. 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


00 >-Q 

I'" 


c 
^ Remarks. 

u 






- 


A be 


2 




OVERSEER CLASS, SECOND YEAR. 








(Full Mark* 4700). 






1 


Shiva Sharana Swatni. Govt. High : ehool, Bijno 


3446' 


?3 Higher certificate as Overseer, 








Silver Medal and Rn. 100 for 










General Merit. Rat Bahadur 








Ktuihya Lai Silver Medal for 








Indian student who stands 








first in the Class. Silver Medal 








for Descriptive Engineering. 










Durga Dans Durt Silver 










Medal for best Indian student 










obtaining Higher certificate. 


2 


Nathu Mai Jaiu. 


Govt. High School, Cawu 


3370 7 


2 Higher certificate as Overseer, 






pore. 




Fairley Memorial Silver 










Medal for Applied Mechanics. 










H;ti Bahadur Kanhyu. Lai 










Silver Medal for Indian 










student who stands 2nd in the 


3 


Jiwan Lai. 


Govt. High School, Muzaf 


S344 7 


1 Higher certificate as Overseer. 






farnagar. 




Sullivan Memorial Silver 










1 Medal for Mechanics. Keay 










Memorial Silver Medal and 








Rs. 1 8 for Estimating. Silver 








Medal for Workshop practice 








and Elementary Mathematics. 


4 


Sukhbir Singh. 


Govt, High School, Mnzaf- 


88S2 7 


Higher certificate as Overseer. 






iarnagar. 






5 


Dund Bahadur. 


Bureilly College, Bareilly. 


3263 6 


Higher certificate a Overseer. 










Silver Medal for Surveying 










and Drawing. 


6 


Raghuber Dat Pande. 


Govt High School, Naini 


0896 


) 






Tal. 






7 


Raja Ram. 


Meerut College, Meerut. 


081 6< 


> Higher certificate as ( )verseer 


8 


Mohammad Kizwan 


OHmania College, Hydera- 


073 6* 


1 




Ghani. 


bad, Deccan. 






9 


Narain Dat Pujari. 


jovt. High School, Srina- 


042 6r 


Ordinary certificate an Overseer. 






gar, Garhwal. 






10 


Trilok Chand Gupta. 


Meerut College, Meerut. 


033 63 


1 


11 


Mathura Datt Joshi. 


Govt. High School, Naini 5 


2987 64 








Tal. 






12 


[ndra Prakash. 


Govt. High School, Saha-i 


J981 63 


\ Higher certificate as Overseer. 






ranpnr. 






13 


Bhagwat Dayal. A . V.'High School, Meerut. 'i 


'941 63 




14 


Jagdish Sarau. Meerut College, Meerut. 5 


93863 


1 ) 



286 



VKABtY IJST. 
1929. 



Na 


Nawe.v 


Rank and Corps, and 
where educated. 


11 
SJ 


[Per cent. 1 


Remark*, 


15 


Dhara Singh. 


Agra College, Agra. 


2898 


62 


1 


16 


Jwala Prasad Sinhn. 


Meerut College, Meerut. 


2877 


61 


^Higher Certificate a Over- 
seer. 


17 


Anand Prakanh Gupta. 


Kauya Kubja Inter. Col- 
lege, Lucknow, 


2843 


60 


i 


18 


Kunwar Bahadur. 


Govt. High School, Muzaf- 
faruagar. 


2818 


GO 


h'dinary certificate as Overseer. 


19 


Areh Dan Jain. 


B. D. High School, Am- 
hala. 


2782 


59 


Ordinary certificate as Overseer, 
Silver Medal for Accounts. 


20 


Nathu Singh. 


Govt. High School, Najiba- 
bad. 


2776 


59 


1 


21 


Virandra Vir Hastogi. 


Divisional College, Meerut. 


2763 


59 




22 


Amrit Hoop Uai. 


Jawant College, Jodhpur. 


2759 


59 


^Ordinary certificate ai Over- 
seer. 


23 


Ballabli 1'rasnd. 


A. P. Mission High School, 
Dehra Dun. 


2724 


58 


J 


24 


Roop Thandra Vaish. 


Meerut College, Meerut. 


2722 


58 Silver Medal for Photo, atid 
I Ferrotype. 


25 


Tara Chand. 


Meerut (Allege, Meerut. ;2707 


58 


1 


26 


Bft*a,nt Lai. 


W. 1. M. High School, 
Bareilly. 


2708 


58 




27 


Mirza Hasan Alimad 
Baig. 


Muslim University, Ali- 
garh, 


2690 


57 




28 
29 


Babn Ham. 
Ookul DevThapliyal. 


Govt, High School, Mnzaf- 
farnagar. 

Private. 


i'688 
2675 


57 

57 


I Ordinary crtitic*tt an Over- 
seer. " 


80 


Gopi Nath Bansal. 


Moerut College, Meerut. 


2596 


55 




31 


Ram Chandra Singhal. 


N.R.E.C, College, Khurja. 


2574 


55 




, "> ''! 


Hftrchftran Lai Agrawal. 


Bareilly College, Bareilly. 


2516 


54 


j 



TEABLY LIST. 



887 



No. 



Names of Students. 



DRAFTSMAN CLASS, THIRD 
YEAR. 

Jai Nand Sharnia. ... 



Mohammad Mustafa Zaidi, 



Banhir Ahmad, 



Remarks, 



Certificate as Draftsman, 1st clans. 1st Priie of 
Hs. 80 as heat Draftsman, 

Certificate an Draftsman, 1 st class, 2nd Priit of 
Us. 20 as 2nd beat Draftsman. 

Certificate a* Draftsman, 2nd claw. 



YEARLY LIST. 239 

1929. 

PERCENTAGE OF MAKKS OF STUDENTS. 

The following table shows the percentages of marks gained by 
the various classes for the last ten years and the numbers that 
qualified : 





Civil Engineer Class. 


Overseer Class. 




3rd year, 


2nd year. 


1st year. 


2nd year. 


li year. 


Year. 


, ' 


y 

44 







i^ 


r/ 




j^ 


y. 




y 

^s 


y 




r, 


Is ! - 


d 





IB 


rt 


ijj 


<L> 


OS 


ai 


a* 


c! 


S 


o 


sS 




















































^ 








o> 






o 






cu 






0) 




55 o 






bC 




S3 


tit 




C 


fee 


t/ 




tl/ 




~ I 50 




.8 <y 


85 


J 


o* 


cfi 


^ 


D 1 


08 


a; 


a 


flt 


r 


o 1 ! g 







0> 


bO 


c 


cu 


5C 


6 


a* 


bo 


d 


o 


Ofc 


O ' ^> 




W X: 


^ 


K 


X 


^ 


M 


* 


^ 


B 




^ 


3 


^ '< 


1925-S6 ... 


76 30 


65 


83 


26 


6. 


T6 


2S 


61 


73 


37 


62 


70 


40 


60 


1926-27 ... 


78 26 


63 


76 


2* 


63 


77 


31 


65 


71 


!> 


00 


74 


37 


50 


1927-28 ... 


77 26 


64 


79 


31 


66 


75 


v9 


62 


69 


37 


60 


73 


33 


fi7 


1928-29 - 


77 31 


65 


77 


28 


63 


79 


32 


62 


73 


32 


62 


76 


35 


60 






















1 












































LJU 
O 

o: 

Of 



O 

cc 

to 

tu 

at 



O 
h- 



OO 

uu 



ANNDAL REPORT. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1928-29. 

FROM 

P. P. PHILLIPS, ESQ., PH. D., F. L C., I, E. S., 

OFFG. PRINCIPAL, THOMASON COLLBOB, ROORKKE. 
To 

THB DEPUTY SECRETARY TO GOVERNMENT, 

UNITED PROVINCES, EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



Dated Roorkee, the 16th July, 1929. 
SIR, 

I have the honour to forward herewith the annual report of the 
Thomason Civil Engineering College for the session 1928-29. together 
with the usual statements of accounts for the financial year ending the 
31st March, 1929. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The following official and non- official gentlemen served on 'the 
Thomason College Advisory Council during the year : 

Mr. Jwala Prasada, I.S.E., Chief Engineer and Secretary to' 
Government, Irrigation Branch, Public Works Department, United 
Provinces, ................................................................. President, 

Mr. P. H. Tillard, I.S.E., Chief Engineer, Buildings and Roadfe 
Branch, Public Worki Department, United Provinces. 

Mr. H. R. flarrop, M.A., M.L.C., Offg. Director of Public Instruction, 
United Provinces. 

Representative of the Institution of Engineers (India), ........ Vacant. 

Mr. 8. P. Shah, I.C.B., Director of Industries, United Provinces. 
The Divisional Superintendent, East Indian Railway, Lucknow, 
Pandit Ntnak Chand, M.A., LL.B., M.L.C., United Province! LegU- 
lative Council. 

Maulvi Zahuruddin, B.A., M.L.C., United Provinces Legislative Council. 
Bitodar A. H. Mirza, United Provinces Board of 



242 AKHtJAL REPORT. 

Mr. I. D. Varshani, United Provinces Chamber of Commerce, 

Mr. J. P. Srivastava, M.SC,, M.L.C., Upper India Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Dr. Ganesh Prasad, M.A., D.SC,, University of Allahabad. 

Mr. Raja Ram ; B.SC., A.M.I.C.E., Professor of Sanitary Engineering, 
Thomason College. 

Dr. P. P. Phillips, PH. p., F.I.C., I.E.S., Offg. Principal, Thomason 
College, Secretary. 

The College Board of Studies met 5 times during the year, and 
discussed and settled a number of educational matters connected with 
internal work of the College, 

CHANGES IN THE COLLEGE STAFF. 



Lt.-Colonel E. W, C. Sandes, D.S.O., M.C., R.E., proceeded on leave 
out of India from the afternoon of the 9th May, 1929 combined with the 
College vacation from the 16th July, 1929 to 15th October, 1929 and 
Dr. P. P. Phillips, PH. D., F.I.C., I.E.S., Professor of Applied 
Science was appointed to officiate as Principal from the afternoon of 
the 9th May, 1929. 

Mr. Salig Ram resigned charge of his duties as Professor of Civil 
Engineering, Thomagon College, on the afternoon of the 12th October, 
1928 and reverted to his substantive appointment as Executive Engineer, 
Public Works Department, Irrigation Branch, United Provinces, and 
Mr. Mohsin Ali joined as Professor of Civil Engineering on the fore- 
noon of 23rd October, 1928, on transfer from the Irrigation Department, 
United Provinces, 

Mr. R. A. Bradshaw-Smith resigned charge of his duties as Professor 
of Civil Engineering, Thomason College, on the forenoon of the 16th 
October, 1928 and reverted to his substantive appointment as Executive 
Engineer, Public Works Department, Irrigation Branch, United 
Provinces ; and Mr, G. Lacey joined as Professor of Civil Engineering 
on the forenoon of 16th October, 1928 on transfer from the Irrigation 
Department, United Provinces 

Mr. Mohsin Ali proceeded on one month's leave on average pay 
from 7th January, 1929 to the forenoon of 6th February, 1929. 



RKPOKt. 243 

Lieut. J. S. Gurney, Lecturer in Civil Engineering wris appointed 
Head Master and Instructor in Surveying, Overseer Class, with effect 
from the* 16th October 1928. 

Dr. P. P. Phillips PH. D., F.T.C., I.E.S., on return from leave, 
assumed charge of his duties as Professor of Applied Science from the 
16th October, 1928. 

Major A, M. McLean, M.C., on return from leave resumed charge of 
his duties as Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Electrical En- 
gineering from the 16th October, 1928. 

Mr. C. J. Veale on return from leave took over charge of his duties 
as Professor of Surveying and Drawing from the forenoon of 16th 
October, 1928. 

Mr, F. J, Smith retired on superannuation pension from the 15th 
March, 1929 : and Mr. H. T. Gumming, Lecturer in Survey took over 
charge as Lecturer in Drawing in addition to his own duties from the 
15th March, 1929. 

Mr. P. C. Sen Gnpta, Lecturer in Mathematics was on leave on 
Medical certificate from the 1st April 1929 to 30th June, 1929. 

Mr, W. J. Peychers, Assistant Photo, -Mechanical Press proceeded 
ou leave on Medical certificate for 8 months with effect from the 7th 
January, 1929 and B. Hang Behari Lai, Foreman, Litho. Printing 
Section, was appointed to officiate in the leave vacancy. ? 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 

All three Professors were on duty throughout the Session. The 
Department, however, feels the loss of Mr, J. S. Gurney, the Lecturer 
in Civil Engineering who was appointed Head Master of the Overseer 
Class. 

The usual number of preliminary designs were carried out by the 
students under the supervision of the Professors, and this year for the 
first time students of the third, year were given a course of Lectures 
and demonstrations on the use of explosive? in demolitions by Sergeant- 
Major Boxall. R, E., by arrangement with the Commandant, K.G.O. 
1st Bengal Sappers and Miners, Roorkee. 

Two minor projects in buildings and sanitation were carried out by 
the 3rd year students with the assistance of Professors as a preliminary 



244 AKMOAL RKPOtT. 

to the undertaking of the major project in which they work entirely 
unaided. 

The minor projects were on the whole very well executed. They 
included (i) a hospital for infectious diseases, Roorkee, (ii) a drainage 
and sewage disposal scheme for the Civil Lines Area, Roorkee. 

The major project, dealt with the construction of a single line of 
railway designated the Roorkee- Hard war Chord, and was set by Mr. 
J. D. Michael, I.S.E., Assistant Executive Engineer, East Indian 
Railway. It served a dual purpose since it not only tested the pro- 
fessional knowledge of the students in a very practical manner, but 
also elucidated some information ultimately to be of use to the Railway 
Department, In his report on the project, the examiner remarks as 
follows : 

" The work submitted was of a high average standard particularly 
Surveying and Drawing." 

" Reconnaissance Survey is the Survey of an area not of a line." 
The Reconnaissance reports were in most cases merely detailed location 
reports instead of giving a general description of the area and the 
reasons why the alignment selected would best pay for this investigation. 
Very few students noted that the gradient at the junction with the 
Dehra Dun branch was 1 in 200 which would presumably have to be 
regrfeded from the Canal bridge resulting in a higher Formation Level at 
the junction." 

" Many students saved money by lowering the Formation Level between 
the Solani and Ratmau Bridges. The Formation Level between the 
bridges should not have been lower than High Flood Level in tfre Solani 
plus four feet and preferably even higher than this." 

" Some students sited their first station from Roorkee beyond Ratmau 
River At Mile 6 or 7. This would lower the train capacity of the section 
Saharanpur- Hard war the only subsequent remedy being a station at Mile 
3 where the ground was unsuitable." 

" Reference to existing bridges in confirmation of formulae used for 
water way was omitted by many students*" 

" Deductions regarding depth of scour should also be confirmed where 
possible by actual observations. This was probably not practicable in 
the short time allotted to the Project . but reference to the necessity of 
o would have earned marks." 



ANNUAL REPORT, 245 

14 The Design of the bridge was the point where most marks were 
dropped," 

" The reasons for the rejection of the cheaper 40' spans was barely 
touched on. 40' spans being cheaper, even with a larger water way to 
construct the greater number of piers the selection of 60' spans could 
only be justified from local conditions, <?.<;., the size of timber or trees 
carried by the river in flood/' 

" Calculations for the depth of well showed in many cases that wells 
deeper than 40' should have been used. Probably boulders would be 
encountered at 30' as in the bridge at Dausni and 40' wells were there- 
fore safe but this was not stated by any student." 

" Local pot holes round piers allowed for by some students could have 
been constructed by pitching round the wells. One student only noted 
this but failed to include the pitching required in his estimate.'* 

" Students should pay more attention to producing a neat and accurate 
final abstract of cost under each head and sub-head* The cost of the 
line can then be seen at a glance and also those items which have an 
unusually large " Cost per mile "." 

The 3rd year Civil Engineer Class students visited the following 
works during the session : - 

(i). Railway Institute Buildings and Sewage Disposal and Water- 
works, Dehra Dun. 
(). Headworks and River Training Works at Hardwar and 

Bhimgoda. 

(iiV). Hydro-electric Power Station at Bhola. 
The 2nd Year Civil Engineer Class Students visited : 
(i). Construction of a new type of tube well at Piran Kalyar. 
(ii). Ramganga Pumping Works and Weir at Seohara. 
A new type of brass strainer for tube-wells has been purchased this 
year. It is hoped in the ensuing session to prepare a detailed catalogue 
of the models and to eliminate such as no longer serve a useful purpose. 

The experiments performed by Professor Salig Ram during the previ- 
ous session on reinforced brick-work were published during the current 
Session, as were also the experiments of Professor Raja Ram on pres- 
sures on retaining walls. 

A series of useful experiments on cement concrete utilising broken 
brick instead of stone was at the initiation of Professor Lacey carried on 



246 ANNUAL RUPOHT. 

throughout the Session in the laboratory of the Assistant Professor of 
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering to whose staff is due the credit of 
the considerable labour involved, 

A current meter of the latest make has recently been purchased and 
joint discharge observations made with the canal department. It is 
hoped to purchase a new discharge boat as the old ones are worn out and 
to extend operations in this direction. The department has now pur- 
chased a cement-testing machine of latest make for purely departmental 
experiments, and it is hoped to build up in the near future a fully equipp- 
ed laboratory without which experiments cannot be pursued to a success- 
ful conclusion, 

DEPARTMENT OF SURVEYING AND DRAWING. 

As foreshadowed last year a new site for a Survey Camp wa selected 
some 12 miles south of Roorkce which last year formed part of the field 
operations for the Final Project. 

The ground proved to be intricate and well suited for teaching and 
instructional work. In spite of the very cold weather experienced under 
canvas, the health of the camp was excellent. There now exists & full 
competitive equipment for 36 students and year by year an increased 
accuracy in results is evident with the present type of instruments. 
namely, the India Patterns of Levels and Theodolites. 



DEPARTMENT OF PURE AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

The new syllabus, resulting from the adoption of a higher, uniform 
standard at entrance, was introduced this Session, and the results, so far 
as can be seen at present, appear satisfactory. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING. 

During the Session the Department of Electrical Engineering was 
amalgamated with Mechanical Engineering. The Electrical Engineering 
Laboratory was moved to suitable quarters in the Workshops block, and 
is now fitted up and in working order. Various small additions to the 
plant of the department were made during the year, and, so far as funds 
permit, the equipment is kept up to date. The work of the Department 
has continued on the uiual lines. 



ANNUAL RIPORT. 247 

DEPARTMENT OP APPLIED SCIENCE. 

On tbe abolition of the Deparment of Electrical Engineering and 
Physics, the Physics Section was amalgamated with the work of the 
Chemical Department now the Department of Applied Science. The 
old Electrical Engineering Laboratory was dismantled and then refitted 
as a Physics Laboratory. Certain other re-arrangements were made for 
improving the accommodation of the students and the housing of the 
apparatus, etc. The whole of the instructional work has been re-organised 
and brought into line with requirements attendant upon the introduction 
of a higher and more uniform standard at entrance. The full effect of 
this reorganisation will be felt next Session when all the necessary 
improvements will have been completed. 



PHOTO, MECHANICAL AND LITHO. DEPARTMENT. 

Orders have not been quite so numerous this year, consequently the 
receipts have fallen from Rs. 1,02,445/13/- to KB. 86,802/5/-, compared 
with the previous year. Certain internal economies were made to meet 
the situation, necessitating a reduction of the temporary staff. The 
Department has been able to produce a reasonable profit. 

The large map for the Punjab Irrigation Department which has been 
in hand for some time past was completed during the Session at a cost 
of Rs. 7,000/-. It was printed in colours from 50 carefully prepared 
zinc plates. The delicate and intricate work has met with the approval 
of the Punjab Government. 

The Photographic reproduction work executed in connection with the 
United Provinces administrative report, and for the United Provinces 
Irrigation Department, has given every satisfaction. 

The printing work, and particularly the production of the College 
Calendar, received a congratulatory note from His Excellency, the 
Viceroy, when he inspected the College. 

The Department has recently been unfortunate in being deprived of 
the services of Mr. Peychers, the Assistant Superintendent, who had 
to proceed on leave through ill-health. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the students during the Session has been particularly 
good. The outbreak of plague in the Roorkee bazaar and cantonments, 



AWHUAL RKPOKT. 

and in many of the surrounding villages daring the months of February 
to April, was met by increased vigilance of the Medical Staff. Prophy- 
lactic treatment was widely employed to meet the situation. This and 
other precautionary measures were successful in keeping the College 
lines free from this dreaded disease. Regular weekly sanitary inspections 
are carried out and the drinking water supply was frequently and care- 
fully examined. Since there is always a shortage of potable water 
during the hot weather extra care has to be taken to prevent contami- 
nation of the drinking water supply. Effective anti-malarial measures 
were adopted in co-operation with the cantonment authorities, with 
satisfactory results. 

ENGINEER CLASS MESS. 

The dwindling numbers of European students entering the College 
render it increasingly difficult to keep the Mess going along the old 
lines. It is difficult now to make ends meet without largely increasing 
the daily messing charges, and radicle changes in connection with the 
running of Mess are receiving very careful consideration. 



ENGINEER CLASS INDIAN CLUB. 

The Indian Club is in a flourishing condition and is becoming more 
and more an important and popular factor in the lives of the students 
in Roorkee. The students themselves take a very keen interest in its 
management under the guidance of the staff. The recent installation 
of electric light in the Club has been greatly appreciated. 

MILITARY TRAINING. 

Military training has been carried on steadily throughout the year, 
and the progress made is satisfactory. The University Training Corps 
has been equipped with service rifles. These rifles are stored in the 
Sappers and Miners Rifle Kot. 

The A. F. I. in the College, being composed of students from the 
Engineer Class Mess, is dwindling in numbers from year to year. For 
training purposes they have been amalgamated with the University 
Training Corps. 

Alter serving with the Corps since its inception in Thompson College, 
Major A, M. McLean, M.C., resigned his commission in February, 



AKNUAL REPORT* 249 

His resignation was accepted by the Headquarters, University Training 
Corps, with much regret. Major McLean has rendered valuable service 
in connection with the establishment of the Roorkee units. Lt. Crawford 
is m>w in charge. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

The following special repairs were carried out during the year: 
(a). College Main Building. Owing to subsidence due to a 
leakage of an underground main drain, it was necessary to 
re-build a small corner of the Press and Photo, section at a 
cost of Rs, 2,298/-. 

(b). College Dairy. The remaining cowshed was re-roofed with 
Allahabad Tiling borne on Steel Trusses replacing very 
old fashioned country tiles on bamboo mats and frames, 
Cost Rs. 1,274/-. The cowsheds are now complete and in 
very good and sanitary condition. 

(c). Sanitary Department. The College bullock-shed was also 
re-roofed with jack-arches borne on R. S. joists replacing 
old country tiles laid over Sal bully trusses. Cost 
Rg.1,278/-. 

(d). Roods. The coaltarring of roads which was commenced last 
year has been carried further. This method of keeping 
grass down is proving economical, and government repair 
money which had to be spent for the removal of grass will, 
it is hoped, be available for the many repairs to buildings 
which are required from time to time. 

Residential Building*. There still remain 3 thatched bungalows in 
the College Estate and the Annual Repairs on these buildings are 
naturally very heavy. The sanction of Government and allotment of 
funds for re-roofing with jack-arches are patiently awaited. In the 
meantime the white ants continue to attack the timber and thatching 
grass which is provided annually in the shape of repairs. 

Water "Supply. This question still remains a vexing one and until an 
allotment is granted to augment,* the present supply, the scarcity of 
water during the hot months is likely to continue. 



ANNUAL REPOtT, 



Activities on the playing fields have in no wise diminUhed. All 
garn^ bare been w^ll supported, both by students and he $tajf. Tfhe 
Athletic Sports held in December were as successful as usual : all events 
were keenly contested. The introduction of a Gross Country race was 
very popular and caijsed much enthusiasm. Hoqkey and football 
continue to attract large numbers and tennis and squash racquets are as 
popular as ever. A feature of the Regatta which was held in June was 
the keenness of the First year students who contested every event in a 
manner that lead one to expect them to give a good account of them- 
selves next year. 

STUDENTS APPOINTMENTS 

The 26 qualified students of Civil Engineer Class were posted as 
follows after the completion of the courses in July, 1928 : 



Punjab Irrigation, 



Punjab Buildings and Roads, 
C. J?. Buildings ami $oads, ... 



U. P. Buildings and Roads, 
United Provinces Irrigation. 



Chunni Lai Handa, Bam Lai Khanna, 
Axid Bakhsh, Hari Chand Kalra, 
Shiv Nath, B. Sc., Dhai am Pal Sondhi, 
Diwan Chand Bahl & Mir Abdur Rahim. 
Bikram Jit and KrUhau Lai Bansal. 
Qurban Singh, Surendra Nath Tripathi. 
Daya Ram Yadava, . 8c., ^rishnanand 
Dua, Mohd. Naiman Ansari and 
Charanjit Lai Malhotra. 
Reginald Wray Wilson, and 
Shiva Shanker Sharma. 

i ! 

Yadaya Mohan, Harnandan Prasad 
Sinha, Jainti Prasad Jain. 

1 , r , ' ' ' I - 

Raghnbir Saran Jain, Shiam Sunder 
Lai, Wilfred Ronald Plenry, Percy 
Harold McLean, & Izhar Ali Abbasi. 




The annual convocation and Prize distribution took place $t 1 1 a.m. 
on Saturday, the IJjtMuJy- The $on'l>le Raja Baha4ttf 
Sittg^, Minister for ^ijcatioo, Pnite4 Pr^vijces, jres^, 
distinguished visitors present Wjere H. B. Harrop EM., H.L t c,, 



tor of Public Instruction, Lt -Col. Martel, D.S.D., M.C., R.R., Khun 
BAhaduf. A. H. Mirza and Saiyid Tafail Ahmed, M. L. o. 

The Officiating Principal in opening tlie proceeding said : 
ftAJA BAHADUR, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

To-day is a special occasion iti the history (it the bouege, sitice it is 
tile first time that the H on' hie Minister for ^ducatioh lias been able 
to come to ftodr^ee to preside al onr Atihiial t/oiiVocatiHh. l?t is, 
ttier'efdre, gtttifyln'g to us, that you, Sir, ami'd yOhr niaiSifold duties 
h&ve b&m able to visit us, to show yoilr sym'ptiHietiii interest in 
otir activities, arid to obtain sbnle first-Band ktiotflfedge of the ^'br^ 
of our Institution. On behalf of the staff aricl studerite, it id, there- 
Fore, my privilege to extend to you, Sir, a vary heUrty tfelcomta ; and 
as your visit to us must of necessity be of short duration, atrti siflca 
there are many ramifications to the work here, we hope we may bite 
other pleasurable opportunities of welcoming yon in Roorkee in the 
future. 

We likewise are grateful to thoge official and ndtt-officiAl g'entleiA^n, 
who, too, are keenly interested in the Colle^, AtiA ^ho iVe 6Tet iWll- 
ing t6 g!ve us their counsel and support. On behalf of h6 Staff kttd 
S'ttidenis, I tender them also our very Cordial thknk's fot ftonbrrrmg us 
^n'th their presence to-day. 

Before proceeding briefly to review the woilc of the ^a6t fifcsisibW, one 
ol- two f6at^res of the year now drawing to 'A cfofi d&ll for fcpefefel Com- 
ment. In the Erst place, it is a matter of general satisfaction to be tfble 
to T&'6rd th : ^t, etespite tli'e aT)ol!titfn of g^arartteed Ap'6?nfotofeWts, public 
Tnte^S't AUd Sttpport of the ThdmasO'n College fthows no fifigftfs of MflWig 
off. There has been, for instance, u steady increase in the tfttmber of 
^plicants s5ein^ admission. For the 70 vacancies offered in JtfneU-$0 
In Aie Civil fingfirieer Class and 40 in the Ovfci^er ClrfSS, tfhere Wire 
no fewer than 687 registered applicants who were qjul^Hfied td sit fo't ^le 
entrance ekacoinatiotis, which, as you know, are hold shftultatieousty in 
seven centres for the convenience of the cartd/flates, We aVe, therefore, 
able to select some of the best men ft voluble from the CM leges find School a, 
and train them for careers of usefulness and fcervick, atid the ftetfJUnd 
for Roorkee trained men is such thnt we are able to find enfpltfytflfctft for 
ill who Sfttmfactorily complete the donrse. Moreover, we are fttte to 
report that six ftoorkee trained men, who left the College list yew; wre 



252 ANNUAL REPORT. 

telected in open competition for employment in the Indian Service of 
Engineers and we hope that many of those who are now passing out will 
be just as successful in this respect. So long as the standard of training 
remains as high as it is at present, there is little doubt these successes 
in the way of I. S. E. appointments will continue. 

One of the secrets of the success attained by this College is to be fouud 
in the manner in which all the staff co-operate in the various sections 
of the work, both in the class room and on the playing fields. A proper 
spirit of keenness and enthusiasm is kept alive throughout the institution, 
and it is no formal thing when I express my deep gratitude to the Staff 
for their real, whole-hearted support. 

During the past session there have been few changes in the Staff. We 
regret the absence of Colonel Sandes ; the more so on account of the fact 
that he had to leave us suddenly in May through ill-health, and we are glad 
to receive the latest report that he is quite fit again. Mr. Mohsin Ali 
joined us at the beginning of the Session from the United Provinces 
irrigation Department, and replaced Mr. Salig Ram as one of the 
Professors of Civil Engineering, and we hope he will be able to remain 
with us for the full period of his transfer. We have lost the services of 
Mr. F. J. Smith, Lecturer in Drawing, who retired in March last, after 
having rendered the College 31 years of faithful service. Our very best 
wishes follow him in his retirement, and we sincerely hope he may be 
able to enjoy his well earned leisure with his family for many years to 
oo me. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering and Physics which had 
been in existence many years, was abolished in accordance with the 
recommendations of the special Committee appointed by Government, 
and the work divided up, The Electrical Engineering Section has been 
transferred to the Workshops, and placed uuder the charge of Major 
McLean, while the work in Physics has been incorporated with that of 
the Chemical Department. The laboratories both for Physics and 
Electrical Engineering have been entirely remodelled, and the changes 
effected have enabled the Surveying Department to make better provision 
for their laboratory work, and for the better housing of their valuable 
instruments. 

Early in the year the College residential quarters were provided with 
electric light, aud this has proved a great boon to all concerned. The 



ANNUAL REPOKT. 253 

actual carrying out of the scheme was long delayed owing to the difficul. 
ties experienced by Government in finding the necessary funds, bat now 
the College has been linked up with the Bahadrabad Hydro-Electric 
station, we are all very grateful to Government for being able recently to 
provide the requisite money, and to Major McLean for his capable hand, 
ling of the electrical project, We are still hopeful about our water 
supply scheme which has also long been held up owing to lack of funds, 
but we trust that, in due course, the money for this essential will likewise 
be forthcoming, so that the difficulties we experience each hot weather 
in providing an adequate supply of drinking water, will disappear. 

Military training is making satisfactory progress under Lt. Crawford 
who took over command of the University Training Corps units from 
Major McLean. Major McLean has been responsible for the develop- 
ment of the University Training Corps from the commencement of the 
movement in Roorkee. Our thanks arc due to both these officers for the 
efficiency attained by the College Sections of the U. T. C. and A. F. 

The health of the students has been particularly good throughout 
the year. Plague was prevalent in the bazaar and in the surrounding 
villages in February and March, yet no case occurred among the students 
or staff. Naturally all precautionary measures were taken, including an 
extensive application of the prophylactic treatment, and the College 
Medical Staff are to be congratulated on the. happy results of their labour 
in preventing the disease from entering College lines. 

Discipline has been good, but the maintenance* of a high standard 
of discipline is, of course, a feature of the College, and, therefore, no 
further comment is needed. 

The work of the year, on* the whole, has been as successful as in former 
years. At one time a certain slackness was noticeable in one class, but 
the members of that class subsequently made strenuous efforts to 
retrieve the situation, and succeeded to a considerable extent, but they 
no doubt made the discovery that steady application throughout the 
session ie preferable in the end, and produces better results at less 
trouble to all concerned. 

Coming now to the list of prize winners, the Council of India Prize 
of Rs. 1,000/-, awarded to the most distinguished student of the Civil 
Engineer Class passing out this year goes to Mr. Dharam Chand 
Baijal, who also carries off the Medals in Descriptive Engineering, 
Applied Mechanics, and Surveying. We congratulate him rery heartily 



254 

on his success. He has won and maintained his position by hard ftork 
in the face of severe competition. Mr. Mulk Raj Chopra is likewise to 
be warmly congratulated in having secured the honour of Second place, 
and in winning the Maolagan Prize for Electrical Engineering ahd 
Physics, and the medal for Mechanical Engineering. The third f)lac"e 
in order of merit has been gained by Mr. Des Raj Khanna who thus 
secures the Rai Bahadur Kanhya Lai Gold Medal, and he too i$ to be 
cordially commended. 

The Project prize is looked upon as one of the most important prizes 
of the year, inasmuch as it tests the students ability to apply his 
knowledge to practical Engineering problems. This year, the major 
project involved the construction of a single line of railway from Rborfcee 
to Hardwar a project which will, in all probability, be carried out in tne 
near future by the Railway Board to meet the competition of motor 
traffic by road. Mr. R. H. Goodman is to be very highly commended in 
carrying off the blue-ribbon award The Thomason Memorial Gold Medal 
for the best Engineering design with an aggregate of 77 '8 *) bf the 
total marks. Mr. D. R. Khanna is also to be congratulated on the 
creditable achievement of gaining second place with 72*5 *J and Mr. 
P. 8. Bhatnagar third place in order of merit with 71 ! | a of the marks. 
The Project examiner (Mr. Michael) in hie report states that "tne work 
submitted was of a high average standard, particularly in &urveyito& and 
Drawing." Mr. Michael's report concludes with various valuable hints 
and practical advice which cannot be dealt with here. A copy of the 
report has been placed on the College notice board and is worthy of close 
study by all the students. Our best thanks are <fue to Mr. Michael for 
all the care he has bestowed upon setting and marking the project. 

In the Civil Engineer Class 3rd Year, there is, I regret to report, one 
failure. There is also one failure in the 2nd Year. All the students of 
the 1st year pass. In the 3rd Year, 15 secure the higher certificate. 

In the Overseer Class all puss in the 2nd Year and 16 students gain 
the higher certificate. Five failures are recorded in the 1st year. There 
is, however, an all round improvement in the standard of work in the 
Overseer Section. Shiv Sharan Swami, who stands first, and wins the 
prize of Rs lOOf- and the Silver Medal for General Merit ; and Nathu 
Mai Jain, who stands 2nd on the list, are both to be commended on the 
results of their work. The Overseer Class project prize goes to E. D. 



ANNUAL RKPORT. 25 



Pande : N. D. Pujari gains 2nd place. These stu,d^ts also re to \ie 
congratulated. 

The importance of games and athletics for those training for out-door 
life t is effectively recognised throughout the College and has frequently 
been mentioned iq. Convocation addresses. Activity in tliis direction helps 
in the formation of character and also helps to Jay Ifye foundation of a 
healthy constitution. Much keenness has been evinced in this Section 
of the work during the past Session. Mr. D. V. Ghosh won the College 
Championship in the Athletic Sports and theieby seemed the Lion 
Trophy and the Silver Cup given by Colonel Saudes. Dhara Slng'jh 
was second. Mr. Qhosh also won the Cross-Country Championship 
and gained thereby the Bradshaw- Smith Cup. This year the competi- 
tion between the Civil Engineer Class and the Overseer Class has been 
very close, and we congratulate both these students on their successes. 
The Vizianagram Cup, awarded to the best Indian Athlete in the 3rd 
Year Civil Engineer Class, has, on this occasion, been \von by Mr. 
Balwant Singh Nag to whom we offer our cordial congratulations. 

The cup for lawn tennis singles was won by Mr. P. N. Gadi ; and the 
cup for tennis doubles goes to Messrs. S. R. Mehta and S. L. Sahgal, 
Mr. S. D. Sinha won the Squash racquets singles Championship and 
Messrs, S. D. Sinha and S. N. Wadhwa the Squash doubles and the 
Silver Cup given by Professor Puri. All these students are to be 
congratulated on their success. 

A feature of the regatta this year was the keenness ehown by the 1st 
year students, who, on many occasions, very nearly beat older and more 
experienced crews. We expect the first year to give a good account of 
themselves during the forthcoming Session. The boating cup goes to 
Mr. D. R. Kobli ; the pair oars to Messrs. Vanna and Banerjee. The 
K.G.O. 1st Sappers and Miners' Cup for double Sculls was won by 
Messrs. Kohli and Mehta. Messrs. Har Dyal, S. L. Bazaz, S. K, 
Banerjee and R. K. Varma of the 2nd Year Civil Engineer Class 
secured the trophy for the Challenge fours. All these students deserve 
to be commended. 

The Harcourt Butler Cup awarded annually to the student possessing 

,.,,< : f ' ,,, '1 ' M * ' , - i* ' ' ' r " ' ' < <c * 

the beet record of work and play oes this year to Mr. Bnlwant Singh 
Nag. Oar heartiest congratulations are offered to Mr. Balwant Singh 
Nag on his success, 



256 ANNUAL REfORT. 

In the Olympic contest this year the K. G. 0. 1st Sappers and Miners 
were again successful. The contest was very keen indeed, and the 
College only lost by one point, the final score being K.G.O.- 1st 
Sappers and Miners 13 points the College r2. During the contest We 
were pleased to see that the President, Recreations, is still able to keep 
his end up at the wicket, arid we congratulate both Professor Veale and 
Mr. Rao for winning the prizes given for scores over 50 made in 
matches. We congratulate Mr. Webb also, in securing the batting and 
bowling prize. 

One more Session has passed, and the eyes of most of those 
present are now directed towards the vacation. Holidays are sweeter 
after labour, and both staff and students are looking forward to a 
period of recuperation after 9 months strenuous application. The 
mistake is sometimes made by those not very familiar with the College 
in thinking that the work of both staff and students in Roorkee can be 
measured merely by the periods set down in the time tables. All 
students here are in residence and the corporate life of the College involves 
both staff and students in many activities outside the class-room, in 
fact, these outside, activities, in which both staff and students are 
associated, are just as important as work in the class-room, and eon- 
tribute in a large measure to the success of the institution. 

Most of the students here will return again to us after the holidays, 
To the Seniors, however, to-day's proceedings remind you, if any reminder 
were necessary, that your College days are over. You are now equipped 
to embark on your careers as engineers, and you take with you the best 
wishes from us all. In the years to come you will look back upon 
many happy days spent at lioorkee in the company of friends, now 
about to be scattered over this great country. Never lose sight of 
the traditions of your College ; earn a reputation for reliability, dili- 
gence and trustworthiness, play the game throughout life as you would 
on the playing fields in Roorkee, and then success will be yours. 
The Hon'ble Raja Kushalpal Singh spoke as follows : 
DR. PHILLIPS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE STAFF 
I thank yon most sincerely for the kind and hearty welcome which 
you have given to me, I need hardly tell you how glad I am to have 
been able to avail myself of Col, Sandes' invitation to visit this up-to- 
date and unique institution. It is a matter of great regret to me that 



litfPOKf. 25Y 

illness has compelled him to proceed on leave out of India* Bat ft 
gives me pleasure to learn that he is quite fit again, t take this oppor- 
tunity of expressing ruy appreciation of the zeal and deiotidrt with Which 
you, hive applied yourselves to your duties. It is particularly satis- 
factory to find evidence of enthusiasm and keenness ev^ryWheie in this 
institution. 1 was greatly struck with the bearing arid shWtness of the 
students and the general air of briskness. The whole tOiie of tftfe 
College reflects high credit on both the staff and the students . 
What strikes one is the orderly, systematic and well- organised manner 
in which this institution is managed. It is, no wonder, that the students 
ar6 attracted to this institution in large numbers' and experience no 
difficulty in finding suitable employments. The popularity of Ihi 
institution proves the usefulness of the instruction iinparied here. 

the praise bestowed on Li. Crawford and Major McLean for the 
ffltfitaty training given to the students is well-deserved. 

In my official capacity as the head of Government in the Education 
department, I am, in duty bound, to be interested in the well-being of 
this distinguished institution, but it IN owing to its acknowledged and 
undoubted utility to the country that it has a warm place in my heart, 
I have great regard for this institution which turns out a most useful 
class of men. It has a brilliant record associated with illustrious names 
ot enduring fame. The late 8ir Gtangn Ram whose labours have shed 
lustre upon the country was an alumnus of this institution. It is this 
institution which has supplied a body of distinguished engineers whose 
ability and integrity have been the theme or universal admiration and 
have vindicated the capacity of our countrymen for higt ofeces in tne 
State. I sincerely hope that this institution will be the seed-plot from 
w&icJh will spring the clistinguishedf galaxy of eminent men whose notable 
achievements in the domains of irrigation, means of communication, and 
public works, will evoke in no unstinted measure the approbation of th 
public opinion. 

It is my pleasant task to congratulate the prize-winners on the prizes 
they have won, 1 extend to them my sincere wishes for their farther 
success in life. 

Students of the College, I heartily congratulate yon on the attain* 
ment of distinction for which you worked so hard. You have given 
good account of yourielres in athletic sports. You have invigorated 



258 ANNUAL RKPORT. 

your bodies by physical exercises and thus fitted yourselves for an 
arduous life which your profession requires you to lead. Your 
calling is recognised among the noblest. Yours is a heaven-appointed 
task, a divine mission. It will be through you that irrigation 
works, so vitally necessary for the agricultural industry and consequent 
well-being of the nation, will be maintained and carried out. It will be 
through you that railway lines and metalled roads, so absolutely necessary 
for the development of trade and resultant prosperity of the country, 
will be kept in repair and constructed. It is clear from the Principal's 
review of the work of the past session that you have had a very 
strenuous time. One who leads an arduous life of toil and effort is 
bound to succeed in life. Your first duty is to yourself. Men are not 
ordinarily impelled by a consideration of other people's interests. Raise 
yourselves to positions of affluence by force of character and ability. 
As pointed out above,, the very nature of your work is such that while 
success in your profession brings you wealth and fame, it advances the 
high interests of the country as well , It should be your sacred duty to 
achieve success in your profession. Your success will facilitate economic 
uplift and by your work the future progress of the country will be 
shaped. The economic condition of our country has to be improved. 
If yon are successful in your profession, you can play an important and 
effective part in that great task. Strive after great things and believe 
yourselves capable of them. Follow the example of the late Sir Ganga 
Ham whose life will be a great inspiration to you. If you will cultivate 
self-reliance, do your work with vigour, energy and earnestness and 
develop your capacity for undertaking great enterprises, the success in 
life will assuredly be yours. 

I thank you again for your kind reception and wish you all good 
fortune and success. 

We have the pleasure of the presence of the Director of Public 
Instruction who takes a real interest in this institution. 



I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

P. P. PHILLIPS, PH. D., F.I.C., I.B.8., 

0/g. Principal. 



ANNUAL REPOHT. 



259 



w 


< 

H 



1 





W>X 


^ ee * ^ O CO o 

oo eo co - ^ <* 

^ ct 


1 


streipui 


O4 04 O " O CO O 

oo co eo jrj ^H ** 




qspug 


G* IM *M ; : ; 




Wox 


b. o O ^ -< 

CM ** CO CO "H ^* 

o* .._._- 


s 


'etmpui 


!>. tO t^ * *-> r~* 

~ co eo eo "* * 




TOP3 


O "* CO : ; 




WU 


^ ^ ^ ^ 
CO CO 00 -^ "*l 


' 

OV 


stmpux 


t^ , - <M O O 
2 CO <M "^ "* 




qspug 


t co <N : ; ; 




*|B^OX 


t- 00 C^I "* 

c5 "** w o 


Oft 


'BllBtpUJ 


1 s 8 i s 5 ~ 




q S ug 


oo s >A : . : ; 




WM 


4 O O *-' COOOCO 
CM CO CO 2* GO *<* 


i 


SUBIpUJ 


1 3 a - |s w 




q sm a a 


: : : : : 






= : J : : : 




1 

<D 


f 1 

1 , , , , | -: : , 5 

- * 

Hg "^ 
f *R ? ' 

5 a 'C J5 

5 a* & 

li ! Ill 



* ,3 
*" 35 

pal 

5 

22 1 
"I 

e 





Civil Eng 



the Final 
mination. 



thd En 
mination 



ap fo 
inati 



REPORT. 



aqjj 



(in ara) 



pti iot 



-ipaoqns aaMOi 



. 

^ jadd n 



* 00 *ii-i ~ 



ps^oioco 

O^^H i^ 

oo o 



s 



puc 



<NrH (M *,-***' 



tp-ioqns jaAvo 



awn 
-Tpjoqng J 



8 



a 




A K NO A I, UKPORT. 



ft. 





Wj, 


8<y> w t- 
P "< 


9) 




s 

05 
I"H 


'8QIpUJ 


o o co r> 1 
^ t- - 


Oi 
00 




qscjug 


co : ; ; 


CO 




1|OX 


fc t^. 00 *0 
00 l^ <N 





i 


snutpuj 


t <x> cc 

00 t> 01 







qwpug 


o : : : 


< 




mox 


1C <N OS ^ 
00 > W 


i 


b- 

<M 

OS 


SHBlpUJ 


O5 (M <?> H 
^ t^ CO 


8 




qspug 


50 r : : 


O 




'Wox 


00 ?O ~ ^* 
00 -< 00 CO 


2 
N 


** 


tfimpui 


QO < MI ^ 
t> 00 CO 




(M 




qspjag 


2 : : : 


2 




T^OX 


O O 3^ O 
00 00 (M 




CM 



W 

o> 


KUBlpUI 


t- tf> c< eo 

l^. 00 (M 


O) 
1-4 




qspug 


C5 ; ; ; 


OS 






. . ... 


. 














: : : : : 


1 




i. 

*0 

"S 

4) 








| 




f P' I 

11 o 

^ s ^ 

1 1 f i i 

1 1 ? i 1 

W J! 1 

I 1 1 i i 

U ^ O Q 08 





862 



j 

e 



-S 
35 



I 



6- 



ANNUAL RKPOKT. 






gnputjj 



I 

Q 



^- QO <M 



S 



oo 

10 



8 



rtm 



rs, 
it 



and 



tice O 
Mech. 



taff, 



S 
Stu 
Ap 





ANNUAL ItlPORt* 203 




i 


M 


pj ,* fc^ 


- 




1 
Ok 


)* 


^ ^ * co eo e 






0* 


g ^ O) 


~~ 


*! 




0* 


^ *- 5 








**1* 


CQ co 


2 S g 5 


S 




s 


g 


3 ^r 


eo 




J* 





















5 




^ ~ co - o e 


CO 




Q 


g 








Vw 
OS 


|rs2 


j O f-. h- CO O5I 










53 p O> 












00 CO CO ^** 






1 


^i 


8. i S. S S 

M o ^r * ^ 


1 









^ o o c o t 
^ x o -! cr* 


*. 






* 


11 * ' "* 






QO 


o 








*< 


H 


t- QO >- O CO 

^j O< O5 O> OS 


f 




1,1 




co c*r ^H" f-T 


S' 




11 


Jj p^ O CO 50 i CO 


CO 




N^.JO 


^ajos,^ coc:>. ^*o 


CM 




^S 


i C* r jg C*^ i r < r^ r-4 r~4 


^ 


^ 


^5 * 


J-M QQ J 




> 


^ H 


bDSJ QO -^ co ~i b 

,o 2 - - *** * co t- 


*J 








^ i OO >O U> tO 




w 


o ^ 


S 


o~ o" ^ * 


(NT 


J 


CO ^ 


X3 




<N 


PQ 
^ 


"C si 




pj t- CM A -r 


* 


H 


S o* 


d t . 








Sis 


g 


^j 10 Jin -ti i * o 


to 




? 


SS.QO 
*r* 

d < en, 


GO CO ifi QO O 


00 




2*1 


M 2 


"* ^ - 

2 2- w " 


80* 




s 










,O v 










o ** 









3 

















cs 








fc. 

fo 








V 








>d 








^> 




i : if 3 








o 




*S 




^ . H 






ts 








63 






c 







^ ^ 




statement 


"o 


^ : : . . : : 

1 a 
1 5 | 1 




<t> 

.s> 




: i * 




"S 




V ( 

C 




g. 




1 I 1 1 




t 




r r S 4j 








||| | 1 



2Y4 



AKKfTAI. 



28 



pajnioddy 



00 ""* 



during 1924 



CO <N t* 



who have obtained emp 



j 4 



ered and the num 



reg 



of candidat 








I 






S 



pg^uioddy 



o 




AttNBAI. RErOKf. 






> I 

H 1 








IW 




8 


:i-::: 


* 




' 'Haiti 1O dATlKKT 








CM 


9 
























' 


uapy 











i 


erpuj (U)n9Q 


_, r-( 


CM 








pai vmiiicKttH 


... . . 






* 


.3 


"890UIA 


. . CO r-* 


< 


..-.,... 




ts 


oa^i t^j^uaj3 






- 






tBSUQ 






........ 




ii 


pu JI81[ t}H 







I 

















M 










* 









. 




. 




11 a 








* 




aouuoij 









. 


japuoj 


fit ^M'V* 1 ^ 


















....... 






0Up]^ 




* 


* * * " ' ' * 



















Anqraog 








* 




809 


. . _ 


^ 


... ... 


. 




I u 














. . 4 


_ - 




. 




RI 9 Q 












snoaireuaosiH 










oi 


pu {edpiunj^ 
























o< 


notyv&uii 




- 

















_ 


















srioauBuaostivT 








CM 


&t 


puv {tidioiuu^ 




"* 






r& V 
O> fi 
.13 ' 


no^aun 


: :- : : : 


00 


CN ' ' ' 


CM 

04 


^ 









. . w 


(M 




tstaniiojj 


.... 




. . ..... 






ttfint!l!K 


::::: 


oo 


:* : : : : ; 


** 




S ^,!I 


. . . co 





: :- : : : 


CO 



















Applications from employer 
Engineers, 
Upper Subordinates, 
Oversetrs, 
Lower Subordinates, 
Draftemen, 
Mistris. 
Press Workers, . 
Photo. -Mecnanioal operators, 


3 

O 

H 


Appointments through Colleg 
Engiuer, 
Upper Subordinates, 
OYerseeri, 
Lower Subordinates, 
Draftsmen, 
Mistri^ 
Presa Workers, 
Photo.- Mchanical operators, 


* 



2(6 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Statement showing the expenditure of the Thomason College, Roorkee for 
the year 1927-28 under 31 -Education (Provincial). 



(a,), College Department ; 

1 . Pay of Officer, Voted, 

Non-Voted, ... 

2. Pay of Establishment, 

8. Allowances and Honoraria Voted, 
NorflVoted, ... 

4. Cost of passages, Non-Voted, .,, 

5. Supplies and Services, 

6. Contingencies, 

7. Grant-in-aid contribution, etc., 

Non- Voted, ... 



Total College Department Voted, 

Non-Voted, 



(b)^ Photo. -Mechanical and Lithographic Department : 

1. Pay of Establishment, 

2. Allowances and Honoraria, ... 
8. Supplies and Services, 

4. Contingencies, 

Total Photo.-Mechl. Department 

Deduct contribution from other Governments for 
Training of itudents, 

Total Civil Engineering College Voted, 
Non-Voted, 

(<j). Civil Engineering College Book Depot : 
1. Pay of Establishment, 

2 Supplies and Services, 

Total, 
(if). Scholarships Separate figures not available. 



1,34,398 

68,729 

59,814 

2,743 

546 

6,511 

76,176 

27,247 

1,200*' 



2,99,873 
66,986 



40,040 

33,803 
8,756 



77,599 



1,25,975 

2,51,497 
(I 



288 
16,422 



16,710 



HBPORT. 



267 



.Statements showing the Receipts of the Civil Engineering College^ 

Roorkee, for the year 1927-28 under -XXT., Education 

(Provincial), 



A. University, 

1. Fees, Civil Engineering College, Roorkec, 

Miseellaneww. 

2. Examination fees, Civil Engineering College, 

Roorkee, 

3. Sale proceeds of Books, Civil Engineering College, 

Roorkee, 

4. Workshop Manufactures, 

5. Photo, and Lithographic Department Receipts, 



6. Rents of Buildings, 

7. Miscellaneous, 



Separate figures not 
available, 



Separate figures not 
available, 



32,264 

7,260 

21,959 

7,579 

1,00,448 



ANKU4L 



Statement of the annual accounts of the Thomason College 
Workshops for the year 



Receipts. 


Amount. 


Expenditure, 


Amount. . 




KB. A. p. 




Rs. A. P. 


Manufacture, 


5,717 9 


Salaries of Assistant 








Professor of Mechanical 




Other item*, 





Engineering, 
Salaries of 1st and 2nd 


11,921 






Lecturers in Mechanical 








Engineering, 
Salaries of Mechanical 


9,395 4 






Draftsman. 


1,320 






Salaries of Foremen and 








Assistant Foremen, . . 


10,860 10 






Salaries of Store-keeper, 


420 






Salaries of Survey Mistry, 


780 






Salaries of Stoker, 


1 






218100 








Salaries of Mistry (Water- 


V 698 10 






Works), 48000 


I 






Salaries of Menials 








( Workshop G imnls), 
Travelling allowance, . 


1,026 
156 8 






Manufacture 








Labour, 


1,132 9 6 






Dii'eej charges to Works, 


000 






Stock, 


4,492 6 9 






Tools and Plant (Work 








hop Machines), 


999 10 






Geiicial charges, 


000 






Miscellaneous, 


12, 882 4 6 






Generating Station 








charges, 


11,998 2 3 






Laboratory and Class 








charges, 


4,488 15 6 






Workshop Practice, 


4,999 11 * 


Total, 


5,717 9 


Total, 


77,521 12 3 


Manufacture Account. 


(Including credit wales of Stock and Instruction charges for students). 


Unrealished b a 1 a n c e 








brought forward, 
Direct charges to Works, 


1,411 15 2 
000 


Cash Receipts, 
Stock Returns, 


6,717 9 
000 


Labour, . . . 


1,132 fi 


Unrealised balance 




Stock (including Credit 




carried forward, 


478 2 5 


Sulep), 


3,638 5 9 






Profit (on private works 








only), .. 


12 8 3 






TML 


UK a a 


Total, 


MM * * 



ANNUAL HKPOKT. 



949 



Statement of the annual accounts of the Thomason College 
Workshops for the year 1927-28. 



Receipts. 



Amount, 



Expenditure. 



Amount. 



Payments daring the year, 
Closing Balance, 

Total, 



Opening Balance, 

Cash Purchases, 
Returns from Works, 

Total, 



Opening Balance includ- 
ing Weir Feed Pump, 

Total, 



Labour Account, 
Rs. A. P. 



1,U1 13 
97 3 



1,230 



Opening Balance, 
Wages for the year, 



Total, 



Stock Account. 



10.335 9 10 

4,492 t 9 
000 



14,828 7 



Issuer to Works (includ- 
ing credit sales), 
Closing Balance, 



Total, 



Tooh- and Plant ( Workshop Machines) 
Account. 



1,16,985 10 



1,16,985 10 



Depreciation, 
Closing Balance, 

Total, 



Rs. A. *. 

106 10 
1,132 6 



1,239 



3.688 5 9 
11,189 10 10 



14,828 7 



12,986 9 
1,08,999 1 



1,16,985 10 



270 



S 
.3 



*l 
Q 

A? 
O 
O 



I 
I 



o 

I 

44 
O 

5 
m 



*} 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

00 



* 



bo 

a 



o , 

i. . .* 



S. ..2g 



CO O O 

tO r-< O 



-^ o t 
o tfc 



2 sS 



^ *c s < 

2 1 *! 

5 <U ' 

ilJT] 



o o t co 

O fH <M U5 



c 

O S 
Qft 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



271 





Cu 


o 




CM 







< 


eo 




4 


CO 




t * 

.& 


s 




*' 


a* 




^'000 
. CM (t* 

aoaoo* 
tf oT 


; 




oc eo 
0? - 










K- : "3 




s ** 




S "o 




*^ H 




K H 


Account. 


I 

1? 

11 
050 


SB Account. 


5| 

II 

(S3 C 


09 
0> 


al 


o 


"3 


PW 





*5 


^ 




ca 






CO 


^ 


00 




^ 


CO 


* 


3 


-tl 
o 

2 


1 
o 


OQ 


- 




<0<N 






< 2 






r-i CO 


; 




: as 


i 




^ (M GO 












O 






2- 






3 




o 




o 








8* H 

?>> 




J 




J be 




it> 




' 

|i 

oi 




1 



00 

c* 
t> 

CQ 

2 

i 
* 

o 



o> o 

00 ~ 



oo i-< fc- e~ o 



05 03 

cp * 

*.**. 

** M m-s 



co oTt 

^ 3 



eft O **"* 
^ 



_ 

g-S-s 






- 



CM 



co * 

W5 



^ CO IO O O3 CO 



-<tO <M 



. 

CO 






CO 5- O 
X l> 00 



II 



si 8 " 8 



Oft 00 ' OO 

p 
gr ?f 



;o cc 
; eo 



i Oi * Oft Cfe 








I